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Israel's one-state reality is sowing chaos in American politics

Until U.S. lawmakers and major Jewish organizations adjust to the current one-state reality, the acrimony that has marked the last several years under Netanyahu and Trump will only intensify.

A mural depicting President Donald Trump kissing an Israeli army watchtower is seen on the separation barrier in the West Bank city of Bethlehem, August 4, 2017. (Flash90)

A mural depicting President Donald Trump kissing an Israeli army watchtower is seen on the separation barrier in the West Bank city of Bethlehem, August 4, 2017. (Flash90)

For decades, the two-state solution has been the central pillar of the bipartisan pro-Israel consensus in Washington. Since the signing of the Oslo Accords, every single U.S. administration has been committed, at least nominally, to the establishment of a Palestinian state alongside Israel.

Yet the expiration of the two-state paradigm under Prime Minister Netanyahu and the lack of a clear alternative to take its place has kicked that pillar away, disordering the politics of Israel-Palestine in the United States. Until American decision-makers adjust to the current one-state reality, the acrimony, chaos, and division that have marked the past several years will only intensify.

Without the pretext of a peace process, the Trump administration is pursuing a post-two-state agenda rife with draconian measures taken against key Palestinian institutions, from closing the PLO office in Washington to slashing funding to UNRWA. Today, the administration’s Middle East policy is being set by right-wing, pro-settlement officials, and Trump’s “Deal of the Century,” if it is ever released, is sure to be a gift to the Israeli territorial-maximalist right and will not likely include a Palestinian state. These shifts dovetail perfectly with Israel’s annexationist policies on the ground in the occupied territories.

U.S. politicians and the major Jewish-led organizations that deal with Israel-Palestine have so far failed to adjust in response. Almost all remain committed to a two-state solution, despite the clear intentions of both the Trump and Netanyahu administrations to bury it once and for all. And so, in the gap between their stated positions and the reality on the ground, confusion, hedging, and half-measures pervade.

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Liberal Zionist organizations like J Street and the New Israel Fund are attempting the difficult, ineffectual dance of outwardly opposing the BDS movement while simultaneously opposing measures that seek to outlaw boycotts of Israel. AIPAC stalwarts in Congress have attempted to bolster support for the two-state solution only to be rebuked by Israeli MKs, including several high-ranking members of Netanyahu’s Likud party, who called a Palestinian state “far more dangerous” than BDS.

The result has been the zombification of the bipartisan pro-Israel consensus — an undead consensus lumbering the halls of Congress that not only no longer corresponds to the political reality in Israel-Palestine, but also no longer reflects what many ordinary American voters actually believe. Indeed, while members of Congress can still be counted on to vote overwhelmingly in Israel’s favor across partisan lines, among the broader public, bipartisan support for Israel has collapsed.

A widely publicized 2018 Pew Survey found that only 27 percent of Democrats sympathize more with Israel than with the Palestinians, while 79 percent of Republicans sympathize more with Israel. Among young people, support for Israel is even lower. A 2018 Economist/YouGov poll found that just one-quarter of respondents ages 18-29 consider Israel an ally.

Members of Jewish-American anti-occupation group IfNotNow protest Trump's decision to move the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem, Washington D.C., May 14, 2018. (Gili Getz)

Members of Jewish-American anti-occupation group IfNotNow protest Trump’s decision to move the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem, Washington D.C., May 14, 2018. (Gili Getz)

Furthermore, recent polling suggests that on the actual issues of BDS and the one- and two-state solutions, U.S. politicians are even more out of step with the public than typically acknowledged. A 2018 University of Maryland poll found that there is no majority support for a two-state solution among Americans. The poll also reported that, “If the two-state solution ceased to be possible, 64 percent of Americans would choose the democracy of Israel, even if that meant that Israel would cease to be a politically Jewish state, over the Jewishness of Israel, if the latter meant Palestinians would not be fully equal.” And while few Americans have specifically heard of the BDS movement, 40 percent of Americans — and a majority of Democrats — support sanctions on Israel if it continues settlement expansion.

An ordinary country

When such a disjuncture exists between elected representatives and the people they represent, a realignment is in order — and realignments can often be messy, acrimonious affairs. The redrawing of a political terrain requires polarization, which is precisely what is happening right now between Democrats and Republicans, and among Democrats themselves.

We have already begun to see how a coalition of evangelical Christian Zionists and right-wing, Orthodox Jews has turned the GOP into the party of a single undemocratic Jewish state between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea. The Democrats, in contrast, and particularly the party leadership, have been exceptionally resistant to change, holding fast to the dying two-state paradigm.

Yet Democrats have significant room to realign their views with reality on the ground, and there is little to be gained from clinging to an obsolete position that has lost popular support. The sole supporters of BDS in Congress, Reps. Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib, have garnered attention not merely because Trump has targeted them, but because a sizable portion of Democrats sympathize with, if not share, their views.

Democratic Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib. (Stephanie Kenner/Shutterstock)

Democratic Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib. (Stephanie Kenner/Shutterstock)

Moving Democratic politicians into alignment with their base will likely require bitter primary challenges and internecine fights of the sorts that we have already seen. It is worth noting that many of the party’s leaders — Nancy Pelosi, Steny Hoyer, and others — are facing primary opponents whose platforms include much more left-wing positions on Israel-Palestine.

Realignments, of course, do not happen overnight. In the case of South Africa, three decades elapsed between the first major calls to boycott the apartheid regime and Congress’s passage of the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act of 1986 — over President Ronald Reagan’s veto.

In the case of Israel-Palestine, realignment could take just as long, if not longer. The Israeli government long ago adjusted its public relations strategy for the post-two-state reality, spending vast sums of money to oppose the BDS movement, despite its relative marginality, and combat what is often called “delegitimization” of Israel. Today, the Israeli hasbara apparatus’s most active front is the attempted redefinition of anti-Zionism as anti-Semitism, with the goal of rendering any opposition to the occupation, Zionism – or even simply Israeli policies themselves — beyond the pale of mainstream acceptability.

What this means is that the discord that has characterized the past several months of U.S. politics, from Israel’s denial of entry to Reps. Omar and Tlaib to Trump’s accusation of “disloyalty” against the vast majority of American Jews, will not only continue for the foreseeable future — it will probably get worse.

The one-staters in the Republican Party, in concert with the right-wing Israeli government, will continue to wield false accusations of anti-Semitism against critics of Israeli policy while strengthening alliances with actually anti-Semitic Christian Zionists in the United States and the far-right abroad. American Jews, threatened by rising white nationalist violence at home, will have to confront the painful reality that Israel, far from being a refuge or “light unto the nations,” is something much more ordinary — a violent, undemocratic state.

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    COMMENTS

    1. Bruce Gould

      I claim that every serious history of Israel shows that the proto-Israelis envisioned one state from the start, and this state would be as free of ‘Arabs’ as possible. But back to the present – this article appeared yesterday in the Atlantic: “Is Trump Destroying Bipartisan Consensus on Israel? Two weeks of outrage and head-spinning news show that institutional unification on Israel has gotten much weaker under President Trump.”

      https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2019/08/trump-israel/596731/

      For a long time, elected officials in Washington maintained a rough consensus on Israel. The United States and Israel were unquestioned allies. Military and aid packages were guaranteed winners in Congress. And support for Israel was bipartisan….As the past two weeks of head-spinning news about Israel have demonstrated, some aspects of Washington’s long-standing consensus on the country are changing.

      Reply to Comment
    2. Lewis from Afula

      Israelis decide Israel’s future.
      What a bunch of Hebrew-illiterate, intermarried, totally assimilated Christmass tree-decorating JINOS say is largely irrelevant.

      Reply to Comment
      • Bruce Gould

        @Lewis: Charles Freilich is a former Israeli deputy national security advisor. In 2017 he wrote an article in Newsweek titled “How Long Could Israel Survive Without America?”. Here it is – I don’t think it’s necessary to quote it, just read for yourself:

        https://www.newsweek.com/how-long-could-israel-survive-without-america-636298

        Reply to Comment
        • Lewis from Afula

          The US is terminally bankrupt. Its debts (federal, state, mortgage, credit card, education, corporate, financial) are bigger than anything in history. These debts will never be paid back. The upcoming recession, will be an order of magnitude worse than the 2008 event, mainly because interest rates are already near zero.

          The end game is either HYPERINFLATION or peoples’ BANK ACCOUNTS DISAPPEARING or a combination of both. No other outcome is mathematically possible.

          Hence, US aid to Israel is going to stop in the near future, irrespective of what the Xmass tree-decorating JINOS do or don’t do. Israel will have to live with 1% GDP less than now. Hopefully, the upcoming Leviathan natural gas sales will help make up the difference.

          Reply to Comment
          • Rivka Koen

            All the more reason to start denying aid, right? How selfish of you to ask a weak and dying country of debtors to give your country, the most superior and perfect country in the universe, blank check after blank check. I suggest you immediately bring this up with the highest levels of your government so they can stop exploiting poor America (by claiming to protect its evaporating Jewish community no less!) and can continue to call themselves a moral and Jewish democracy.

            Reply to Comment
          • Lewis from Afula

            Exactly. The US aid is going to stop soon irrespective of what the JINOS say or don’t say. The coming debt avalanche and Great World Depression is going to change everything everywhere.

            PS: That is not to say that US aid to Israel is a cause of the debt mountain. I read something like America has spent in total some $125 BILLION in aid to Israel. America’s total debt and unfunded liabilities is over $100 TRILLION. So Israel aid constitutes like a thousandth of the problem.

            Reply to Comment
          • Itshak Gordine

            Israel is the safest US ally in the region. $ 4 billion in US aid (spent on US equipment purchases..) is a win-win market for the US. So I do not think this help will stop. What some leftist pseudo-Jews think is absolutely irrelevant. Israel is indeed a democratic country like the USA

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            Israel and the territories it occupies is a unitary entity that is neither a country nor a democracy and is closer in principles and practices to apartheid-era South Africa than to the USA.

            Reply to Comment
          • Itshak Gordine

            What do you know? Have you visited Israel recently?

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            Yes.

            Reply to Comment
      • Rivka Koen

        JINO, that’s a funny word considering all forms of Zionism that have broad support in Israel are secular. Did you know that most of the people who you call JINOs are actually religious, and that the word JINO was made famous by a person who proudly identifies as a Judeo-Christian?

        Reply to Comment
      • Ben

        Americans decide America’s future.
        Israel’s offensive treatment of Congress is helping enormously in turning the tide, which was already turning, as Joshua Leifer makes clear.
        Are you competing with Halevy in the Missing the Point Olympics?

        Reply to Comment
        • itshak Gordine

          Our security is paramount and depends largely on us. For survival issues, no one can dictate what to do. If our allies are with us all the better, if not too bad.
          In summary, the opinion of some assimilated pseudo-Jews does not matter.

          Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            OK, swell, as explained by Chuck Freilich in the link provided by Bruce Gould, above, the USA only provides 40 percent of the IDF’s budget and only it’s entire procurement budget. Let’s just have the U.S. stop that and I’m sure you settlers will do just fine without that U.S. funding pipeline to Mama IDF–behind whose skirts you hide when you play biblical theme park cowboys and indians with the indigenous hostiles. Halevy from Switzerland loves playing cowboys and indians and he talks a big game about how he don’t need no American dollars in this here part of the holy land. Great, go to it, Halevy. You’re all hat no cattle.

            Reply to Comment
          • Itshak Gordine

            In 2018, the budget of the Israeli army was 18.5 billion including 3 billion US aid (devoted to the purchase of US weapons ..) It is a win-win operation for the US). In addition, Israel is the most powerful ally (the only one) of the USA in the region. So go down to earth, no clouds on the horizon. Do not forget that Israel is the 5th largest producer of weapons in the world. We produce almost everything except planes and submarines.
            It is incredible how some assimilated leftist pseudo-Jews live in dreams…

            Reply to Comment
      • Rivka Koen

        > intermarried

        You might want to look into the origins of King David; I hear he was matrilineally descended from a Moabite woman who never had a formal Orthodox conversion – and to whom marriage is expressly forbidden by the Torah. Scandalous, I know.

        Reply to Comment
        • itshak Gordine

          Rivka, you are full of hateful delusions. Ruth the Moabite, the ancestor of King David and the future messiah, converted well to Judaism. It is also the symbol of great converts to the Jewish people that we consider with respect. Nothing to do with those liberal Jews who only have a Jewish name. Liberal and conservative Judaism in the USA is an assimilation machine. The number of these Jews is only decreasing. That of the religious only increases.

          Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            @Itshak Gordine: Now the honest version of this:

            “In Israel the rabbinate has played an increasingly powerful role in transforming nationality into a quasi-racial definition, reserved only for a group that meets clear biological requirements (conversion processes are so difficult and humiliating that they are de facto a politics whose purpose is to dissuade non-Jews from joining the Jewish people, thus reinforcing the biological view that a Jew is someone born of a Jewish mother). It is not by chance that religious people in Israel are spearheading racist views. Rabbis on the public payroll call for not employing Arabs and for boycotting shops that do so; these rabbis also call on the population not to rent or sell apartments to Arabs. They frequently cite the Torah to justify the idea that that Jewish and non-Jewish lives are of unequal value. In fact, the view that Jews and non-Jews are both equally the children of God would be, for many religious Jews, sacrilege, a profanation of Judaism. The Lehava organization, that which battles against interfaith marriages and has set for itself the goal of maintaining the racial purity of Jews has been, as revealed in Haaretz in 2011, indirectly financed by the State of Israel.”
            https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium.MAGAZINE-rethinking-the-banality-of-evil-theory-1.5420900

            Reply to Comment
          • itshak Gordine

            You are the specialist of the mixture of everything and nothing, without, of course, knowing anything of the situation by living outside the country and reading only the Haaretz. Note: A conversion to Judaism is not humiliating for those who are sincere (members of my family have done ..). It takes about 3 years in diaspora and half the time in Israel. Mixed marriages are a sin in Judaism. In Israel dozens of Jewish women are sequestrated in Arab villages and are asking for help. An organization was later created to exfilter them and their children. Lehava opposes mixed marriages in accordance with the rules of Judaism. There is no question of racial purity (anyone can convert to Judaism) or biology. If you are Jewish, I sincerely believe that you suffer from self-hatred.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            You ought to know by now that I don’t hate myself.
            Is Eva Ilouz likewise self-hating, then, too?
            You are, of course, assiduously avoiding the racism in practice that Ilouz is talking about, which is the actual practices by the rabbinate, not your sanitized hasbara version of it.
            Haaretz is an Israeli newspaper written by Israelis for Israelis in Hebrew. And in English. These people know what is going on. You seem to be trying to convince us otherwise but what basis do you have for this? It is not some outsider publication. Why don’t you read it?

            Reply to Comment
          • itshak Gordine

            You are no longer in it. No one reads Haaretz in Israel except for some members of the self-proclaimed aging elites.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            As I have told you, whether Hebrew speaking Israelis read Haaretz devotedly or not misses the point, or perhaps if they don’t that is the point. Though you are the last person I would go to for any objective accounting of what Israelis do. I well understand that in your illegal settlement in the West Bank you and your neighbors do not have Haaretz delivered to your doorstep each morning. You have Arutz Sheva blasting on the TV. This is why Haaretz has an English language edition and why +972 was named +972 and from its inception was written in English as well as Hebrew. To go outside. You’re a lost cause. I have no illusions about redeeming you. Neither does +972 Magazine.

            Reply to Comment
          • itshak Gordine

            Neither we nor almost anyone in Israel has time to read Haaretz. Israeli TV channels allow everyone to express their opinions and are even often hostile to the government. This video of Fox news should interest you. Raheel Raza, President of the Council for Muslims facing tomorrow, says what she thinks of Omar and Tlaib:
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTJ6suDLoUU&t=187s
            In the meantime, more and more people are living on the land of our ancestors, whether you like it or not

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            I’m completely unsurprised that you get your news and your intellectual sustenance only from TV; and on TV, from places like Fox News and Arutz Sheva. And that you don’t “have time” to read Haaretz. It fits with how you come across in post after post. It does not reflect well on you.

            Because of how and where you consume news, I strongly suspect that you never heard, or read of, Congresswoman Ocasio-Cortez saying the following on a New York radio program, where she argued that the Netanyahu administration and the Trump administration are similar in attempting to silence criticism of Israel:

            “The Right wants to advance this notion that if you engage and critique an Israeli policy you are anti-Semitic. But it’s the furthest thing from the truth. Criticizing the occupation doesn’t make you anti-Israel, frankly. It doesn’t mean that you are against the existence of a nation. It means that you believe in human rights, and it’s about making sure that Palestinian human rights are equal to Israeli human rights, and there are a lot of troubling things happening there. Jewish people have been persecuted throughout all of human history, but I don’t think that by marginalizing Palestinians, you create safety. I believe that injustice is a threat to the safety of all people, because once you have a group that is marginalized and marginalized and marginalized — once someone doesn’t have access to clean water, they have no choice but to riot, right? And it doesn’t have to be that way.”

            Why is it that any Muslim who opposes the occupation is a “hater” but any Muslim you can find who supports the “Ocasio-Cortez is an anti-Semite, case closed” line is this wonderful beacon of light you press upon us?

            Notable is this video you press on us is Alan Dershowitz pushing the standard line about “terrorism,” and praising non-extremist Islam (I praise it too, every bit as much as Dershowitz) but never admitting that what Israel does in the territories is terror. And terror in support of an ethnic cleansing agenda.

            Israel’s Ethnic Cleansing Continues
            https://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-israel-s-ethnic-cleansing-continues-1.7771874

            (And you can easily locate Ilana Hammerman’s essay, “Israel is the Terrorist.”

            When you say, “In the meantime, more and more people are living on the land of our ancestors, whether you like it or not,” what you are saying is that the only “people” who count as people are Jewish people, and the rest be damned. That’s a form of hate speech. But as I said, I have no illusions about you.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            And on the subject of Congresswomen Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib, as well as Hanan Ashrawi, think Peter Beinart is correct, and I think Beinart does a wonderful job of dissecting and refuting the standard distractions Rich Lowry tries to throw at him:

            Peter Beinart vs. Rich Lowry on Miftah: “Palestinians Don’t Have To Be Saints In Order To Have Basic Human Rights”
            https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2019/08/19/peter_beinart_vs_rich_lowry_on_miftah_palestinians_dont_have_to_be_saints_in_order_to_have_basic_rights.html

            Reply to Comment
        • Lewis from Afula

          In a recent Pew study, out of every 100 Non-orthodox American Jews, only 16 have kids where both parents are Jewish. The rest are intermarried, not married or married without kids. Of the ones who are intermarried and are raising Jewish kids, nearly all those Jewish kids themselves go on to intermarry and leave Judaism.
          The whole thing is falling apart.

          There are only 2 ways stay long term Jewish in the modern World.
          1. Live in an orthodox lifestyle – at least keeping Shabat and eating strictly Kosher.
          2. Live in Israel.

          Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            So, in other words, to stay Jewish you have to be an aggressively racist denier of human rights to non-Jews, maintaining a primitive, atavistic tribalism in a constant war-like state. One of the unconscious reasons Israelis treasure the occupation and the eternal sense of cowboys and indians victimhood/valor/victory they get from it (the cowboys are winning, hooray! but the dastardly indians killed some of our noble cowboys! grrrrr!) is because it is exciting and distracts from the real problems of 21st century modernity, and keeps the Jewish population united against a common designated enemy so that they keep themselves from going at each other.

            Reply to Comment
          • Lewis from Afula

            Fresh leftist nonsense from Comrade Ben.
            I suspect Ben does not live a strictly Orthodox lifestyle while he lives outside Israel.
            I have probably triggered the guy !!

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            One thing is for certain–I am not a transplanted American playing Biblical Disneyland Theme Park cowboys and indians while hiding behind Mama IDF’s skirts and letting her wallop the indians whenever they get too rebellious.

            Reply to Comment
          • Lewis from Afula

            The only Biblical Disneyland around here is the one synthesized in Ben’s SJW-warped mind.

            I suspect Comrade Ben believes Israelis are not “real people”. We don’t go to work, we don’t have a personal life, we don’t have friends and we don’t experience problems that are totally unconnected to politics. In Ben’s imagination, we all inhabit some surreal World living as “extras” in some 1960s-style Exodus film.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            And lo, look over at Meron Rapoport’s article (“The Israeli right stopped talking about occupation, and that will hurt it at the polls”)–where Meron essentially takes my argument a step further, saying that Netanyahu and the Israeli right have actually accomplished the trick of making the occupation and the sense of thrill and danger it carries disappear from Israelis’ lexicon and political consciousness.

            And what do you know? ….Yep, Israelis are now going at each other over real 21st century problems of modernity. So I think that what is happening in this election bears out empirically what I just said to you, only Meron puts the same truth in a new light.

            Reply to Comment
          • Lewis from Afula

            Judea and Samaria were LIBERATED in the 6 day war.
            The JORDAMIAN squatters are free and return to their own country (which is literally just down the road).
            Meron is a Moron which is why he contributes to 972 mag.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            Odd “liberation,” that, where you need a constant menacing heavy troop occupation to keep everybody “liberated.”

            Reply to Comment
          • Lewis from Afula

            As opposed to pre-1967, when heavy troop concentrations were required to defend us on the Green line and stop the Arab invasion.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            Yeah now you have secret submarine defense installations embedded in those swimming pools in West Bank settler backyards. Whew! The dastardly destruction of Israel prevented just in the nick of time again! The Israeli army, always on the cutting edge of the arms for dictators industry. And the real estate industry!

            Reply to Comment
          • Lewis from Afula

            There were NO SETTLEMENTS before 1967, yet there was still terrorism then wasn’t there ?
            More recently, in 2005, Israel withdrew from Gaza. To this end, we dismantled ALL OUR SETTLEMENTS, removed bodies from the cemeteries and removed ALL IDF forces. A fat lot of use that turned out that be didn’t it?

            The Arabs want to destroy the entire country. Giving them bits of it is not going to stop their jihadi destructive impulse. You are an expert in peddling historical revsionism and fake concepts that have no basis in reality. Either that or your mentally insane.

            Reply to Comment
          • Dave

            Just give back the land the Zionists stole from the Palestinians and peace will follow.

            Reply to Comment
    3. Ron

      Re “no majority support for a two-state solution among Americans” – the results of the 2018 U. of Maryland poll cited here seem strange. E.g.: 33% of Republicans (and 38% of Independents) support a one-state future with equal rights for all? This doesn’t seem consistent with Republican opinion generally. I’m guessing that some respondents didn’t fully understand the choices here. Supposed support for one equal state is also seems inconsistent with the results of other questions, e.g., 57% of Republicans lean toward Israel, only 3% toward Palestinians. (Among Independents, its’ 18% vs. 3%). Full data at https://sadat.umd.edu/sites/sadat.umd.edu/files/UMCIP%20Questionnaire%20Sep%20to%20Oct%202018.pdf

      Reply to Comment
    4. Barry Rosen

      82 years of Palestinian Rejectionism.
      1937 Peel Commission: No
      1948: No
      1978: No
      1991: Probably not.
      1995: We’ll agree to wait to say no later
      2000: No, Intifada
      2001: No
      2008: We’re not even gonna answer
      2014: No, we would rather continue with Pay for Slay
      2019: No Again

      Reply to Comment
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