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5 Broken Cameras

  • Why this isn't a 'new' intifada

    What we're seeing today is not a new intifada, but an ever-more sophisticated version of the one Palestinians have been fighting all along. In a pre-interview with a television news producer yesterday, I found myself stammering over a familiar question: as a Palestinian, do you have any hope for the future? Steeped in the day-to-day of our "conflict" with Israel, I find it difficult to respond to such banalities - not least because I'm in no position to represent all Palestinians. So after attempting something articulate with the producer, I decided to get in touch with my friend, Emad Burnat, the…

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  • A week in photos: Days of rage

    This week: Anti-Prawer Plan protests from south to north, tear gas weapons on a Bethlehem Christmas tree, a Druze refusenik, a fake fur fashion show, a water break during clashes, an Emmy-winner against the wall, Ethiopians arrested, Al-Araqib endures demolition, Afghan asylum seekers in Europe, and the ongoing humiliations of occupation.  Photos: Activestills.org                                    

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  • Two broken cameras: Destroying the evidence

    IDF soldiers confiscate cameras from a Palestinian photojournalist – and turn them over to a settler. They come back broken. By Yesh Din, written by Yossi Gurvitz One morning last September, Nadel Shafiq Taher Shatiya heard the loudspeakers of the mosque in his Nablus-area village announce that settlers were approaching the village's land. Shatiya, a photojournalist by trade, grabbed two cameras and raced to the scene. Based on his account, when he arrived, several tractors and settlers – who, according to the reports received by Shatiya, came from the nearby settlement of  Elon Moreh – were trying to plough the…

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  • Escaping justice: Who killed Bassem Abu Rahme?

    The IDF insists on not indicting the security officer who killed Bassem Abu Rahme during a demonstration in the West Bank village of Bil'in, despite being provided with enough details to find him. By Yesh Din, written by Yossi Gurvitz In April 2009, during the weekly demonstration in the West Bank village of Bil'in, a uniformed Israeli officer fired a gas canister into the chest of demonstrator Bassem Abu Rahme, killing him. The killing was carried out in the presence of senior officers. Firing a canister at a direct trajectory is contrary to the orders of the IDF itself, not to…

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  • '5 Broken Cameras' director: There is no room for guilt - only taking responsibility

    NEW YORK -- Before Guy Davidi co-directed and produced 5 Broken Cameras, he was involved in Indymedia and an experienced filmmaker. He was also associated with Anarchists Against the Wall, Israeli anti-occupation activists. This is how he came to know the West Bank village of Bil'in, home of the film's co-director, Emad Burnat. "I lived in the village for two months in 2005," he recalled, during a conversation that took place at a coffee shop in New York, where he was promoting the film ahead of the Oscars. "That was an intense time, with the [Palestinian Legislative Council] election. That…

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  • Film on occupation's court system wins big at Sundance

    Just a few hours ago, director Ra’anan Alexandrowicz was inducted into Israel's cinematic Hall of Fame. His film The Law In These Parts won the World Cinema Grand Jury Prize in Documentary at the Sundance Film Festival. Earlier this year, Alexandrowicz picked up the award for best documentary at the Jerusalem Film Festival. The film is a critical investigation of the IDF’s court system governing Palestinians. Through interviews with the judges that engineered and implemented the complicated web of military laws currently in place, Alexandrowicz asks many crucial questions about the occupation.   [vimeo]http://vimeo.com/34886369[/vimeo]   “This is the hardest film…

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