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PHOTOS: Gaza's half-million internally displaced

Photos by: Basel Yazouri and Anne Paq/Activestills.org
Text by: Ryan Rodrick Beiler

Palestinians recover belongings from the Khuza'a neighborhood following bombardment by Israeli forces, Gaza Strip, August 3, 2014. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Palestinians recover belongings from the Khuza’a neighborhood following bombardment by Israeli forces, Gaza Strip, August 3, 2014. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

The most commonly cited statistic from Gaza is the death toll, now rising past 1,814, according to UN figures. Such numbers can be numbing, as absorbing the reality of so many faces and names is impossible. Yet another staggering figure that is difficult to comprehend is the number of people displaced from their homes, which the UN estimates at 520,000.

Gaza’s half-million displaced residents are one of the most obvious refutations of the the accusation that Hamas uses “human shields.” The Guardian has reported “large numbers of people fleeing different neighborhoods… and no evidence that Hamas had compelled them to stay.” Similarly, The Independent writes that, “Some Gazans have admitted that they were afraid of criticizing Hamas, but none have said they had been forced by the organization to stay in places of danger and become unwilling human shields.”

For its part, the Israeli military has attempted to absolve itself from accusations of war crimes through elaborate measures to warn people living in areas under imminent threat of attack, often in border areas, by dropping leaflets, sending automated voice messages, texts, or in the case of more targeted strikes, even personal phone calls or the so-called “knock-on-roof” unarmed warning missile.

Michael Sfard, writing in Haaretz points out that this military doctrine:

….does not take into consideration the question of whether the prior warning given the population is effective – i.e., whether the population can in fact leave, whether solutions have been found for the elderly, the ill and the children. Nor is it accompanied by the creation of a safe corridor through which people can flee to someplace that won’t be fired on, and where civilians have what they need to survive. The terrifying result of this combat doctrine, in both Cast Lead and Protective Edge, was piles of bodies of women, children and men who weren’t involved in the fighting.

Amnesty International puts it more concisely: “Deliberately attacking a civilian home is a war crime, and the overwhelming scale of destruction of civilian homes, in some cases with entire families inside them, points to a distressing pattern of repeated violations of the laws of war.”

But while the shocking criminality of these practices has contributed to 1,176 civilian deaths in Gaza to date, displaced survivors are now faced with the challenge of enduring further suffering after their homes and much of their worldly possessions have been destroyed. During brief lulls in the fighting, some have ventured back to their homes to retrieve belongings or search for bodies. Many continue to exist in UNRWA schools, which themselves have come under attack on numerous occasions, shattering what fragile sense of security those already displaced may have sought in such shelters.

All of which points to the most common-sense human response to Israel’s “warnings” – echoed by satirical news anchor Jon Stewart:

What are Gazans supposed to do? Evacuate to where? Have you f*cking seen Gaza? Israel blocked this border, Egypt blocked this border. What, are you supposed to swim for it?

 

Nahed Daoud, age 41, are staying in an UNRWA school for four days since his family evacuated after Israeli warnings that their neighbors would be bombed, July 16, 2014. Since fleeing, according to Nahed, the Israeli air force bombed their neighbor's house, badly damaging his house. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Nahed Daoud, age 41, has been staying in an UNRWA school for four days since his family evacuated after Israeli warnings that their neighbors would be bombed, July 16, 2014. Since fleeing, according to Nahed, the Israeli air force bombed their neighbor’s house, badly damaging his house. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org) 

Palestinians stand in front of the entrance of Remal Elementary UNRWA School which is used as a temporary shelter by Palestinians living in the Norther part of the Gaza Strip, Gaza City on July 13, 2014. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Palestinians stand in front of the entrance of Remal Elementary UNRWA School, which is used as a temporary shelter by Palestinians living in the Norther part of the Gaza Strip, Gaza City on July 13, 2014. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Displaced Palestinians in UNRWA school, at the first day of Eid, Gaza City, July 28, 2014. 83 UNRWA schools turned into shelters , as also many hospitals all over the strip. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Displaced Palestinians in an UNRWA school, on the first day of Eid, Gaza City, July 28, 2014. 83 UNRWA schools turned into shelters, as were many hospitals, all over the Strip. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Palestinians who flew from Israeli attacks take refuge in Falluja governmental school, Jabaliya refugee camp, July 29, 2014. Many Palestinians flew their homes a night before  after having recceived orders to evacuate. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Palestinians who fled from Israeli attacks take refuge in Falluja governmental school, Jabaliya refugee camp, July 29, 2014. Many Palestinians fled their homes the previous night after having received orders to evacuate. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Displaced Palestinians in the first day of Eid, Gaza, July 28, 2014. 83 UNRWA schools turned into shelters, as also many hospitals all over the strip. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Displaced Palestinians on the first day of Eid, Gaza, July 28, 2014. 83 UNRWA schools turned into shelters, as did many hospitals, all over the Strip. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

A Palestinian family from Abasan sit under a tree next to Khan Yunis hospital. The family stayed for 10 days under this tree, after they had to flee from their home due to the Israeli attack. Gaza Strip, July 24, 2014. At least 200,000 Palestinians have been displaced. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

A Palestinian family from Abasan sits under a tree next to Khan Younis hospital. The family stayed under the tree for 10 days after they had to flee  their home due to the Israeli attack. Gaza Strip, July 24, 2014. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Palestinian women retrieve what belongings they can carry from their homes in Beit Hanoun, North Gaza, August 4, 2014. They had returned to their homes to quickly salvage what they could during a short ceasefire. Most Beit Hanoun residents had fled the heavily bombed areas and have been staying in UNRWA schools or with relatives. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Palestinian women retrieve what belongings they can carry from their homes in Beit Hanoun, North Gaza, August 4, 2014. They had returned to their homes to quickly salvage what they could during a short ceasefire. Most Beit Hanoun residents fled the heavily bombed areas and have been staying in UNRWA schools or with relatives. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Palestinians collect their belongings in Shujaiyeh, a neighborhood in the east of Gaza City, during a ceasefire, July 27, 2014. During the ceasefire on 26 July, many Palestinians went back to Shujaiyeh to inspect the damages together with medics who attempted to rescue injured or collect bodies. Dozens of bodies were collected but many remain as Palestinians do not have all the necessary equipment to dig. Israeli attacks turned the neighborhood into a scene of utter devastation, with entire buildings flattened and thousands forced to flee. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Palestinians collect their belongings in Shujaiyeh, a neighborhood in the east of Gaza City, during a ceasefire, July 27, 2014. During the ceasefire on July 26, many Palestinians went back to Shujaiyeh to inspect the damages together with medics who attempted to rescue the injured or collect bodies. Dozens of bodies were collected but many remain as Palestinians do not have all the necessary equipment to dig. Israeli attacks turned the neighborhood into a scene of utter devastation, with entire buildings flattened and thousands forced to flee. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Palestinians collect water in Shati' Refugee Camp, Gaza City, August 2, 2014. according to OCHA, 1.5 million People not in shelters have no or extremely restricted access to water in Gaza. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Palestinians collect water in Shati’ Refugee Camp, Gaza City, August 2, 2014. According to OCHA, 1.5 million people not taking refuge in shelters have no or extremely restricted access to water in Gaza. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Palestinians salvage some of their belongings and take them out of the village of Khuza'a, east of Khan Younis August 1, 2014. Hundreds of residents returned to Khuza'a at the beginning of a ceasefire to recover bodies and salvage possessions. Khuza'a has been cut off from the rest of Gaza Strip and occupied by Israeli soldiers. A large number of residents have been killed and injured, and many homes were destroyed. Most residents fled the Israeli attacks.  (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Palestinians salvage some of their belongings from the village of Khuza’a, east of Khan Younis August 1, 2014. Hundreds of residents returned to Khuza’a at the beginning of a ceasefire to recover bodies and salvage possessions. Khuza’a has been cut off from the rest of the Gaza Strip and occupied by Israeli soldiers. A large number of residents have been killed and injured, and many homes were destroyed. Most residents fled the Israeli attacks. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Displaced Palestinians in the first day of Eid, in a classroom of UNRWA school that had become a shelter, Gaza, July 28, 2014. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Displaced Palestinians on the first day of Eid, in a classroom of an UNRWA school that had become a shelter, Gaza, July 28, 2014. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

The family of Amal Al-Athamna, from Beit Hanoun, stays in a store near Kamal Edwan Hospital, Jabalyia, Gaza Strip, July 24. Beit Hanoun has been heavily bombed since the beginning of the Israeli assault and many people left the area. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

The family of Amal Al-Athamna, from Beit Hanoun, stays in a store near Kamal Edwan Hospital, Jabalyia, Gaza Strip, July 24. Beit Hanoun has been heavily bombed since the beginning of the Israeli assault and many people left the area. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Displaced Palestinians find refuge in Jabaliya school, Jabaliya refugee camp, Gaza Strip, July 28, 2014. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Displaced Palestinians find refuge in Jabaliya school, Jabaliya refugee camp, Gaza Strip, July 28, 2014. (Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Palestinians look over Khuza'a neighborhood following bombardment by Israeli forces, Gaza Strip, August 3, 2014. Khuza'a came under heavy shelling on Monday night, July 21st. Israeli army ordered all the inhabitants of the village, nearly 10,000 people to leave. Khuza'a remined a closed military zone, and only International Committe of the Red Cross managed to secure a few brief incusions into the village to evacuate some of the injured, killed and the civilians. Most residents flew the village but some stayed behind. (Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Palestinians look over Khuza’a neighborhood following bombardment by Israeli forces, Gaza Strip, August 3, 2014. Khuza’a came under heavy shelling on Monday night, July 21. The Israeli army ordered all the inhabitants of the village, nearly 10,000 people to leave. Khuza’a remained a closed military zone, and only the International Committee of the Red Cross managed to secure a few brief entries into the village to evacuate some of the injured, killed and other civilians. Most residents fled the village but some stayed behind.
(Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org)

Related:
Refugees once again: Gazans who lost their home wonder what’s next
Dispatch from Gaza: Disaster zone
Gazans recover belongings, bodies during short-lived ceasefire
Deadly week in Gaza

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    COMMENTS

    1. Whiplash

      AI has no clue what it is talking about. Civilian structures, including houses, used in the course of a military campaign are legal targets.

      Hamas cannot use civilians and civilians structures military assets and shields to their operations without those structures becoming military targets. Israel soldiers report that rows of houses and other buildings were booby trapped with explosives. The IDF had a picture of two explosives wired a meter from a child’s crib in one house. 3 Israeli soldiers died when explosives detonated in a UN medical clinic.

      The Gazan’s military machine was woven into the fabric of civilian areas and could not be taken out without causing collateral damage to civilians.

      Gaza is like a murderer which wants orphan benefits after he has killed his parents. Gazans knew what the price of their crimes was, yet they attacked Israel attempting to kill Israeli citizens. Now they are suffering the consequences of their actions.

      Reply to Comment
    2. Goldmarx

      “Hamas cannot use civilians and civilians structures military assets and shields to their operations without those structures becoming military targets.”

      Are there any non-civilian areas that Hamas can use that would satisfy you?

      Reply to Comment
      • Whiplash

        Hamas has military and training bases in former Jewish communities in Gaza. They could have located all their operations there. Or they could have located their military operations in the farmland of Gaza away from the Urban complexes of Gaza. They did not do so, because they wanted the protection of human and civilian structures to act as human shields who and which would be killed or destroyed and used in Hamas’ propaganda war of flatten structures and dead civilians.

        Hamas completely ignores the obligation of making themselves distinct from civilians. They hide in civilian areas in civilian clothes firing weapons of deadly force. Israel not only has the right to but has the obligation to attack the fighters who are attempting to do lethal harm to them.

        Reply to Comment
        • Goldmarx

          “Hamas has military and training bases in former Jewish communities in Gaza.”

          –>Well, since it has at least SOME of its military there, then this contradicts your later statement that “Hamas completely ignores the obligation of making themselves distinct from civilians”

          “Or they could have located their military operations in the farmland of Gaza away from the Urban complexes of Gaza.”

          –>The farmlands are necessary to grow food. If Hamas launched rockets from there, Israel would target the food supply as a military target, causing immediate mass starvation. Then Israel could claim that Hamas made them do it.

          “Hamas completely ignores the obligation of making themselves distinct from civilians.”

          –> Gazan civilians are not compelled to do reserve duty in the armed forces. Israeli civilians are, rendering the distinction between Israeli adult civilians and soldiers downright blurry, if not nonexistent.

          The IDF Command Center is in the very urban Tel Aviv, very close to a hospital. By your logic, the hospital is a legitimate military target since it is ‘in the vicinity’ of the Command Center.

          Reply to Comment
      • JohnW

        “Are there any non-civilian areas that Hamas can use that would satisfy you?”

        Is there anything that Hamas can do after which you would stop your habit of making excuses for them?

        Reply to Comment
        • Goldmarx

          “Is there anything that Hamas can do after which you would stop your habit of making excuses for them?”

          I’m not making excuses, just telling the truth. I’m with Noam Shalit (Gilad’s father).

          Is there anything that the current Israeli government would do after which you would stop your habit of making excuses for them?

          Reply to Comment
          • JohnW

            “Is there anything that the current Israeli government would do after which you would stop your habit of making excuses for them?”

            Funny that, Arabs make excuses for what they do, including excusing Hamas. People like me make excuses for what WE do.

            But you, a supposed Zionist, make excuses for Hamas.

            So which one of us is a Zionist? You or me Goldie?

            PS: I posted another post in reply to Goldmarx’s other points in his post. I posted it twice but it seems to have been suppressed. Why?

            I had two links in it which showed what Noam Shalit really advocates. And another one which showed what one of the convicted terrorist who was released in exchange for Gilad Shalit, did to one of our policemen, Mizrahi. He murdered him.

            Nothing offensive just facts. Why suppress facts?

            Reply to Comment
          • Goldmarx

            “People like me make excuses for what WE do…But you, a supposed Zionist, make excuses for Hamas…
            So which one of us is a Zionist? You or me Goldie?”

            So your litmus test for Zionism is making excuses for the government that speaks in your name? My country right or wrong?

            I don’t make excuses for anybody. If, in this war, the truth favors Israel’s creation, Hamas, more that Israel, then that’s the way it is. Perhaps in the next war, it will work out the reverse, and I’ll have no problem calling it that way.

            What kind of Zionist am I? A left Zionist who supports the BDS movement. Like several of the journalists who report and write here.

            Reply to Comment
          • JohnW

            “So your litmus test for Zionism is making excuses for the government that speaks in your name? My country right or wrong?”

            Why are you pretending that Hamas has been at war with just this Israeli government?

            Hamas has been at war with every Israeli government for the last 35 years.

            “I don’t make excuses for anybody. If, in this war, the truth favors (NOT Israel’s creation) Hamas, more that Israel, then that’s the way it is.”

            Hamas clearly states that it wants to destroy Israel and it acts on what it says. So the truth is not in Hamas’s favor. Unless you share their vision, Goldie. In which case you are not a Zionist.

            “Perhaps in the next war, it will work out the reverse, and I’ll have no problem calling it that way.”

            Why should there be a next war? All Hamas has to do is come to terms with Israel’s existence and prove that it means it.

            “What kind of Zionist am I? A left Zionist who supports the BDS movement. Like several of the journalists who report and write here.”

            Ah, ok, so your criteria is to support something because some names you are impressed with do so? Have you heard of the idea of thinking for yourself instead?

            Reply to Comment
          • JohnW

            “I’m not making excuses, just telling the truth. I’m with Noam Shalit (Gilad’s father).”

            You are making excuses for Hamas. And you are name dropping. Here is what Noam Shalit says:

            “We must defend ourselves,” says Noam Shalit. Even if, as it is said, he still hasn’t forgiven Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for having waited so long to secure his son’s freedom, Shalit supports the government in the struggle against “the terror of Hamas rockets.” The situation in the south has become “unbearable” for people because of the incessant rocket attacks, he says.”

            Yes, he also says that we must negotiate with Hamas. He does not say give in to Hamas. And right now, Hamas is only willing to negotiate about what they want. About the blockade. Moreover, they don’t even want to negotiate face to face with us because according to them we have no right to exist. That isn’t negotiating. That is getting advantage by dictating terms.

            I am all for negotiating with Hamas when they agree to negotiate everything. Including a final peace treaty. In the meanwhile, we too negotiate like Hamas. We negotiate on what suits us. For example the release of 1027 terrorists with blood on their hand for Gilad Shalit.
            As a matter of interest, since his release, one of the released terrorists, murdered an Israeli policeman, Baruch Mizrahi. Here, read about it:

            That’s the kind of deal we get from Hamas when we get carried away negotiating with them. Ain’t so good is it??

            Reply to Comment
          • Goldmarx

            You imply that Noam Shalit made those comments about the current conflict; actually they are from 2012:

            http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/former-hostage-gilad-shalit-and-his-father-on-israel-conflict-with-gaza-a-869381.html

            “Shalit wants to campaign on a slogan that stems from his own experience: “We have to negotiate with Hamas.” After all, he says, negotiation led to success in his son’s case. Why then, he asks, shouldn’t it be tried a second time?”

            And then there’s this:
            http://www.jewishpress.com/indepth/knesset/knesset-corner/noam-shalits-first-political-interview/2012/03/19/

            “In discussing Hamas, Shalit announced that he would talk with them if they agreed to it, and he would even shake the hands of Gilad’s kidnappers, also saying he would kidnap Israeli soldiers if he was a Palestinian.”

            And this:
            http://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/mar/15/gilad-shalit-father-kidnap-israel

            “Shalit added that the kidnapping of Israeli soldiers by Hamas militants was comparable to the techniques used by Israeli paramilitary fighters the Haganah against the British, arguing “we also kidnapped British soldiers when we were fighting for our freedom”.

            Since when does ‘namedropping’ mean that one agrees with everything the cited person thinks? It’s impressive enough for a person in his position to say enough things that I agree with to not fall apart and become a raging war hawk like JohnW.

            J: “Yes, he also says that we must negotiate with Hamas. He does not say give in to Hamas.”

            –>And neither do I.

            J: Moreover, they don’t even want to negotiate face to face with us because according to them we have no right to exist.

            –>Nope. During negotiations held during the recently-ended 72 hour ceasefire, the Israeli delegation refused to be in the same room as the Palestinian delegation because it contained Hamas members. The Hamas members had no such objections to being in the same room as the Israelis.

            Reply to Comment
          • Goldmarx

            G:“So your litmus test for Zionism is making excuses for the government that speaks in your name? My country right or wrong?”

            J: Why are you pretending that Hamas has been at war with just this Israeli government?

            –> Why didn’t you answer the question I posed, dodging it by making another unfounded accusation?

            J: Hamas clearly states that it wants to destroy Israel and it acts on what it says.

            –> Offering ten year truces and observing a years-long ceasefire from Nov 2012 through April 2014 is not “acting on what it says.”

            J:”Why should there be a next war? All Hamas has to do is come to terms with Israel’s existence and prove that it means it.”

            And what does that mean exactly? There is nothing that the Gaza government can do or say that couldn’t be dismissed as another word game by an Israeli government bent on war and occupation.

            J: “Ah, ok, so your criteria is to support something because some names you are impressed with do so? Have you heard of the idea of thinking for yourself instead?”

            –> As usual, no. I note that others happen to think like me as a way of drawing attention to your unwillingness to attack them the way you have attacked me.

            Reply to Comment
    3. There are several questions here:
      1. Did the destruction of these neighborhoods and collateral civilian casualties accomplish anything militarily necessary? Or, was this simply action taken under the Israeli operational theory that the Gazan population will think like Steven and blame Hamas for the destruction (a bad theory in my mind – I believe that wanton destruction like this only creates more Hamas followers and sympathizers)
      2. Strategically, I believe that the IDF and Israeli government should consider how this might affect the country going forward. This will almost certainly advance the cause of BDS – at least in Europe if not the US. It also could well lead to a third intifada. As readers of +972 probably know, there have been very few killings of Israelis in the West Bank over the last several years (in large part because of the security cooperation between Israeli security and Palestinian Authority security)(as a matter of fact there was a period of over a year which only ended this spring, when there were ZERO killings of Israelis by Palestinians in the West Bank) – however, if a Third Intifada develops, this could change dramatically increasing the death toll of Israelis from this war. For example, presumably, the killing of the policeman in Jerusalem yesterday should be added to the casualty list of this war on the Israeli side.

      Reply to Comment
      • Whiplash

        Mark, you asked if Israel gained any military advantage in the destruction of neighborhoods in Gaza. The answer is yes. Hamas engaged in war making a military response necessary. Israel greatly reduced attacks out of these neighborhoods and reduced the abililty of Hamas to wage war. Israel destroyed missile launchers, missile storage facilities, arm and weapons caches, eliminated terror tunnels, removed booby trapped houses and other buildings, and destroyed Hamas and Islamic Command posts. In addition Israel killed a large number of Hamas and Islamic Jihad fighters. The death and destruction will make it difficult for Hamas to recover their fighting abilities in these neighborhoods.

        Reply to Comment
      • Whiplash

        Mark, re BDS and 3rd Intifada

        BDS only has potential to harm individual Israelis and businesses. BDS has been a colossal failure. It has no impact on the overall economy. Israel is a preferred trading partner of many nations and its trade has expanded greatly in the last decade. For instance, trade with India is expected to expand to ten billion dollars in the next five years because of the free trade agreement signed with that country.

        BDS has no chance of success. The United States is never going to boycott trade with Israel.

        RE third intifada

        No one really knows if Palestinians in the West Bank are prepared to give up the progress they have made since the end of the last intifada. Having to live with the consequences of the second intifada and seeing the consequences of Gaza War III should be enough incentive for Palestinians to avoid a third intifada. The Palestinians should have no doubt what awaits them should they engage in a third intifada. Setting aside the death, destruction, closing of the Israeli marketplace to Palestinian labor and goods and the crushing of their economy, the Palestinians risk that Israel will annex area “C” and end any chance of a Palestinian state.

        Reply to Comment
    4. Richard

      This is very sad – hopefully Hamas will use the next batch of concrete to rebuilt these peoples’ homes and not to build tunnels.

      Reply to Comment
      • Joel

        Hamas used those tunnels as private bomb shelters, while regular Gazans suffered and died above ground.

        Reply to Comment
    5. Sabra77

      I am an Israeli. I served in the army there and lost many friends. And few things are more annoying than right-wing American Jews spouting off when it’s not them or their loved ones on the line. This most recent bombing of Gaza was barbaric, and we will live to regret it for many years. I am as glad as anyone that those 32 tunnels were destroyed. But you don’t have to flatten 10,000 houses and kill 400 children to destroy some tunnels. That was both shameful and stupid.

      Reply to Comment
      • JohnW

        You are entitled to your opinion Sabra. But you only speak for yourself. Not for the rest of us. Most of the rest of us don’t find American Jews, who support us, annoying. We do find the other kind of American Jews who try to lecture us about how to defend ourselves and lecture us about what to do or not do. But those American Jews are in the minority. And you too represent the minority opinion here in Israel.

        Reply to Comment
        • Sabra77

          Yup. Those who saved Jews during the Holocaust were also a minority. I am happy to be in that kind of minority.

          Reply to Comment
          • JohnW

            Good for you. I actually respect that. But I still disagree.

            I disagree because right now we are the stronger party, at least militarily. Not politically. And we are fighting against Hamas who would like nothing more than to perpetrate another holocaust against us.

            And you know what? If we continue to fight on their terms, they may come closer to succeeding, even though they will never succeed again. Nevertheless, if they come close, you will find history repeating itself: those who will save Jews will again be in the minority.

            We can only rely on ourselves. Noone else. I don’t like to cause suffering to others either but if the choice is between their suffering and ours. As far as I am concerned, they will be the ones who will suffer.

            Reply to Comment
    6. Joel

      I’m still waiting for 972Mag to publish one photo of an armed Hamasnik.

      I mean, you guys had a whole month. Five foreign journalists were there.

      Still waitin’.

      Reply to Comment
      • Joel

        *five hundred

        Reply to Comment
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