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legislation

  • Will Israel be in a 'state of emergency' forever?

    The anti-terror law passed through Israel's Knesset last week without one of its scariest pieces, the normalization of administrative detention, which remains dependent on the country's 67-year-old self-declared state of emergency. That could have a bizarre consequence. A new anti-terrorism bill passed by Israel’s Knesset last week may have actually perpetuated the single, looming problem its writers set out to solve — ending Israel’s 67-year state of emergency. The bill is one of many pushed through the Knesset in recent years as part of an effort to eventually revoke the country’s declared state of emergency, initially declared by the British Mandate government in…

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  • Throwing stones, starting fires: Shaked's first bill as justice minister

    A draft law sponsored by Ayelet Shaked would dramatically lower the bar for convicting Palestinians in Jerusalem for throwing stones, and set a penalty of 10 years in prison. The law's application to West Bank settlers is unlikely. A key government committee on Sunday passed a bill that would make it much easier to convict people of throwing stones at moving vehicles, and dramatically increase the punishment generally meted out on stone-throwers. The bill, sponsored by newly appointed Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked (Jewish Home), is effectively a resuscitation of legislation proposed by former Justice Minister Tzipi Livni last November. [tmwinpost]…

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  • Jerusalem bill: A return to anti-democratic legislation?

    By a 5-4 majority, a ministerial committee on Sunday approved a bill that proposes to require 80 Knesset members to approve any negotiations about the future of Jerusalem before the issue can even be discussed in peace talks, as reported by Israeli press. It sounds like a technicality: the bill is far from passing as law, as it still requires a Knesset vote. Although members of the prime minister’s Likud-Beitenu party and Naftali Bennett's Jewish Home party drove support in the committee, Netanyahu himself opposes the bill, reports Times of Israel. Justice Minister Tzipi Livni, who has emerged as the…

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  • Resource: War crimes in Israeli law

    Israel has not yet enacted a law defining war crimes, and the military courts judge soldiers who violate the rules of law according to “regular” offenses. Yesh Din's new report presents the need for Israeli legislation on this subject. The approach currently applied in Israel argues that ordinary domestic legislation is adequate for the prosecution of defendants for actions constituting war crimes. The report reviews international models for legislation criminalizing war crimes and discusses the existing provisions in Israeli law, the policy of the military prosecution, and the rulings of military courts. Yesh Din is a volunteer organization working to…

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  • Israeli government to back law allowing discrimination against Palestinians, ultra-Orthodox

    The Israeli government's Ministerial Committee for Legislation decided today (Sunday) to back a bill by MK Yariv Levin (Likud) which will allow discrimination against Arabs and ultra-Orthodox in employment and real-estate rights. According for the suggested legislation, favoring people who served in the IDF will not be considered discrimination nor will it be challengeable in court. Since Palestinian citizens of Israel are not required to serve in the military and most ultra-Orthodox are exempted from doing so, the new bill will give employers and real-estate owners a legal way to reject Palestinian applicants. Palestinians are underrepresented in almost all areas…

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  • Knesset outlaws political boycott by 48 votes to 37

    The Knesset just passed into law the anti-boycott initiative bill of MK Ze'ev Elkin (Likud), by a majority of 47 to 38. Many Knesset members, including Shas, top Likud members and all of Atzmaut (Ehud Barak's faction) were absent. Netanyahu was also absent from the vote. We hope to have the names of the MKs for you and for posterity soon. As Roi Maor wrote here earlier, ....the law seeks to penalize those who call for boycotting Israel, the settlements, or anyone related to the occupation. If a person, for example, calls for a boycott of academic institutions that participate…

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  • Loyalty laws draw unexpected supporters and opponents

    It is not surprising that Israel Beitenu ("Israel is our home"), the party that ran on the platform of “No Loyalty – No Citizenship” would propose a bill giving preference to those who have served in the IDF or national service when applying for public sector jobs, over those who have not. The bill is considered part of the loyalty/citizenship package. Since it’s mainly Arab citizens who do not perform IDF or national service – and Haredim – the bill represents a sort of reverse affirmative action: give the people who already dominate most of the Israeli public and private…

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  • Burqa ban bill squashed. Now onto real gender equality?

    On Sunday, nrg reported (Heb), a bill that would have banned wearing burqas in certain situations was unanimously opposed by a government Ministerial Committee on legislation. It is not entirely a surprise that the bill was proposed by Kadima MK Marina Solodkin. In proposing this bill, Kadima placed itself even outside the range of hard-line Foreign Minister Lieberman (Heb) who has stated his opposition to such a bill. The issue of burqas is tricky for feminists. Even if I can imagine some logic in the bill’s proposal to ban the burqa in government offices (think courtrooms, or the Interior Ministry),…

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  • Government: No right to attorney for up to a year

    YNET reports this morning  that the ministerial committee for legislation  has voted that the government would endorse a bill allowing courts to deny "security" prisoners right to meet with their attorney for up to a year. Under current legislation, prisoners may be barred from seeing a lawyer for up to three weeks, although various tricks and chicanery sometimes allow security services go way over this time limit. Still, the bill appears to both legitimise and sharply exacerbate an already unacceptable practice, and to delegate huge authority to prison service officials. Ultra-rightist Israel National News, which runs the report under the…

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