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Palestinian poet Dareen Tatour set free

Dareen Tatour, who was arrested and jailed for poems she published on social media, is released from prison. Tatour: ‘It will be impossible to stop my writing.’

By Oren Ziv

Palestinian poet Dareen Tatour was released from prison on September 20, 2018. She was arrested in October 2015, and later convicted of incitement to terrorism and violence for poems she published on social media. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinian poet Dareen Tatour was released from prison on September 20, 2018. She was arrested in October 2015, and later convicted of incitement to terrorism and violence for poems she published on social media. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinian poet Dareen Tatour was released today after serving 42 days in prison. Her five-month sentence was reduced by 97 days, the same amount of time she spent in jail following her arrest in October 2015, before being transferred to house arrest for nearly three years.

“I am very happy to be free, finally, after three years. These were three years of suffering, but I am free now,” said Tatour upon her release.

Tatour, who hails from the village of Reineh near Nazareth, was convicted of incitement to terrorism and violence over a poem she published on her personal Facebook page, titled “Qawem Ya Sha’abi, Qawemhum” (“Resist my people, resist them”), as well as two other social media posts. The poet has become a symbol of the rise of state surveillance of social media.

Tatour was released one day earlier than expected, which came as a surprise to the family and friends who arrived to greet her upon her release. Her father, Tawfik Tatour, who had only seen his daughter once since she was detained in early August, said he did not expect to get a call the night before, informing him of the early release. “It is a joy, I am extremely excited,” he said. A celebration of Tatour’s release will take place on Friday, and her father invites the public to join.

Family and friends greet Palestinian poet Dareen Tatour upon her release from prison on September 20, 2018. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Family and friends greet Palestinian poet Dareen Tatour upon her release from prison on September 20, 2018. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Throughout her trial, the state summoned a string of experts on poetry and the Arabic language to analyze the words of a young poet who was mostly anonymous until her arrest.

Tatour promised to keep writing. “I regret being sent to prison for a poem, but it will be impossible to stop my writing,” she said.

This article was first published in Hebrew on Local Call. Read it here.

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    COMMENTS

    1. Sheikh Yahudi

      What a disgusting human being. The same goes for her admirers.

      Reply to Comment
    2. itshak Gordine

      A woman covered and submissive. What a shame..

      Reply to Comment
      • john

        i thought you preferred your minorities submissive.

        Reply to Comment
        • itshak Gordine

          I can not stand seeing a submissive woman. On the other hand, minorities must respect country laws. It’s valid everywhere in the world, including Israel

          Reply to Comment
          • john

            i understand muslim women cannot submit to god without violating your tastes, but why bother distinguishing the fact she’s a woman from the fact she’s a minority as well as a dissident poet? it’s her poetry after all that you object to, ostensibly more than her religion or gender.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            Halevy you are simply amazing. Dareen Tatour is the OPPOSITE of being submissive in the way YOU WANT her to be submissive, but you are on a high horse about her being “submissive” because of the way she dresses and practices her religion–ye who tout your own religion as lodestar. And pay attention to what Jan writes, below. Halevy, your ugliness and your hypocrisy are astonishing to me. I feel you are obtuseness personified.

            Reply to Comment
      • Jan

        If she was submissive she would have submitted to the cruelties of the occupation. She is covered because she wants to be covered. That is her choice. I know several Muslim women, two who are converts to Islam. Some cover and some don’t cover. The woman who converted from Judaism chose to be covered. No one ordered her to convert and no one ordered her to cover her head.
        Many ultra orthodox Jewish women cover their head or wear wigs. I don’t hear people shaming them or saying that they are submissive. The grandmother of my husband shaved her head and covered her bald shaved head with a wig. Now that is disgusting.

        Reply to Comment