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shuafat refugee camp

  • This is how many Israeli cops it takes to demolish a Palestinian home

    Around 1,200 members of the Israeli security forces entered Shuafat refugee camp in East Jerusalem on Wednesday morning to oversee the demolition of the home of Ibrahim al-Akri, who killed two Israelis in Jerusalem last year. Approximately 1,200 members of the Israeli security forces entered Shuafat refugee Camp in East Jerusalem Wednesday morning to demolish the home of a Palestinian who killed two Israelis in a terror attack last year. The attacker, Ibrahim al-Akri, drove his car into a crowd of people in Jerusalem in November 2014, killing Jadan Asad, a Border Police officer, and Shlomo Aharon Badani. According to Haaretz,…

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  • You may not see it, but Jerusalem is being torn apart

    Redrawing the map of Jerusalem will not lock out potential attackers. Instead, it will only spark the sort of reaction one could expect following the wholesale nullification of rights from a significant number of Palestinians. By Yoav Galai With so much being written about the volatility of the status quo on Jerusalem’s Temple Mount, a bigger picture of a deeply divided city breaking apart is becoming lost. On Sunday, Israel’s Channel 2 reported that the government is considering revoking the residency status of Palestinians in East Jerusalem who live beyond the separation barrier. Though this would potentially remove tens of…

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  • Jerusalem: Between killing and crying

    Calling the current events in Israel-Palestine a 'cycle of violence' is a misnomer — it is a cycle of rage, of which violence is just one part. In the middle of a recent conversation with a university lecturer, I mention an incident I witnessed while photographing a demonstration in the West Bank a few weeks earlier. I recount seeing a Palestinian teenager sobbing while watching her (unarmed, peaceful) father being hauled away by members of the Border Police, his hand reaching back towards her in desperation. Recalling my feelings of despair and fury at what I saw, I confide to the…

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  • WATCH: Police shoot Palestinian man in face with sponge-tipped bullet

    The shooting in Shuafat is the latest in a string of incidents in which bystanders — predominantly Palestinian — have suffered severe injuries due to being struck with the projectiles. A Palestinian man in his 40s lost his right eye after Israeli security forces shot him with a sponge-tipped bullet on Sunday. Nafaz Damiri, of the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Beit Hanina, happened to be in the city's Shuafat Refugee Camp when clashes broke out between Israeli police and Palestinian youth. [tmwinpost] CCTV footage shows Damiri, a bystander, running into a market to seek cover from the clashes. In the video, Damiri…

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  • Jerusalem Police shoot 10-year-old Palestinian boy in the eye

    Over the past several months, Jerusalem Police has been stepping up its use of a new weapon: black-tipped sponge bullets.  Israeli Police wounded a 10-year-old Palestinian child in the eye Thursday afternoon while dispersing protesters near the Shuafat refugee camp in Jerusalem, according to Arabic media outlets in East Jerusalem. The boy, who was most likely hit by a black-tipped sponge bullet, was hospitalized in moderate condition in Hadassah University Hospital. It is unclear what will be the fate of his eye. [tmwinpost] Jerusalem Police responded to the incident, stating that "Public works projects take place in the Shuafat refugee…

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  • WATCH: In Jerusalem, ‘Palestinians aren’t allowed to dream’

    A short documentary film looks at three Palestinian families in East Jerusalem and their struggle to build homes. Filmmaker Omri Shenhar: ‘They drive us in their cabs, build our houses, and collect our trash. But when it comes to their rights we shutter our eyes and hide behind a wall.’ By Omri Shenhar A few months ago I spent an entire weekend in Jerusalem. On Friday I went with my whole family, guided by my grandfather, to the Har'el Brigade monument located next to the Israeli Supreme Court.  My grandpa told us about the battles that he took part in.…

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  • PHOTOS: Denied services by Jerusalem, Palestinian residents form emergency response team

    Photos & text: Yotam Ronen, Oren Ziv, Shiraz Grinbaum /Activestills.org Although it is hidden away from the view of most the city's residents by a separation barrier, the Shuafat refugee camp is officially part of Jerusalem. Therefore, like every other neighborhood in Jerusalem, Shuafat's residents (who pay municipal taxes) depend on the city for their infrastructure and sanitation services. So what happens when the municipality simply ignores its own residents? They take matters into their own hands. Three months ago, several young residents of Shuafat decided to take initiative and start an emergency response team (which they named "Taqam Taware' Assalam,"…

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  • Living in a cage: On jail, running and the Shuafat Camp

    As a conscientious objector, being confined in prison made Moriel Rothman's chest fill with pain and panic. A year later, the feeling resurfaced while visiting Shuafat Refugee Camp in East Jerusalem. By Moriel Rothman Last October, I spent 20 days in Israeli military jail for refusing to serve in the army. I got a brief sense then of what it is like to live in a cage, to have my every move scrutinized, to have to request permission to move, to fear that if I made the wrong move, my time in the cage would be increased. I felt like my soul…

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  • Jerusalem's refugee camp: Abandoned by the state

    Although the Shuafat refugee camp is under the jurisdiction of the Jerusalem Municipality, one look at the lack of basic infrastructure, the sewage running in the streets and the unsafe conditions reveal that it is part of a different world. By Chen Misgav Several weeks ago, during a late Saturday morning, a group of 20 Jewish-Israelis leave their cars at the entrance to an intimidating military checkpoint outside Shuafat refugee camp. We are meeting with A., a representative of the Jerusalem Committee Against the Wall and the Settlements, who will be giving us a tour of the camp. We walk…

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  • A Palestinian mother grapples daily with the traumas of the Nakba

    Amira is a 30-year-old Palestinian woman, struggling to raise her three children in Shuafat Refugee Camp. Amira grapples with fear, feelings of vulnerability, and isolation from her family in Amman. But her biggest concern is teaching her children to love. The robbery was the proverbial straw that broke Amira’s back. Two weeks ago, Amira, her husband, and three children discovered their house in Shuafat Refugee Camp had been broken into. The money that Amira and her husband, Munir, had set aside for a family vacation to Jordan—where Amira’s parents and three brothers live—was gone. Jewelry that had sentimental value was…

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  • Shuafat refugee camp: Walled Jerusalem ghetto gets more walls

    By Alexis Thiry and Markus Schlotterbeck For the people using the brand new light rail in Jerusalem, Shuafat is just another station servicing an Arab neighborhood in the city. But Shuafuat refugee camp, stuck between the French Hill and Pisgat Ze’ev settlements (and distinct from the nearby neighborhood of the same name), is a third world community that lies just two kilometers away from the country's most important tourist sites. Founded in 1964 by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), when East Jerusalem was still part of Jordan, the camp is now home to 11,000 registered refugees, though…

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  • Interview: A day in the life of a Jerusalem refugee camp doctor

    Only one gate exists to enter and exit the Shu'afat refugee camp, a ghetto controlled by Israeli soldiers right inside Jerusalem. Dr. Salim Anati asks how it is possible that only a small minority is still capable of being outraged. By Lorenzo Kamel “Unfortunate is the land in need of heroes.” Bertolt Brecht was right. A land in need of heroes is often a place shrouded in suffering. The interview that follows gives a “silent hero” a voice and alludes to the story of a corner of the world marked by pain. His name is Salim Anati. Occupation: Doctor. His land is the refugee…

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