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Major Israeli construction company pulls out of settlement industry

Israeli daily Yedioth Ahronoth reported Monday morning that Africa Israel Investments, an international holding and investment company based in Israel, will no longer build homes in the West Bank or East Jerusalem. This, after years that Africa Israel’s daughter company, Danya Cebus, has consistently built homes in settlements, contrary to international law.

There is no mistaking this decision. Lev Leviev, one of the most prominent tycoons in Israel, did not wake up one morning and understand, by chance, that the occupation is a terrible injustice toward millions of subjects who lack basic rights and who have been under our military rule for nearly 50 years. No. It took years. Years in which Leviev discovered that he could not continue building in the settlements while enjoying legitimacy in the international business world.

Settlement of Halamish, next to Nabi Saleh (Activestills)

Settlement of Halamish, next to Nabi Saleh (Activestills)

The opposition took the form of protests, pressure on the British government to cut business ties with Leviev, and divestment from his company. Between the profit he could make off the occupation and the profit he could lose in the rest of the world, Leviev chose the world.

This is another huge victory for the boycott movement and the activists who choose to fight against the occupation nonviolently. This is a victory for those who want to tell Israelis that even if the occupation is currently profitable, things can easily change. Africa Israel’s decision won’t stop the settlement enterprise, and its impact will likely be marginal. However, the message continues to permeate.

Related:
Figures show: Peace talks and settlement construction go hand in hand
What ‘painful concessions’ are left for Palestinians to make?

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    COMMENTS

    1. Danny

      Waiting for K8 to tell us that everything is hunky dory with Israel’s occupation, and that this is nothing more than a bump in the road.

      Love it when hasbara effortlessly falls apart when faced with reality!

      Reply to Comment
      • Ginger Eis

        The article also says:
        (…). “This, despite the fact that Africa Israel’s daughter company, Danya Cebus, consistently builds homes in settlements,….”.

        Danny the Jihadi, what part of that is difficult to get through your thick Jihadi skull?

        Reply to Comment
        • The word “despite” is not used in the first paragraph at all. By inserting it into your falsely quoted sentence, you attempt to negate the sentence’s meaning. I read the first paragraph as saying 1) Africa Israel has a subsidiary, Danya Cebus, which has built settlement homes for several years but now 2) Africa Israel is disengaging from all such activity, so including Danya Cebus. If this is not the meaning I suppose the pieces author can clarify.

          Either you misinterpreted the sentence, making up what you thought it said, or you wanted to think it said something else, so, again, made it up not so realizing. I’d like to think you didn’t make the error intentionally.

          Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            @ Mr. Haggai Matar

            The quote above I cut, copied and pasted from your ORIGINAL article. I see that the article has been edited AFTER my post. I request you to acknowledge the editing – in the interest of fairness.

            Below is that part of your ORIGINAL article:

            “This, despite the fact that Africa Israel’s daughter company, Danya Cebus, consistently builds homes in settlements, contrary to international law.”

            Reply to Comment
          • I believe you, GE. The original quote has an ambiguity over tense. You took it to mean presently active, that is, in contrast to Africa Israel proper. But it could as well refer, and I would have taken it so, to the past use of a daughter company in construction. Certainly it makes little sense for a parent company to announce withdrawal while a subsidiary continues; why would then, i.e., Times of Israel, give the matter headline status?

            You read in your hope, I read in mine. As to demanding 972 do something; well, our past words color our present demands.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            You Mr, Greg Pollock wrote this:

            “The word “despite” is not used in the first paragraph at all”.

            This is blatantly false. You have no idea of what the ORIGINAL first paragraph was! So, pls. STAY OUT OF THIS.

            If Mr. Haggai Matar is (a) an honest person and (b) has any form of journalistic integrity, he should acknowledge that he edited/revised his article AFTER my post. I have no need whatsoever of you believing me and really not interested in the rest of your mumbo jumbo garbage. This is between me and Mr. Haggai Matar. Just stay the hell out of it, ok?!

            Reply to Comment
          • ***This is between me and Mr. Haggai Matar. Just stay the hell out of it, ok?!***

            Why should we, Gingernut?(!!!?!??)

            The author made a clarifying edit, no more, no less. Watching you squirm about ‘journalistic integrity’ is truly priceless…

            Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            And all I ask for is an ACKNOWLEDGEMENT of the “clarifying edit” as you put it. Nothing more; nothing less. Fairness, honesty and journalistic integrity demand that, because based on that “clarifying edit” false accusations are being made! (by Greg Pollock). But if Mr. Haggai Matar chooses not to acknowledge anything, so be it. This is really about him; about who he is as a person and a professional. Again, stay out of it and let Mr. Haggai speak for himself.

            Reply to Comment
          • Yvette

            You’re nuts. It’s scary.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            Indeed, an proven imbecile like Yvette will never learn to stay out of stuff that regards them not.

            Reply to Comment
          • No, GE, false accusations are not being made. By the time I encountered this piece, “dispute” was gone. I found out about it from you. I basically acknowledged that, and said I could understand your interpretation. Instead, I am attacked.

            Good luck in the weeping area.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            Greg Pollock, when a person presents a quotation, said person is not giving his/her opinion, but rather offering a fact. I was not stating my opinion when I quoted Haggai Matar, but rather presenting a fact. Any average person would understand you to mean that I (a) manipulated Haggai Matar’s statement and (b) presented the manipulation as a fact in quotation marks. Do you have any idea what that means (I am certain you are aware of the clear academic rules on quotation marks)? The fact that you don’t understand why I was furious tells me that you still don’t get it. Thanks anyways for the acknowledging that you were unaware of the original sentence Haggai Matar used in his original article, which is: “This, despite the fact that Africa Israel’s daughter company, Danya Cebus, consistently builds homes in settlements, contrary to international law.” (you can see that not only the word “despite” is missing after the editing, but that the tense of the whole sentence was changed thereby giving the sentence a whole new different meaning).

            Reply to Comment
        • BDS was started in 2005. And from the BDS website:
          1)Kuwait to boycott 50 companies over role in illegal Israeli settlements October 27, 2014 by Palestinian BDS National Committee The blacklisted companies include some of the top corporate targets of the BDS movement, such as Veolia, Volvo, Heidelberg Cement, Dexia, Pizzarotti and Alstom – See more at: http://www.bdsmovement.net
          2)More than 500 anthropologists back academic boycott of Israel October 25, 2014 by Sarah Irving at Electronic Intifada “The recent military assault on the Gaza Strip by Israel is only the latest reminder that the world’s governments and mainstream media do not hold Israel accountable for its violations of international law,” the statement notes – See more at: http://www.bdsmovement.net/
          3)Los Angeles activists block unloading of Israeli cargo ship for two days October 19, 2014 by Charlotte Silver at Electronic Intifada The Block the Boat coalition of Los Angeles claimed another victory, delaying an Israeli cargo ship for more than 34 hours – See more at: http://www.bdsmovement.net
          4)Nobel laureates and 60,000 others call for military embargo on Israel October 12, 2014 by Palestinian BDS National Committee Signatories Include Desmond Tutu, Roger Waters, Alice Walker, Michael Ondaatje, Brian Eno, Mira Nair and Mike Leigh Palestinian Civil Society Salutes California Dockworkers and Endorses their “Block-the-Boat” BDS Action October 11, 2014 by Palestinian BDS National Committee The BNC warmly salutes the Oakland, California dockworkers and community activists for their inspiring new victory against the Israeli container ship Zim on 27 September 2014
          5) SodaStream: is BDS hitting where it hurts? October 11, 2014 by Doug Henwood for Mondoweiss SodaStream’s stock is now 70% off its all-time high set in July 2011 – See more at: http://www.bdsmovement.net
          6)G4S loses out on Irish government contract October 10, 2014 by Irish Palestine Solidarity Campaign Palestine activists campaigned against G4S being awarded the contract over its role in Israeli prisons and checkpoints – See more at: http://www.bdsmovement.net

          Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            (a) Israeli economy continues to grow year by year, while the fundamentals of said economy are strong and ironclad!
            (b) The Jewish population in Judea and Samaria grows at a breathtaking pace on a daily basis.
            (c) Jewish homes and Communities in Judea and Samaria are expanding at a breathtaking pace -on a daily basis.
            (d) Jewish companies thrive in Judea and Samaria, etc.

            Question: who is winning? what exactly is your victory? Are you really that dense that you can’t even do basic math such as counting from 1-10 with your fingers – at your age? Gee, what an imbecile!

            Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            Here is your prince of hate – norman g. finkelstein – telling you (a) that you are a liar and (b) that you won’t win. norman g. finkelstein is telling you: ‘little marnie, “step out of your ghetto”! He says that you are full of “nonsense” and a whole lot more.

            Watch. And weep!

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ol8xhTySKfM

            Reply to Comment
      • Kolumn8

        Africa Israel made a business decision. It decided it can make more money abroad and thinks this will help. Someone else will build in the settlements for the simple reason that there is money to be made there. The settlers have their own construction companies.

        The basic truth is that Israeli control of the West Bank has never been about economics. It has always been a combination of ideological and security considerations. Only the dumbest communists have sought to analyze this conflict on the basis of economics.

        The other basic truth is that this isn’t going to change the view of the bds crowd on Africa Israel because they boycott anything Israeli. In other words this is unlikely to be a business decision that will have any positive impact on the bottom line of the company and it will have been demonstrated to be a stupid business decision.

        Reply to Comment
    2. Ginger Eis

      “This is another huge victory for the boycott movement and the activists who choose to fight against the occupation nonviolently. This is a victory for those who want to tell Israelis that even if the occupation is currently profitable, things can easily change”.

      Yes! Yes! Yeeeeesss! Wooohoooo! The ground under the “settlements” is shaking and quaking violently; the “Settlements” are turning into rubbles! Get the party started … start the fireworks ….. eh ….. no no no, wait! Just wait a goddamn minute!:

      “Africa Israel’s decision won’t stop the settlement enterprise, and its impact will likely be marginal.”

      …eh… wtf?!

      Reply to Comment
      • “Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain: for the LORD will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.”

        There isn’t any codicil to this commandment re: zionists.

        Proverbs 10:31 “The mouth of the just bringeth forth wisdom: but the froward tongue shall be cut out.”

        Reply to Comment
        • Joel

          *cue cuckoo clock chime*

          Reply to Comment
    3. Africa Israel’s decision won’t stop the settlement enterprise, and its impact will likely be marginal. However, the message continues to permeate.

      Hallelujah! “From small beginnings come great things”. Thank you BDS!

      Reply to Comment
      • Ginger Eis

        Celebrating the storm in a tea-cup! Desperate, no? Indeed, one of the best thing that could ever happen to Israel is that the enemies of Zion have no clue as to when they are being outsmarted – as you demonstrate. AfricaIsrael is thus out of Judea & Samaria, but STILL in Judea & Samaria (through its daughter company) and you are in rapture?! Gee! You are not extremely clever, are ya?

        Reply to Comment
    4. Khaled Cheema

      Total boycott of all Israel is the only thing that will free the Palestinians from the Zionist tyranny.

      Any Israel loving Zionist living abroad should know they will pay a price for supporting Israeli racism and brutality. The only language a Zionist understands is to kick them where it hurts: In his bank account.

      Reply to Comment
      • Ginger Eis

        You, obviously, have no idea that BDS started waaay back in 1948 following the war of Independence? Why am I not surprised. Anyway, look at Israel today: (a) Israel is the 100th smallest country in the world and can fit into Europe 459 times, but Israel has the third highest number of companies listed on the NASDAQ after America and China! (b) Israel has also the highest number of high-tech start ups, estimated to be 3,500, ranging from internet companies to software solutions, outside of the US!! (c) Israel has a GDP higher than the COMBINED GDP of Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, (d) Israel is number one in engineers per capita on the entire planet- in terms of talent in programming, in product, in marketing it is second only to Silicon Valley; (e) Israel is the only country on earth with the highest concentration of PhD holders and Nobel Laureates per capita! Et cetera, et cetera – just mentioning a few things so that you get a clue. And the Arabs: well, the Muslim-Arabs are by and large still a brutish, primitive people in darkness! Currently the Muslim-Arabs are too busy swimming in their own blood and committing genocide against Christians and other ethnic minorities. As we defeated your forefathers and your fathers before you on the battlefields, so we will defeat you on the BDS-front. It ain’t rocket science and have been winning the BDS-war since 1948 – as facts on the ground demonstrate. Meanwhile fume and suffocate in your hate and jealousy!

        Reply to Comment
        • Bryan

          Surely, Ginger, BDS began began long before 1948 with the Zionist policy of Hebrew Labour, boycotting Arab shopkeepers and Arab workers, because the only way that the effete colonists could achieve the European lifestyle they yearned for was to boycott Palestinian workers who were prepared to work harder and longer than the immigrant elite.

          Yes Israelis are the cleverest, brightest, best-educated population in the world (shame the same does not apply to your politicians, generals and electorate – perhaps because religious bigotry undermines exceptional IQ) but don’t denigrate the entrepreneurial and professional capability of your Palestinian cousins who given fair opportunities, access to education and foreign investment, would be worthy rivals. There is of course a reason for this, since when many of the original people of Israel scarpered off to the flesh-pots of Europe, a Jewish population remained, converted to Christianity and then Islam and became the Palestinian people. Thus, though showing a greater love of the land than the supposed “exiles” they have greater claims to be favoured by God and equal claims to cleverness (if God did indeed indeed inject a higher IQ in the original population of the land?)

          Reply to Comment
    5. Richard

      Delusions of grandeur here – an illustration of the BDS cult complex Finkelstein described not too long ago. The corporate world that Leviev operates in doesn’t give a shit about BDS, which doesn’t share the same goals as the UK Government when it comes to Israel. High-level politicking, the exact opposite of BDS strategy, is responsible for this. This shows, more than anything, that BDS is precisely the WRONG strategy.

      Reply to Comment
    6. ***The corporate world that Leviev operates in doesn’t give a shit about BDS, which doesn’t share the same goals as the UK Government when it comes to Israel.***

      Just like during the early stages of the boycott of SA many G’ments don’t share the same goal… YET.

      But that will change, in part due to people like Richard who will continue to cheer on the Zionist colonial project so that it feels confident it can carry on.

      Until of course much of the world will demand action, then you’ll see these G’ments flip easily enough, just like with respect to SA.

      You just don’t understand the process.

      Reply to Comment
      • Richard

        You’re completely unread and ignorant, since you obviously have no idea how Apartheid really ended. Boycotts were not the reason.

        Reply to Comment
        • Great, glad you settled the whole boycott, divestment and sanctions question with that. We’ll just have to give up. Really Richard, your denial doesn’t mean dick.

          Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            A Mandela- era legislator, marnie, says(a) that you misappropriate “apartheid” (b) that you are misleading and (c) that you are a liar! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v27sNLIEOes

            Reply to Comment
          • Richard

            Marnie – you are another ignorant person who talks without knowing how Apartheid really ended. My denials don’t have to mean anything because the history speaks for itself. That BDS-style boycotts ended Apartheid is a myth. Read a book.

            Reply to Comment
        • Eliza

          Richard – You seem sure that boycotts did not end SA Apartheid.

          But boycotts are a complex thing in their effects. I doubt that Africa Israel, and its subsidiary company, Danya Cebus will have an immediate measurable effect on W/B settlements or Israeli policy.

          But it appears without doubt that AI has made this business decision because of the adverse effects on its profitability in other ventures and its respectability. When major shareholding organisations, like pension funds start divesting, companies do respond. And the divestment comes about, not because of any moral stance of the fund, but because of pressure from the public. A good name, being a good corporate citizen is an asset to a company which most cannot afford to ignore.
          When funds dry up, companies basically wither away – they are susceptible to prolonged public pressure.

          But, in relation to the boycott movement and SA Apartheid – one comment that was made by the members of the ANC was that one of the important effects of the boycott movement was the sense of solidarity to gave to them. In other words, it gave those fighting Apartheid a sense that they were not alone in their struggle.

          Its never just economics. If BDS successes give the Palestinians a sense that their cause is supported, this can only strengthen their morale and resolve. These intangible effects are just as important as an immediate change to the bottom line or an immediate change in Israeli policy.

          Guess we will all just have to wait and see how effective BDS is.

          Reply to Comment
      • Ginger Eis

        Only a moron would believe that the Arab-Israeli conflict is anything remotely like Apartheid SA. Continue to wallow in your delusions until your hour of rude awakening. BDS started in 1948. Look were we are today, while “much of the world” still rushes to Israel for the latest in innovation and high tech, etc. But I understand that you need to believe in some form of an imaginary miraculous powers of The Great BDS to make yourself feel good. Well, knock yourself out with that!

        Reply to Comment
        • Bryan

          If BDS is such a pointless ineffectual venture one wonders why Zionist supporters are injecting so much effort and money and passion into counteracting it.

          Reply to Comment
    7. You can gauge the effectiveness of something by watching those against it become completely unglued and do everything they can (especially believing their denial is magical) to minimize its success. If you think the BDS movement is not effective, STFU. Or why don’t you:
      a) Invest all your money in SodaStream – set them old bubbles free!
      b) Contact Leviev and invest in the occupation with more than your excessive verbiage and toxicity.
      c) Keep screaming like a banshee until something ruptures.

      Reply to Comment
    8. Bruce Gould

      People who think that ‘apartheid’ is an inappropriate word for describing Israel will be interested in Susan Nathans “The Other Side Of Israel” – she lived in a Palestinian town inside Israel and describes her experiences.

      Reply to Comment
      • Ginger Eis

        “Mandela- era legislator: Arabs misappropriate “apartheid” to slander Israel- MP Kenneth Meshoe”

        This man actually is a South African. This man actually lived in South Africa!

        Watch. And Weep!

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v27sNLIEOes

        Reply to Comment
    9. Brian

      EIS:

      YOUR INTERPRETATION OF

      “Israeli daily Yedioth Ahronoth reported Monday morning that Africa Israel Investments, an international holding and investment company based in Israel, will no longer build homes in the West Bank or East Jerusalem. This, after years that Africa Israel’s daughter company, Danya Cebus, has consistently built homes in settlements, contrary to international law.”

      IS

      “Celebrating the storm in a tea-cup! Desperate, no? Indeed, one of the best thing that could ever happen to Israel is that the enemies of Zion have no clue as to when they are being outsmarted – as you demonstrate. AfricaIsrael is thus out of Judea & Samaria, but STILL in Judea & Samaria (through its daughter company) and you are in rapture?! Gee! You are not extremely clever, are ya?”
      —–

      I have to tell you: if your reading comprehension in English is truly this bad you would fail the US high school SAT exam outright. Actually you would probably fail the US pre-high-school standardized exams. Outright.

      Reply to Comment
    10. http://www.bdsmovement.net

      The BDS movement started in 2005 and has gained serious momentum thanks to the actions of the GOI and IDF after the latest bloodbath. For example –
      – Israel excluded from Italy military exercises after protest
      – Kuwait to boycott 50 companies over role in illegal Israeli settlements
      – Dexia, Pizzarotti and Alstom More than 500 anthropologists back academic boycott of Israel
      – Nobel laureates and 60,000 others call for military embargo on Israel
      – on 27 September 2014 SodaStream: is BDS hitting where it hurts? October 11, 2014 by Doug Henwood for Mondoweiss SodaStream’s stock is now 70% off its all-time high set in July 2011

      There’s so much more to be found at http://www.bdsmovement.net
      Read! And Cheer!

      Reply to Comment
    11. The third time should be a charm?

      http://www.bdsmovement.net
      Started in 2005
      Lots of progress being made and just getting stronger thanks to the determination of the Palestinian people and their millions of supporters. Definitely good works in progress.

      Reply to Comment
      • Ginger Eis

        No one could have described you and your ilk better than you just did. Priceless! You see manic marnie, this obsession with Jews is eating you away from inside and will ultimately destroy your spirit. It doth seem, marnie, that you are getting even more manic as the days go by and I am almost sure that you will hang yourself soon. Have you bought the ropes yet – as I advised you earlier?

        Reply to Comment
        • I’m not a psychiatrist but unfortunately have come in contact with many mentally ill people in israel. You have a very unhealthy obsession with Jewish people and israel. Your faux concern and outrage concerning christians in syria and the plight of the Yazidis is a mockery of what it means to be human and an attempt to turn the attention away from the atrocities committed in the name of zionism. I’d feel sorry for you, but you are doing such a good job of that on your own. You can keep gnawing on that bone all you want, it seems to be very satisfying for you, but I have to take a long shower to wash away the filth I’ve been exposed to, it really is quite toxic.

          GO BDS!

          Reply to Comment
          • Brian

            Responses Israel’s President Rivlin has received for his efforts against racism:

            http://www.haaretz.com/mobile/.premium-1.623228

            Raising the issue before the full Knesset, Rivlin spells out, and enters into the Knesset’s official record, responses he had received:

            “‘You lying Jew,’ my critics have hurled. ‘Damn your name, you agent of the Arabs,’ ‘Go be president in Gaza,’ ‘Disgusting suck-up [to the Arabs],’ ‘Rotten filth,’ ‘Lowest of the low,’ ‘Traitor,’ ‘President of Hezbollah.’ And this is just some, (sadly, far from the most disturbing), of the vitriol thrown at me following statements I have made or events I have attended.”
            ——————

            They sound just like Eis. Who doubts one of them invited the President to hang himself and asked if he’d bought the rope to do it?

            Reply to Comment
          • I hope that President Rivlin meant what he said and I hope he doesn’t back down. You know he’s on the right track when he’s getting all that mess thrown at him. If the loonies go “postal” it’s only because they’ve heard the truth and it makes them absolutely mad. I won’t name names – seems to get them off and that is kinda gross.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            I thought you were going to use ropes to do it. Now, you are going to take a bath? Hmmmmm, just make sure the bathtub is deep enough and filled with water, otherwise it is going to be a difficult drowning, manic marnie…… just saying……

            “GO BDS”? You are already melting down here on the comment section; how then will you survive on the BDS front if and when Israel decides to take you on (something she will not do, because you and your ilk are just noise making empty drums!)?

            Reply to Comment
          • Brian

            Evidently you think publicly inviting someone to hang/drown themselves and suggesting techniques to do it is “a proper Zionist response.” This fits with what seems to be your concept of Jewishness and Israeliness: a kind of mafia ruled by a code of omertà.

            Reply to Comment
    12. Mikesailor

      Funny how writing about justice leads to the last refuge of scoundrel hasbaristas: that somehow you have become obsessed with Jews. Frankly, I could care less for Jews as opposed to others. I am concerned with justice and not having the US pay for Israel Jews’ whimsical oppression of the Palestinians.

      Reply to Comment
      • Ginger Eis

        (a) If the Israeli Left under Ehud Barak could not make peace with the Palestinians, a balanced person would have started asking him-/herself hard questions and looking elsewhere for the reason for lack of peace.
        (b) If the Israeli (far) Left under Ehud Olmert tried again, but could yet again not make peace with the Palestinians – even after offering (1) 100% of Gaza (2) 100% equivalent of Judea and Samaria (3) Arab neighborhoods in East Jerusalem and (4) relinquishing Jewish sovereignty over the Holiest Places in Judaism – a balanced person would have started asking him-/herself hard questions and looking elsewhere for the reason for lack of peace.
        (c) The fact that you, despite all of the above, still focus exclusively on- and blame Israel for all ills is at the minimum perplexing, no? The fact that the Arab-Israeli conflict is the only conflict that really keeps you busy and awake at night, doth at the minimum raise questions, no? You yada about about “oppression”? Looking for a fig-leaf? What oppression?!

        Reply to Comment
        • Ginger Eis

          (d) “Palestinian” olive trees are more important to you than The Genocide you care not about

          The fact that genocide is being carried out against your fellow Christians and other ethnic minorities in Iraq, whereby your fellow Christian men and boys are beheaded en mass while your fellow Christian women, teenage girls and little girls are raped and taken as concubines for sexual pleasure, while you and your ilk are obsessed with Jews and more concerned about “Palestinian” olive trees, is rather jaw rapping, no? indeed, the only sin the Syrians, the Christians of Iraq and the Yazidis have committed is stupidity: they are toooo stupid in not being able to link the atrocities against them to Jews, because if they had done that, they would have been saved! I do not expect you to admit that you are obsessed with Jews, because nobody ever admits to such a thing. Even the Nazis denied being anti-Semites during the Nürmberg trials!

          Reply to Comment
          • Brian

            That’s an interesting technique: accuse someone falsely of something no one ever admits to and then when they don’t admit it say hah! I knew it! Gotcha!
            Bizarre.

            Reply to Comment
          • I feel like I’m in an alternate universe. The lunatics are running the asylum.

            “There’s someone in my head but it’s not me.
            And if the cloud bursts, thunder in your ear
            You shout and no one seems to hear
            And if the band you’re in starts playing different tunes
            I’ll see you on the dark side of the moon

            Reply to Comment
    13. Op-Ed
      Does the term ‘apartheid’ fit Israel? Of course it does.

      The storm of controversy after Secretary of State John F. Kerry’s warning that Israel risked becoming an “apartheid state” reminded us once again that facts, data and the apparently tedious details of international law often seem to have little bearing on conversations about Israel conducted at the highest levels of this country. As was the case when other major figures brandished the “A-word” in connection with Israel (Jimmy Carter comes to mind), the political reaction to Kerry’s warning was instantaneous and emotional. “Israel is the only democracy in the Middle East, and any linkage between Israel and apartheid is nonsensical and ridiculous,” said California Sen. Barbara Boxer. That’s that, then, eh?.

      Op-Ed
      Related article: Israel isn’t, and will never be, an apartheid stateby
      Michael Oren

      Not quite. Flat and ungrounded assertions may satisfy politicians, but anyone who wants to push the envelope of curiosity even a little bit further might want to spend a few minutes actually thinking over the term and its applicability to Israel.

      “Apartheid” isn’t just a term of insult; it’s a word with a very specific legal meaning, as defined by the International Convention on the Suppression and Punishment of the Crime of Apartheid, adopted by the U.N. General Assembly in 1973 and ratified by most United Nations member states (Israel and the United States are exceptions, to their shame).

      l Related Op-EdApartheid in Israel? Hardly.See all relatedí

      8

      ADVERTISEMENT
      According to Article II of that convention, the term applies to acts “committed for the purpose of establishing and maintaining domination by one racial group of persons over any other racial group of persons and systematically oppressing them.” Denying those others the right to life and liberty, subjecting them to arbitrary arrest, expropriating their property, depriving them of the right to leave and return to their country or the right to freedom of movement and of residence, creating separate reserves and ghettos for the members of different racial groups, preventing mixed marriages — these are all examples of the crime of apartheid specifically mentioned in the convention.

      Seeing the reference to racial groups here, some people might think of race in a putatively biological sense or as a matter of skin color. That is a rather simplistic (and dated) way of thinking about racial identity. More to the point, however, the operative definition of “racial identity” is provided in the 1965 International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (to which Israel is a signatory), on which the apartheid convention explicitly draws.

      “And so it goes in all domains of life, from birth to death: a systematic, vigilantly policed separation of the two populations.”-
      t▼
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      There, the term “racial discrimination” is defined as “any distinction, exclusion, restriction or preference based on race, color, descent, or national or ethnic origin which has the purpose or effect of nullifying or impairing the recognition, enjoyment or exercise, on an equal footing, of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the political, economic, social, cultural or any other field of public life.”

      A few basic facts are now in order.

      c Comments

      What a fool this guy is. Did Blacks have political parties in South Africa? Could they hold parliament seats? Could they be judges? Could they be SUPREME COURT judges (there is an Arab-Israeli justice)? Could they be officers in the Army? Generals in the army? Israel is the only country which…

      shlomi.helfgot

      at 8:21 AM July 18, 2014

      Add a commentíSee all commentsí

      92

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      The Jewish state (for so it identifies itself, after all) maintains a system of formal and informal housing segregation both in Israel and in the occupied territories. It’s obvious, of course, that Jewish settlements in the West Bank aren’t exactly bursting with Palestinians. In Israel itself, however, hundreds of communities have been established for Jewish residents on land expropriated from Palestinians, in which segregation is maintained, for example, by admissions committees empowered to use ethnic criteria long since banned in the United States, or by the inability of Palestinian citizens to access land held exclusively for the Jewish people by the state-sanctioned Jewish National Fund.

      Jewish residents of the occupied territories enjoy various rights and privileges denied to their Palestinian neighbors. While the former enjoy the protections of Israeli civil law, the latter are subject to the harsh provisions of military law. So, while their Jewish neighbors come and go freely, West Bank Palestinians are subject to arbitrary arrest and detention, and to the denial of freedom of movement; they are frequently barred from access to educational or healthcare facilities, Christian and Muslim sites for religious worship, and so on.

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      Meanwhile, Palestinian citizens of Israel must contend with about 50 state laws and bills that, according to the Palestinian-Israeli human rights organization Adalah, either privilege Jews or directly discriminate against the Palestinian minority. One of the key components of Israel’s nationality law, the Law of Return, for example, applies to Jews only, and excludes Palestinians, including Palestinians born in what is now the state of Israel. While Jewish citizens can move back and forth without interdiction, Israeli law expressly bars Palestinian citizens from bringing spouses from the occupied territories to live with them in Israel.

      The educational systems for the two populations in Israel (not to mention the occupied territories) are kept largely separate and unequal. While overcrowded Palestinian schools in Israel crumble, Jewish students are given access to more resources and curricular options.

      It is not legally possible in Israel for a Jewish citizen to marry a non-Jewish citizen. And a web of laws, regulations and military orders governing what kind of people can live in which particular spaces makes mixed marriages within the occupied territories, or across the pre-1967 border between Israel and the occupied territories, all but impossible.

      And so it goes in all domains of life, from birth to death: a systematic, vigilantly policed separation of the two populations and utter contempt for the principle of equality. One group — stripped of property and rights, expelled, humiliated, punished, demolished, imprisoned and at times driven to the edge of starvation (down to the meticulously calculated last calorie) — has withered. The other group — its freedom of movement and of development not merely unrestricted but actively encouraged — has flourished, and its religious and cultural symbols adorn the regalia of the state and are emblazoned on the state flag.

      The question is not whether the term “apartheid” applies here. It is why it should cause such an outcry when it is used.

      Saree Makdisi, a professor of English and comparative literature at UCLA, is the author of “Palestine Inside Out: An Everyday Occupation.”

      Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times

      Reply to Comment
    14. Sorry for the extra bits (comments, advertisement) etc., didn’t see them coming.

      Reply to Comment
      • Brian

        Thanks, Would you please post a cleaned up version so it’s easier to read and follow? Thanks.

        Reply to Comment
        • Here’s that article again, without the accoutrements –

          Your comparison to the mafia code of omerta was excellent by the way.

          May 17, 2014, 5:00 AM

          The storm of controversy after Secretary of State John F. Kerry’s warning that Israel risked becoming an “apartheid state” reminded us once again that facts, data and the apparently tedious details of international law often seem to have little bearing on conversations about Israel conducted at the highest levels of this country. As was the case when other major figures brandished the “A-word” in connection with Israel (Jimmy Carter comes to mind), the political reaction to Kerry’s warning was instantaneous and emotional. “Israel is the only democracy in the Middle East, and any linkage between Israel and apartheid is nonsensical and ridiculous,” said California Sen. Barbara Boxer. That’s that, then, eh?.
          Not quite. Flat and ungrounded assertions may satisfy politicians, but anyone who wants to push the envelope of curiosity even a little bit further might want to spend a few minutes actually thinking over the term and its applicability to Israel.
          “Apartheid” isn’t just a term of insult; it’s a word with a very specific legal meaning, as defined by the International Convention on the Suppression and Punishment of the Crime of Apartheid, adopted by the U.N. General Assembly in 1973 and ratified by most United Nations member states (Israel and the United States are exceptions, to their shame).
          According to Article II of that convention, the term applies to acts “committed for the purpose of establishing and maintaining domination by one racial group of persons over any other racial group of persons and systematically oppressing them.” Denying those others the right to life and liberty, subjecting them to arbitrary arrest, expropriating their property, depriving them of the right to leave and return to their country or the right to freedom of movement and of residence, creating separate reserves and ghettos for the members of different racial groups, preventing mixed marriages — these are all examples of the crime of apartheid specifically mentioned in the convention.
          Seeing the reference to racial groups here, some people might think of race in a putatively biological sense or as a matter of skin color. That is a rather simplistic (and dated) way of thinking about racial identity. More to the point, however, the operative definition of “racial identity” is provided in the 1965 International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (to which Israel is a signatory), on which the apartheid convention explicitly draws.
          “And so it goes in all domains of life, from birth to death: a systematic, vigilantly policed separation of the two populations.”-
          There, the term “racial discrimination” is defined as “any distinction, exclusion, restriction or preference based on race, color, descent, or national or ethnic origin which has the purpose or effect of nullifying or impairing the recognition, enjoyment or exercise, on an equal footing, of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the political, economic, social, cultural or any other field of public life.”
          A few basic facts are now in order.
          The Jewish state (for so it identifies itself, after all) maintains a system of formal and informal housing segregation both in Israel and in the occupied territories. It’s obvious, of course, that Jewish settlements in the West Bank aren’t exactly bursting with Palestinians. In Israel itself, however, hundreds of communities have been established for Jewish residents on land expropriated from Palestinians, in which segregation is maintained, for example, by admissions committees empowered to use ethnic criteria long since banned in the United States, or by the inability of Palestinian citizens to access land held exclusively for the Jewish people by the state-sanctioned Jewish National Fund.
          Jewish residents of the occupied territories enjoy various rights and privileges denied to their Palestinian neighbors. While the former enjoy the protections of Israeli civil law, the latter are subject to the harsh provisions of military law. So, while their Jewish neighbors come and go freely, West Bank Palestinians are subject to arbitrary arrest and detention, and to the denial of freedom of movement; they are frequently barred from access to educational or healthcare facilities, Christian and Muslim sites for religious worship, and so on.
          Meanwhile, Palestinian citizens of Israel must contend with about 50 state laws and bills that, according to the Palestinian-Israeli human rights organization Adalah, either privilege Jews or directly discriminate against the Palestinian minority. One of the key components of Israel’s nationality law, the Law of Return, for example, applies to Jews only, and excludes Palestinians, including Palestinians born in what is now the state of Israel. While Jewish citizens can move back and forth without interdiction, Israeli law expressly bars Palestinian citizens from bringing spouses from the occupied territories to live with them in Israel.
          The educational systems for the two populations in Israel (not to mention the occupied territories) are kept largely separate and unequal. While overcrowded Palestinian schools in Israel crumble, Jewish students are given access to more resources and curricular options.
          It is not legally possible in Israel for a Jewish citizen to marry a non-Jewish citizen. And a web of laws, regulations and military orders governing what kind of people can live in which particular spaces makes mixed marriages within the occupied territories, or across the pre-1967 border between Israel and the occupied territories, all but impossible.
          And so it goes in all domains of life, from birth to death: a systematic, vigilantly policed separation of the two populations and utter contempt for the principle of equality. One group — stripped of property and rights, expelled, humiliated, punished, demolished, imprisoned and at times driven to the edge of starvation (down to the meticulously calculated last calorie) — has withered. The other group — its freedom of movement and of development not merely unrestricted but actively encouraged — has flourished, and its religious and cultural symbols adorn the regalia of the state and are emblazoned on the state flag.

          The question is not whether the term “apartheid” applies here. It is why it should cause such an outcry when it is used.

          Saree Makdisi, a professor of English and comparative literature at UCLA, is the author of “Palestine Inside Out: An Everyday Occupation.”

          Copyright © 2014, Los Angeles Times

          Reply to Comment
    15. Brian

      Hey Eis-Woman, why don’t you write Jeffrey Goldberg and advise him to hang himself? You know, omertà and all that:

      Senior U.S. official calls Netanyahu “a chickenshit prime minister.”

      http://www.haaretz.com/mobile/.premium-1.623289

      As the ongoing crisis in U.S.-relations continues, a report by The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg cites a senior U.S. official as saying that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is “a chickenshit prime minister,” who only cares about his political survival.

      “The thing about Bibi is, he’s a chickenshit,” he was cited as saying. According to Goldberg, the Obama administration official said that Netanyahu frustrates the White House and the U.S. State Department the most.

      “The good thing about Netanyahu is that he’s scared to launch wars,” the official said. “The bad thing about him is that he won’t do anything to reach an accommodation with the Palestinians or with the Sunni Arab states. The only thing he’s interested in is protecting himself from political defeat. He’s not [Yitzhak] Rabin, he’s not [Ariel] Sharon, he’s certainly no [Menachem] Begin. He’s got no guts.”

      Another senior U.S. official told Goldberg that unlike the situation from 2010 to 2012, the White House no longer believes that Netanyahu will launch a preemptive strike on Iran to prevent it from obtaining nuclear weapons.

      “It’s too late for him to do anything,” the official said. “Two, three years ago, this was a possibility. But ultimately he couldn’t bring himself to pull the trigger. It was a combination of our pressure and his own unwillingness to do anything dramatic. Now it’s too late.”

      According to the second official, “The feeling now is that Bibi’s bluffing,” adding that “he’s not Begin at Osirak” — referring to Israel’s strike on an Iranian nuclear reactor in 1981.

      According to Goldberg, after the midterm Congressional elections on November 4 and ahead of the Palestinian move toward statehood at the United Nations, the Obama administration will no longer shield Israel at international organizations.

      Goldberg added that even if Washington vetoes the resolution the Palestinians will try to advance, it will craft an alternative resolution about the settlements and bring it to a vote. Israel would remain completely isolated internationally.

      Another possibility is for the Obama administration to present a detailed position on the core issues of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, including maps with borders of the future Palestinian state, Goldberg said.

      Reply to Comment
      • There was some israeli official on IBAs english language news (can’t remember his name), quite adamant that although there’s no love lost between Netanyahoo and Obama, the “relationship” between the US and Israel is very strong and the US is benefitting from Israel’s “battlefield tested” weapons; are said weapons stamped with the hechsher “Tested repeatedly on the citizens of Gaza”? There is absolutely zero self-awareness here.

        Reply to Comment
    16. Brian

      Sayed Kashua in the New Yorker:

      I know that in Israel people shout and carry on, How dare you compare us to South Africa? But what’s going on in the territories is separation based on race. The fact is, a settler can vote, move around freely, get Social Security and medical insurance, and a Palestinian can’t— that is separation based on race. And it’s not only in the territories but also inside the 1948 borders, when we’re talking about Arab citizens like me. How can you read in the papers this week that the Supreme Court has rejected a petition against the Admissions Committees Law, which is aimed at preventing Arab citizens from gaining access to state lands—state lands that were owned by Arabs not too long ago. (This has been happening for a long time, but now the practice has legal authority.) Is there any word but racist to describe the fact that a citizen can’t live wherever he wants in his own country, that an Arab citizen has no access to more than eighty per cent of the territory of his own country?

      Reply to Comment
    17. Yeah, right

      You know, I can read Ginger’s excoriations and I swear I’ve read it before.

      Was it reading about:
      1) Dr Pangloss (the greatest philosopher of the Holy Roman Empire!) telling us that all is for the best in this, the best of all possible worlds,
      or has it to do with:
      2) The frog-in-boiling-water experiment, where that big ol’ bullfrog is just too dumb to know when it’s time to jump out of the frying pan.

      I’ll be honest: I can’t decide which one best describes Ginger’s attitude.

      Heck, maybe there are two Ginger Elis posting here: one on the day shift and the other pulling night-duty.

      That would explain a lot…..

      Reply to Comment
    18. Marnie… you are not alone! Keep the faith! “We do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against principalities and the rulers of The Darkness of this age”.

      Reply to Comment
    19. ARTH

      Too late to matter…

      Reply to Comment
    20. Brian

      http://hum.mbreen.com/nathanOther.html

      When she goes to Israel, the place where she is finally one of the majority group, Nathan describes the feeling as thrilling. She still has no awareness of the Palestinian population: when she sees the primitive life of the Bedouin, she assumes they are “resisting the best efforts of Israel to bring them into the twentieth century”; when she picnics in a national park she, like many Israelis, has no idea that the fast-growing pines were planted to obliterate evidence of the villages from which Palestinians were ethnically cleansed in 1948. So well insulated from ordinary Israeli life and discourse are such issues that it is only after two years, provoked by curiosity at some chance encounters, that she begins to wonder about the mysteriously invisible Arab Israelis, one fifth of Israel’s inhabitants. Where do they live?

      Though it is a town of 25,000 Israeli citizens, Tamra is at first glance like a refugee camp: a cramped ghetto where buildings crowd into every available space. The inhabitants own land outside the town but the blue line of Israeli planning law encircles it tightly, preventing any expansion and forcing young couples to build illegally. Massive fines are paid periodically to the Israeli authorities to ward off threats of demolition; in the mornings, people leave homes in which they have invested their life savings not knowing if they and their children will return to find only rubble. Meanwhile, Israeli Jews live in villas with spacious gardens in nearby Mitzpe Aviv. Mitzpe Aviv is an outlook settlement, so called because its function is to overlook the Arab town of Tamra and ensure the natives don’t attempt to use or reclaim any of the land which has been confiscated from them – and, just as in the occupied territories, the pressure to claim more land from the Palestinian town is relentless. The town not only resembles a refugee camp, it turns out to be one: one third of the people in Tamra are internally displaced from nearby villages like Ein Hod; given to a colony of Jewish artists, Ein Hod is now visited by tourists who are told nothing of the people who lived there for centuries. Even worse off than Tamra are the dozens of villages unrecognized by the state where Ottoman-era title deeds are little protection. In one, the villagers are forced to disguise the kindergarten they have built for fear of Israeli spotter planes.

      Unlike apartheid South Africa, Israel lacks some of the obvious signs of apartheid: there are no segregated toilets or buses. Nonetheless discrimination against its Palestinian citizens is state-sanctioned and pervasive; laws are simply drafted to disguise it. For example, the Israel Lands Authority can claim that there is nothing in its rules that discriminates against Arabs; however, to lease a plot of state land, it requires paperwork from the Jewish Agency – and to that, no Arab need apply. Similarly, a whole raft of positions in the public and private sectors are open only to people who have done military service – from which Arabs (excepting Bedouin) are barred. Regulations on unemployment benefit are also carefully tailored to prevent Israel’s Palestinian citizens from claiming it. A separate education system for Arab children, justified in apartheid-style language and controlled by the Shin Bet, receives far less per capita funding than the Jewish system.

      The above is merely the beginning of her discoveries. Nathan had sincerely believed the romantic myths of Zionist history; as they evaporate away, she is left shocked and dizzy. Unable in conscience to live in a position of ethnic privilege, to be part of a system she saw and despised in South Africa, she decides to challenge the prejudice and hatred in Israeli society by moving to Tamra. Nathan’s Jewish friends desert her. While hurt and disillusioned by their attitude, she understands this as a herd instinct, perhaps deriving from the Holocaust: stepping outside the consensus threatens and weakens the group.

      http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0385514565?pc_redir=1414015504&robot_redir=1#productDescription_secondary_view_pageState_1414471096227

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