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Muslim Brotherhood

  • The obsession with exposing the 'Muslim mindset'

    After a decade of poor reportage, chaos in the region, and right-wing rule under Netanyahu, the Jewish Israeli public has hardened in its attitudes toward Islam. By Daniel Amir Zvi Yehezkeli is Israel’s Arabist par excellence. After over a decade as head of the Israel Channel 10’s Arab desk, Yehezkeli has become a trusted figure in Israel’s news-heavy culture. He speaks Arabic fluently, and leverages his looks and command of the language to easily blend into Muslim communities around the Middle East, Europe, and North America. In 2012, before the rise of ISIS, Yehezkeli starred in an undercover television documentary series, “Allah…

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  • Palestine's battle for hearts and minds in the Arab world

    A new Palestinian PR campaign attempts to recast the conflict by comparing Israeli violence against Palestinians to methods used by Islamic State. By Jacob Wirtschafter CAIRO — Eager to re-enlist Egyptian public opinion to their cause, the Palestinian Embassy in Cairo hosted a rare press conference Thursday outlining Ramallah’s current diplomatic agenda. The agenda includes a definitive UN Security Council resolution with a timeline for two states, deployment of international forces to protect the population of the West Bank, and an international fact-finding mission to determine the “root causes” of the current phase of the conflict. [tmwinpost] It’s a hard…

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  • In Sisi's Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood are the new Jews

    Weighted down by historical, religious and linguistic inaccuracies, Egyptian television series 'The Jewish Quarter’ nevertheless tells an intriguing story of the political, social and religious changes that have transformed Egypt — in 1948 and in 2015. An Egyptian Ramadan television series called “The Jewish Quarter”* has attracted quite a bit of international media attention for its sympathetic portrayal of Jewish Egyptians during the years immediately following the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, up until 1954. Set in Cairo, the ongoing multi-episode drama takes its name from one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods, where Jews, Muslims and Christians…

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  • Doing God's work: A look at the Islamic Movement in Israel

    It grew out of the Muslim Brotherhood, split into two branches over ideological differences, and is now joining forces with communists, feminists and Jews in the Joint List. This is the surprising story of the Islamic Movement in the Jewish state.  By Dr. Nohad Ali Much has been said in the Israeli media about the union between the four Arab parties leading up to the March 17 election. But while the Jewish-Arab Hadash party, nationalist Balad and Ahmad Tibi's Ta'al are well-known to most Israeli Jews, Ra'am (United Arab List) remains something of a mystery. And when we do hear about…

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  • Why there is no room for diplomacy in Gaza

    With or without a ceasefire, the brutality of the last week will be revisited upon the Palestinians of Gaza – a fact that, unsurprisingly, leaves no room for diplomacy. It should come as no surprise that Hamas Tuesday de facto rejected what by all accounts was an Israeli diktat – disguised as an Egyptian ceasefire proposal – to end Israel's relentless assault on the organization and its base of operations, Gaza. Following a week of near-constant Israeli bombing, the brunt of which has been borne by Palestinian civilians, the Egyptian proposal featured none of the demands on which Hamas had been most vocal, chief…

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  • Three years later, Egypt's revolution coming full circle

    Three years after the revolution that set the benchmark for the Arab Spring, Egypt is now coming full circle, and the promise of the mass movement with it. On the first anniversary of Egypt’s momentous 18-day revolution, the country was still in a state of flux. A powerful military council remained in charge of a transitional government and the outcome of the revolution was unclear, but people were cautiously optimistic of what the future might hold if they kept pushing. By the second anniversary, the Muslim Brotherhood was in power, the country was polarized and in upheaval over the Islamists’…

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  • Banning the Brotherhood: What next for Egypt’s Islamists?

    Months after it was unseated from power, it is unlikely that the Muslim Brotherhood will defeat the military in their current standoff. To end the conflict, both sides will need to move toward a power-sharing solution. By Gillian Kennedy From Cairo to Damascus, Middle Eastern politicians and populaces are keeping a watchful eye on the fate of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood. Last month saw a decisive development in the soap opera world that is Egyptian political life. A court judgement declaring that Egypt’s first democratically elected group is now officially banned. But what does this mean for the behemoth Brotherhood? The…

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  • The Cairo massacre and winner-takes-all politics

    In one of the more insightful comments on the Egyptian military coup, The New Yorker’s George Packer wrote back in July on the political culture of “winner takes all” that dominates the country in the post-Mubarak era. Islamists and secular-minded Egyptians regard one another as obstacles to power, not as legitimate players in a complex game that requires inclusion and consensus. Versions of this mutual negation can be seen across the region, from the liberal mini-uprising in Istanbul’s Taksim Square to the brutality of Syria’s sectarian civil war. Clearly, today’s massacre (is there any other fitting word to describe what…

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  • In Cairo, a demoralizing spectacle

    This time 'people power' returned Egypt to the Mubarak era, only worse. Since I spend most of my writing time denouncing the Israeli public for its rotten political inclinations, I think I have the right to call it as I see it about the Egyptian public, which has really put on a show these last few days. One of the polite hypocrisies of democratic society is that the public, in any country, is fundamentally good, that it wants good things, that it’s entitled to have what it wants, and that when masses of people are suffering and crying out for…

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  • WATCH: Egyptian journalist urges Israelis in Hebrew: Stand up to 'Bibi and Lapid'

    Israel's Channel 10 news anchor Guy Zohar interviewed Egyptian journalist and political activist Heba Abo Seif live from Tahrir Square on Tuesday. Abu Saif, who spoke excellent Hebrew, assured Zohar that the military stands behind the Egyptian nation, and urged the Israeli people to stand up to their own government. She specifically references "Bibi and Lapid," saying that Israelis should not remain silent if they are not getting what they were promised. She also said that Egypt "will never be Syria," referencing the unity between Egyptian nation and the military. Here is the video interview, translated in full (Note it…

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  • Postcards from Tahrir: 'No freedom, bread or social justice'

    As Egypt’s currency continues to fall and the IMF strings for a bailout package that will end fuel and food subsides, popular anger has turned on the country's first democratically elected president. Now, out on the streets of Cairo, protesters are being confronted by the same forces they fought in order to overthrow Mubarak in 2011. By Jesse Rosenfeld CAIRO – Concrete walls have replaced the barbwire at the end of my street, sealing off the banks, the Parliament and western embassies from the rest of Cairo’s downtown. With nothing but lines of riot police and armored vehicles filling the concrete cordon,…

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  • The new Egypt - not so 'dark' after all

    Despite the way it has been depicted in popular Israeli newspapers, the election of the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate for president was less a vote for Islamism than a vote against dictatorship. Since the glory of the Tahrir revolt last January and February, things in Egypt have seemed to go downhill. The young secular idealists who started the protests were displaced by Islamists as leaders of the new Egypt starting the day after Mubarak resigned. Mob violence, including gang rapes, started happening in Tahrir. Bloody soccer riots, burning of Coptic churches, and a parliamentary election in which a more  radical Islamist party finished second to the Muslim Brotherhood - the news from Egypt has not…

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  • Why aren't we up in arms about Jordan's nuclear 'threat'?

    Jordan, Israel's neighbor, has a nuclear program. And, unlike Iran, Jordan and Israel actually have a history of military confrontation.  So why isn't Israel barking? Yes, Israel has a peace treaty with Jordan, but if the Israeli and American hawks set their sights on Jordan's nuclear ambitions, they would shriek that a peace treaty is not enough to secure Israel's future. They would demand Jordan halt its uranium enrichment and dismantle its facilities. If Jordan refused, and insisted that its nuclear program was for civilian purposes - as Iran has - Israeli leaders would threaten that Israel will do what…

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