+972 Magazine's Stories of the Week

Directly In Your Inbox

Analysis News
Visit our Hebrew site, "Local Call" , in partnership with Just Vision.

PHOTOS: In Rio, protests against World Cup mark Stonewall riots

Football can be a tool for social change, one protester says, but the poor people here cannot even participate in the games. ‘We are not just LGBT. We are also workers, blacks, women and we can not disconnect from the other social movement.’

Photos & text: Keren Manor and Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org

Activists take part in a demonstration against the world cap also marking 45 years to the Stone Wall attack, June 28, 2014.  (Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the world cap also marking 45 years to the Stone Wall attack, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. (Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org)

RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil — A few hours before the dramatic game between Brazil and Chile in the World Cup on Saturday, thousand of demonstrators marched past the FIFA Fan Fest on the Copacaban beach of Rio de Janeiro, the second in a series of actions dubbed, “Our cup is on the street.” In addition to protesting the World Cup, the event had another purpose. Saturday was the 45th anniversary of the Stonewall Inn riots, which are credited with launching the modern LGBT rights movement. To commemorate Stonewall, organizers turned the event into an anti-homophobia march in addition to its social agenda.

At first glance, the march appeared to be a fun and colorful gay pride parade but the signs and the slogans told a more complex story, one protesters explained is inseparable from the context of the World Cup and the oppression of gender, sexuality, race and class.

Activists take part in a demonstration against the world cap also marking 45 years to the Stone Wall attack, June 28, 2014. The sign reads: "we want to be champions in health, education and safety. not just in football". (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years since the Stonewall riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. The sign reads: “We want to be champions in health, education and safety. Not just in football”. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the world cap also marking 45 years to the Stone Wall attack, June 28, 2014. "Choque de amor"- choque is the police anti protest troops. letters means: "troops of love".  (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years since the Stonewall riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. “Choque de amor”. Choque is the police anti-protest unit. The signs translate to: “Troops of love”. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Jobe, an activist from Niteroi, a city in the state of Rio de Janeiro explained:

We are not just LGBT. We are also workers, blacks, women and we can not disconnect from the other social movement. We need to come together and join forces. I don’t want my taxes to be invested in these games but rather in social services like health, education, public transportation and housing rights. We are not against football but the World Cup is good for enterprises that come to Brazil and exploit it.

The government evicted thousands of people from their homes so that the foreigners could have a nice reception. All the changes in the city were made for the foreigners, because they have the money. It is not being done for the good of the people in the street. The minimum salary here is around 720 reals (240 euros or $330). The poor people cannot even participate in this event.

Football, and every other sport, can be use as a tool for social change; we could be here on the street, playing football and enjoying ourselves. Football is also a tool of resistance for those people who don’t have much opportunity in life. FIFA commercialize and privatizes football, therefore promoting inequality.

Activists take part in a demonstration against the world cap also marking 45 years to the Stone Wall attack, June 28, 2014.  (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the world cap also marking 45 years to the Stone Wall attack, June 28, 2014.  (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Jobe holds sign during a demonstration against the world cap also marking 45 years to the Stone Wall attack, June 28, 2014.  (Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org)

Jobe (interviewed) holds a sign during the demonstration, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 28, 2014. (Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,  June 28, 2014. (Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,  June 28, 2014. (Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,  June 28, 2014. (Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,  June 28, 2014. (Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org)

Activists take part in a demonstration against the World Cup also marking 45 years to since the Stonewall Inn riots, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil,  June 28, 2014. (Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org)


Related:

PHOTOS: In wake of protests, Turkey holds pride parade
Pushed aside, Israeli gay rights movement searches for footing

For additional original analysis and breaking news, visit +972 Magazine's Facebook page or follow us on Twitter. Our newsletter features a comprehensive round-up of the week's events. Sign up here.

  • LEAVE A COMMENT

    * Required

    COMMENTS

    1. It is good to know that all of the nut jobs are not located in the middle east. Protesting football in Brazil makes as much sense as protesting the Olympics, the Superbowl, the World Series or the Stanley Cup Finals.

      Reply to Comment
      • William Burns

        All of which make a lot of sense, particularly the Olympics. If sports are so popular, why do they require massive government subsidies?

        Reply to Comment
      • JG

        Okay, we can consider PseudoLeft’s knowledge of Brazil is as bad as his knowledge in things regarding Palestine.
        Expectable.

        Reply to Comment
      • Edward

        Because they are leveling the Shacks to “clean up” Rio for the olympics.

        Reply to Comment
      • Jayjaydee

        To the person who said that protesting football in Brazil makes as much sense as protesting the Olympics, Super Bowl, World Series and Stanley cup..that makes not one bit of sense…explain how the Super Bowl is bad? How is the Stanley cup bad? You are out of your element man if people in Brazil want change then they can do what we as Americans did and fight for their rights…also if you are unhappy to be making 300 dollars then go and save up that 300 slowly and get an education online or in another country…buenos aires has excellent schooling programs in Argentina….when there’s a will there’s a way…don’t ever try and say it makes sense to protest the Super Bowl which generals money for the economy and the Stanley cup which is not even that popular would be pointless to protest. Foolish comment

        Reply to Comment