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PHOTOS: Who is and isn't allowed into Jerusalem on Ramadan

Tens of thousands of Palestinians crossed through Israeli checkpoints Friday morning to pray at Al-Aqsa Mosque.

Photos and text by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org

Palestinian women cross Qalandiya checkpoint into Jerusalem's A-Ram neighborhood during the first Friday of Ramadan. The Israeli authorities limited crossing to women, children, and men over the age of 40. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinian women cross Qalandiya checkpoint into Jerusalem’s A-Ram neighborhood during the first Friday of Ramadan. The Israeli authorities limited crossing to women, children, and men over the age of 40. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Thousands of Palestinians from the West Bank crossed through Qalandiya checkpoint on their way to Al-Aqsa Mosque on Friday to mark the first Friday of Ramadan. This year, the Israeli authorities allowed entry to women and girls of all ages, as well as men over 40 and boys under the age of 11. According to various sources, restrictions were eased due to pressure by the Trump administration.

Additionally, small groups of teenagers — who are barred from crossing the checkpoint — tried to cross over the separation barrier adjacent to the checkpoint using ladders. In response, Israeli soldiers crossed into Palestinian territory and confiscated the ladders.

On Thursday Israeli authorities announced that for the first time in a year and a half, a few hundred Palestinian men would be allowed to exit Gaza in organized rides and join the Friday prayers in Al-Aqsa. According to the IDF Spokesperson, since the early hours of the morning approximately 65,000 Palestinians crossed through Israeli checkpoints on their way to pray in Jerusalem.

A Palestinian man and his son are turned away from Qalandiya checkpoint after being forbidden from crossing over to Jerusalem on the first Friday of Ramadan. Entry into the city is limited to women and children, as well as men over 40, June 2, 2017. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

A Palestinian man and his son are turned away from Qalandiya checkpoint after being forbidden from crossing over to Jerusalem on the first Friday of Ramadan. Entry into the city is limited to women and children, as well as men over 40, June 2, 2017. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

Palestinian women cross Qalandiya checkpoint into Jerusalem's A-Ram neighborhood during the first Friday of Ramadan. The Israeli authorities limited crossing to women, children, and men over the age of 40. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinian women cross Qalandiya checkpoint into Jerusalem’s A-Ram neighborhood during the first Friday of Ramadan. The Israeli authorities limited crossing to women, children, and men over the age of 40. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

Palestinian women and children, along with men over the age of 40, walk through Qalandiya checkpoint toward Jerusalem on the first Friday of Ramadan, June 2, 2017. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinian women and children, along with men over the age of 40, walk through Qalandiya checkpoint toward Jerusalem on the first Friday of Ramadan, June 2, 2017. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

Palestinian women cross Qalandiya checkpoint into Jerusalem's A-Ram neighborhood during the first Friday of Ramadan. The Israeli authorities limited crossing to women, children, and men over the age of 40. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinian women cross Qalandiya checkpoint into Jerusalem’s A-Ram neighborhood during the first Friday of Ramadan. The Israeli authorities limited crossing to women, children, and men over the age of 40. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

Palestinian teens take a selfie with the separation wall, next to Qalandiya checkpoint in the West Bank on the first Friday of Ramadan, June 2, 2017. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinians take a selfie with the separation wall, next to Qalandiya checkpoint in the West Bank on the first Friday of Ramadan, June 2, 2017. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

Israeli Border Police officers confiscate a ladder used by Palestinians to climb over the separation barrier into the A-Ram neighborhood of Jerusalem on the first Friday of Ramadan, June 2, 2017. Entry into the city during the holiday is limited to Palestinian women and children, as well as men over 40. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Israeli Border Police officers confiscate a ladder used by Palestinians to climb over the separation barrier into the A-Ram neighborhood of Jerusalem on the first Friday of Ramadan, June 2, 2017. Entry into the city during the holiday is limited to Palestinian women and children, as well as men over 40. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

This post is also published in Hebrew on Local Call.

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    COMMENTS

    1. Itshak Gordin Halevy

      The traffic in Jerusalem has been restricted due to this Ramadan which will last 30 days. Double standards: the Muslims can come and disturb us but we Jews cannot pray at our holy Mount.

      Reply to Comment
      • Peace & LOVE

        PEACE

        Reply to Comment
      • Ben

        There there, you poor thing. It’s so hard being a true Lord of the Land. A Ha-Levy, not a Gideon-Levy. The indignities you have to put up with from the peasants these days. Imagine, a hereditary priest-king kinda guy like you having to wait in traffic. Who heard of such a thing? When you and your sons oughta be heading in a motorcade with escort–zoom!– to your swift appointment with destiny, to ritually sacrifice goats on the highest expanses of the Temple Mount. With trumpets! In your glory.
        https://www.google.com/amp/www.newsweek.com/why-do-jewish-activists-keep-trying-sacrifice-goats-jerusalems-old-city-583433%3Famp%3D1

        Reply to Comment
    2. Mark

      Why no picture(s) of the Palestinian women and men over 40 actually at the Al-Aksa mosque and in Haram al-Sharif?

      Reply to Comment
    3. i_like_ike52

      It is interesting that before Oslo in 1993, during the period of “full occupation” the Palestinians had much freer access across the Green Line, including Gaza. It was the Oslo “peace process” which enabled the Palestinian leadership under both Arafat and HAMAS to launch a bloody terror war using suicide bombers against Israel and which caused the need for more stringent security measures by Israel. The Palestinians have only their own leadership to thank for the difficulties they now face in crossing the line into Jerusalem.

      Reply to Comment
      • Ben

        Of course you know that the awful violence that happened and could happen again is the ONLY thing that has stayed Israel from letting its settlers go more hog-wild that they already have gone. You know of course that had Palestinians never ever been violent, had they protested peacefully and tried only to negotiate, the Israelis would have patted them on the head and laughed, talked endlessly, and all the while swallowed the West Bank all that much more quickly. Read Noam Scheizaf in these pages: “Why do we only listen to violence?”
        https://972mag.com/why-do-we-only-listen-to-violence/117773/

        Also, as Sheizaf has convincingly argued, Oslo IS the occupation:

        “…regardless of the things Oslo was meant to be, it’s clear – and way more important – what it has become: the primary legal tool serving the occupation.
        The agreement over the division of the land – handing the large urban areas to the Palestinians, the rural villages to Palestinian “administrative control,” and the rest to Israel – is now being treated by Israel as the de-facto annexation of 60 percent of the West Bank, also known as Area C. (The situation of the Palestinians in areas A and B is not much better: they need Israel’s approval to travel outside the West Bank and sometimes even within it, and they suffer from what has become the tiny tyranny of the Palestinian Authority.)
        In Area C, Israel is building new settlements, universities and cultural centers; excavating natural resources and using them on the Israeli market; and displacing thousands of Palestinians living there – a massive human and civil rights violation that is condemned by the international community but at the same time accepted and even enabled by the insistence on keeping the Oslo Accords as the main diplomatic and legal framework on the ground. All those nice diplomats working so hard to save Oslo and the peace process are really saving the occupation.”

        Reply to Comment

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