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Paris attacks

  • In Israel's democracy, dissent has always been off limits to Arab citizens

    The banning of the northern branch of the Islamic Movement may seem like a new low, but a closer look at history reveals how the state has been at war with Palestinian political organizations since its very inception. Israel’s Palestinian citizens have never had an easy time organizing politically. The government’s decision to outlaw the northern branch of the Islamic Movement is only the latest — and perhaps most significant — example of the hurdles Arab citizens must face in their struggle for equality. The state has been pushing for the ban for years, accusing the organization of maintaining links…

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  • Prominent Israeli journalist tweets opportunism at Paris's pain

    There is a tendency on the Israeli right to express Schadenfreude when Europe is targeted by terrorists — especially when the perpetrators are jihadis. The subtext is that Israel is unfairly judged for its policies toward the Palestinians. As social media reporting from Paris increased in pace and volume on Friday, a well-worn pattern emerged. Bursts of incoherent information were followed by news flashes from the wire services and the 24-hour satellite news channels. Rapid sharing of video clips filmed by eyewitnesses with smart phones and quickly uploaded to video sharing platforms like YouTube. As the reports start to repeat…

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  • Israelis hold solidarity vigil with Paris terror victims

    Roughly 2000 Israelis held an impromptu vigil Saturday night for the victims of the Paris terror attacks, in which at least 128 people were killed in seven different incidents. The Tel Aviv Municipality lit up the city hall building in Rabin Square with the French flag. Landmarks around the world were also lit up with the French flag on Saturday. Photos by Yotam Ronen/Activestills.org  

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  • No, Mr. Netanyahu, answers to terrorism are not all the same

    The prime minister compares Israel’s predicament with the Palestinians to France’s current one with jihadists, but the true comparison is to France’s struggle with Algeria in the 1950s and early 1960s. In Paris early this week, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu drove home a message he’s been delivering for decades: "Israel supports Europe in its fight against terrorism, and it's time Europe support Israel in the same exact struggle." But he’s wrong. Europe and Israel are not caught up in the same struggle. They don’t face the same terrorism, either. Despite Netanyahu’s claim, which he says was only reinforced by the…

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  • On being murdered because some people can’t take a joke

    If anything, satire in our society runs the risk of being too safe, of making its targets appear less dangerous than they really are. In cutting them down to size, satire sometimes humanizes as much as it disparages. By Don Futterman This week 17 French citizens were murdered because some people literally can’t take a joke. Artists were martyred for mocking Islam and Islamic extremists, police lost their lives because they were charged with protecting those artists’ right to free speech, and Jews were slain because they were Jews. A joke, for or an instant, inverts the way we look…

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  • The real reason Bibi wants French Jews to move to Israel

    By calling on France's Jews to move to Israel, Netanyahu is promoting a worldview in which there is no national conflict, no occupation and no Palestinian people. There are only Jews and radical Muslims.  The terror attacks in France have caused Netanyahu to, once again, conflate his role as prime minister with his imaginary role as supreme leader of the Jewish people, and call on the Jews of France to immigrate to Israel. Strange. The leader of a country that is constantly in a state of war, and that every few years actually goes to war, is imploring France's Jews to leave…

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