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IMAGE: Segregated street for Palestinians, Jews in Hebron

The West Bank has several highways on which Palestinians are not allowed to travel, but in Hebron, even a main street divides the settlers and the local Palestinians.

This picture was taken on Monday on the Shuhada street in Hebron:

Segrageted Shuhada street in Hebron, February 2012 (photo: Hithabrut-Tarabut)

Note who gets the bigger part of the road… well, nobody in Hebron ever claimed that separate is equal.

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A day of international solidarity with the Palestinian people of Hebron will take place on February 24. A protest march is planned, details [Hebrew] here.

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    COMMENTS

    1. Mik

      oh that’s unfair Noam! they get the bigger part of the road because Palestinians don’t need it (they are not allowed to drive there…)

      Reply to Comment
    2. Zsolt Sandor

      I guess some would say: Oh, this is not segregation, this is “traffic management”!

      Reply to Comment
    3. This is awful, but it doesn’t even begin to show how bad the segregation situation in Hebron really is. Never in my life have I encountered people like the settlers of Hebron.

      Reply to Comment
    4. Danny

      Yes, a picture is worth a thousand words. If it looks like apartheid, sounds like apartheid and even smells like apartheid, odds are that’s exactly what it is. The only thing left to do is wait for the world to wake up and take notice.

      Reply to Comment
    5. Steve

      Now talk about full wars against Israel and terrorism against Israel that causes Israel to want separation

      Reply to Comment
    6. Menil

      It’s important to note that this segregation against Palestinians started after an Israeli settler murdered 29 Palestinians in 1994. Yes, that’s right. Israel imposed restrictions on the victims, not on the criminals. And the people who back these terrorists are in today’s Israeli parliament and government.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cave_of_the_Patriarchs_massacre

      Next week’s the 18th anniversary of the massacre, and the yearly demonstration calling to open Shuhada St. will be held on Friday, February 24. When will Israel’s murderous apartheid in Hebron end?

      Reply to Comment
    7. Danny

      @Menil, Rabin was considering the expulsion of these squatters after Goldstein’s massacre, but at the last minute got cold feet. Being a politician, he thought it would topple his government. Now, 18 years after the massacre, this cancer has taken hold of Hebron and is literally destroying that city. Pity Rabin couldn’t see beyond petty politics to do the right thing.

      Reply to Comment
    8. Menil

      Indeed. Unfortunately Rabin paid with his life for not standing up against the Jewish terrorism which Israel always endorsed. He was the next victim.

      Reply to Comment
    9. Dani

      it should also be noted that this street used to be one of the city’s busiest marketplaces before this arrangement was imposed years ago. not only are local Palestinians denied the right to drive on their streets or walk freely in their own cities, many business were forced to close and the local economy has suffered as a result.

      Reply to Comment
    10. L. King

      One should also note that the security division was a demand by Arafat as a condition for continuing the peace talks that were underway at the time.

      ref: pp499, “Secret Channels”, Mohammed Heikal.

      “The PLO’s conditions for resumption were security measures for Palestinians in Hebron”

      Reply to Comment
    11. I’m really not surprised that its called Shuhada street.

      Reply to Comment
    12. Jazzy

      I’m against this and everything – but most of Hebron doesn’t look like this, and the universe of anti-occupation blogs makes it seem as though the whole city is some kind of military prison camp. Go on Google maps and drag the little orange man over the map and you’ll find Panoramia photos from the Arab side of the city. Its got glass office buildings and bustling streets and malls. Even though the cost/benefit doesn’t come out in favor of keeping the Israeli settlement in the city, I don’t think anyone pro-Palestinian person can really say its just and fair that no Jews should live in Hebron, given the history, without being a hypocrite.

      Reply to Comment
    13. Cortez

      Ummm H2 does…there are thousands of Palestinians who live in conditions like this. I know H1 is different but either way…they are all surrounded by an army. There’s no way to downplay it. Its one thing to live in Hebron (which I argue is neither safe for Jews nor Palestinians because of the religiosity factor)…but Hebron is also in the West Bank. These settlers are citizens of Israel. The Palestinians have not been given citizenship by Israel and have been treated as second class animals since 1967. The presence of settlers in Hebron is also a violation of international humanitarian law as well.
      .
      I would have a totally different opinion if Israel wanted to give all people of Hebron equal citizenship and equals rights…and to create non-segregated schools where children of different religions, colors and races could learn, live and play together, and ambulances would serve anyone, where Hebrew, Arabic (and maybe Aramaic too) was spoken among everyone…but that is not the case.

      Reply to Comment
    14. Jazzy

      Cortez: the IDF is there to protect the Jews from the Arabs. If the IDF wasn’t there, the Jews would not survive, let alone be able to send their children to integrated schools. That Arab and Jewish children don’t go to same schools isn’t a result of Israeli segregation of otherwise peaceable people. Your ‘let’s just integrate’ ideas are out of touch with the reality – the solution is just to get the Jews out, because the presence of 500 Jews in H2 is not viable or worth the cost in $ or in misery. I’m not saying they should stay, or that its OF the IDF to rule Palestinians by fiat for eternity, I’m just saying that there is SOMETHING regrettable about the eventuality that Jews will no longer live in Hebron, since they were massacred and expelled before, and since the city has a lot of Jewish history. If you, or me, or anyone who wants the settlers out don’t acknowledge Jewish attachment to the city, you’re not going to earn anyone’s trust enough to make pragmatic arguments to end the settlement. People won’t listen to you if they think you’re maliciously denying their feelings. That’s all…

      Reply to Comment
    15. Rob

      Israel is the Worst thing to happen to the Jewish people since the Holocaust, and Israel is the biggest threat to Jewish people in the world today.

      Discuss.

      Reply to Comment
    16. Cortez

      “Cortez: the IDF is there to protect the Jews from the Arabs. If the IDF wasn’t there, the Jews would not survive, let alone be able to send their children to integrated schools. That Arab and Jewish children don’t go to same schools isn’t a result of Israeli segregation of otherwise peaceable people. Your ‘let’s just integrate’ ideas are out of touch with the reality – the solution is just to get the Jews out, because the presence of 500 Jews in H2 is not viable or worth the cost in $ or in misery. I’m not saying they should stay, or that its OF the IDF to rule Palestinians by fiat for eternity, I’m just saying that there is SOMETHING regrettable about the eventuality that Jews will no longer live in Hebron, since they were massacred and expelled before, and since the city has a lot of Jewish history. If you, or me, or anyone who wants the settlers out don’t acknowledge Jewish attachment to the city, you’re not going to earn anyone’s trust enough to make pragmatic arguments to end the settlement. People won’t listen to you if they think you’re maliciously denying their feelings. That’s all…”
      .
      I’m pretty sure the the IDF is there to oppress Palestinians and keep Jews separated. Literally. If there was some real effort…to find a common ground or to actually solve Hebron’s issue…the Cordoba school there would have have Israeli and Palestinian children, there would be efforts to actually have a town council…with representation from both sides….Palestinians would be locked in their homes on the main street. These are really extreme, suspect and highly dubious measures for thousands of people to be under to protect less than 1,000 settlers.
      .
      Its actually kind of sad…because I’ve been to both the Jewish and Palestinian shop right across the street from each other….and to sets of nice welcoming people…but to know that they live under totally different legal standards is pretty terrible.
      .
      Out of touch of reality? You mean out of touch with normality…like the rest of Europe, the U.S., Latin America, United States, even Russia. The reality Israel…as impossible and terrible as it seems….is a warped reality that is the product of the specific actions taken by leaders. Not natural at all…there’s this great Talmudic quote…that I wish I could remember where it was exactly about how learning is best achieved in company. Moshe Dayan and Ruth Dayan knew that value (whatever you believe of their politics is something else)…but this situation? Has to be fixed.
      .
      The solution is only to get the Israelis out because its a violation of international humanitarian law specifically the Geneva and Hague convention. Technically speaking, Israeli Arabs shouldn’t be there either…but we know the treatment is quite different based on religion and apparent “race,” as evidence by the walkways and other unique and archaic factors in Hebron.
      .
      I highly doubt if Israelis were reaching out to Palestinian residents in H2 and forming community and prayer associations, and interfaith councils…or chastising others for getting involved in price tag activity or even allowing ambulances to serve Palestinians or aid workers…that we’d see such division?
      .
      Have you seen Hebron lately? Its a mess…I feel dirty walking on the other side of the barrier looking at Palestinians. Its the closest I’ve ever felt to what it may have been like to live in Apartheid South Africa or in Selma, Alabama.

      Reply to Comment
    17. Jazzy

      Cortez: if you write as though for an audience, this is boring discussion – very few people are reading this, so there’s no point in talking past me. I think we basically agree about what should happen – we just disagree about how to make the argument for it. If the settlers could have what they wanted in central Hebron without soldiers protecting them, the IDF would not be there. Are there IDF soldiers patrolling and segregating the streets of Jaffa? Of Haifa? No. There isn’t a security problem there for Jews, so Jews and Arab mix in public. You’re on the whole ‘compare Israel to white supremacist segregationists of the past’ thing, and its just not a good analogy. If you want to make an effective argument, start with acknowledging what actually motivates the IDF presence in Hebron. Its not based on the malicious nonsense you claim to believe it is. Do malicious things happen there? Yes. Are the Palestinians there oppressed? Yes. But the situation is unique and should be properly understood.

      Reply to Comment
    18. aristeides

      Jazzy – Jaffa and Haifa are in Israel. There are police patrolling the streets there, in theory enforcing the law on behalf on all citizens, Arab or Jew.

      .
      Hebron is not in Israel, it’s under military occupation, and the presence of Israeli settlers there is illegal. This is not an inconsequential difference, and it is the only way it can be properly understood.

      Reply to Comment
    19. Mik

      Jazzy, if you want a serious conversation, than of course the problem is with the Israel holding Hebron in the first place. Of course settlers are already living in the city then they need to be protected- but why be there to begin with? It’s past Israel’s border you know…

      Reply to Comment
    20. Jazzy

      Aristeides, MIK: doesn’t look like either of you read what I wrote.

      Reply to Comment
    21. aristeides

      Jazzy – do you deny that the fundamental issue is the presence of the settlers in Hebron? What you wrote about is the presence of the IDF, but the IDF is there because the settlers are there.

      Reply to Comment
    22. Jazzy

      Aristeides: No.

      Reply to Comment
    23. aristeides

      Jazzy – do you support the presence of the settlers in Hebron?

      Reply to Comment
    24. Jazzy

      Aristeides: “the solution is just to get the Jews out, because the presence of 500 Jews in H2 is not viable or worth the cost in $ or in misery.”
      I wrote this above, so, no I don’t.

      Reply to Comment
    25. aristeides

      Thank you Jazzy – I did overlook that previous post.

      .
      If I were optimistic (I’m not) I’d think it would be good if under an independent Palestine, some of the descendants of the original Jewish residents of Hebron might come there to live, with Palestinian permits.

      .
      A couple of years ago, I read a piece about one of these people, who claimed he was waiting for a Palestinian state before he would come and claim his property.

      Reply to Comment
    26. Cortez

      “If the settlers could have what they wanted in central Hebron without soldiers protecting them, the IDF would not be there. Are there IDF soldiers patrolling and segregating the streets of Jaffa? Of Haifa? No. There isn’t a security problem there for Jews, so Jews and Arab mix in public. You’re on the whole ‘compare Israel to white supremacist segregationists of the past’ thing, and its just not a good analogy. If you want to make an effective argument, start with acknowledging what actually motivates the IDF presence in Hebron. Its not based on the malicious nonsense you claim to believe it is. Do malicious things happen there? Yes. Are the Palestinians there oppressed? Yes. But the situation is unique and should be properly understood.”
      .
      I don’t necessarily think the Israeli citizens should be kicked out if Israeli was willing to treat people equally, give everyone citizens and to make concerted and genuine efforts to integration with respect for culture and religion but an eye towards the progressive development of all residents of Hebron. Right now, this is just an absurd dream.
      .
      Jaffa and Haifa are in Israel. I don’t know how you can compare. As of now, there are a host of laws and bills in the Knesset that are specifically prejudicial towards non-Jewish citizens anyway but I’m not dealing with that.
      .
      I don’t see how its not a good analogy when its the fact on the ground. People are currently being treated as sub-human on the account of citizenship(lack thereof), race, nationality and religion all in one. I used to think that Israeli Arabs might have it better when going through the territories but apparently its not the case. Ambulances serving Palestinians and aids workers are not allowed in H2? I don’t know if the South was a bad as that.
      .
      Right next to the Cordoba school in Hebron is a series of steps that connects the road (where Palestinians are banned from walking) to the school. There’s barbed wire in front of the entrance (there’s an alternative entrance through some dirt park (i’m unsure what its supposed to be). Right next to the steps is an ambulance for the H2 that serves the community (I think a military ambulance since has images of soldiers). If Palestinian child were to ever get caught up on the barbed wire…that child would bleed to death if no one was there to help because of the child’s nationality, religion and race. This is why Hebron is problematic. So yes, the situation is uniquely inhumane and understood to be a gross violation of human rights.

      Reply to Comment
    27. Jazzy

      Cortez: you’re not reading what I wrote. I only compared Haifa and Jaffa for the purpose of demonstrating that the IDF did not show up in Hebron specifically to be mean to Palestinians and for no other reason. Don’t you think its a waste of time responding to a misunderstood version of what I’ve said?

      Reply to Comment
    28. aristeides

      Jazzy – then why is the IDF in the south Hebron hills, conducting ethnic cleansing, bulldozing homes and schools and wells and cisterns to drive out the Palestinians? These people are not threatening any Jews.

      Reply to Comment
    29. Jazzy

      Aristeides: I don’t know specifically what you’re talking about, but it seems pretty obvious they want control of the land, for military, settlement, whatever purpose, I don’t know. I guess now this is going to turn into a stupid argument about how malicious the IDF is or something. Power corrupts, yes. But the super-evil Palestinian-tormenting cruel-for-its-own sake cartoon of the IDF that Cortez and others like to draw is a lie, and a waste of imagination.

      Reply to Comment
    30. Cortez

      Jazzy: ” I don’t know specifically what you’re talking about, but it seems pretty obvious they want control of the land, for military, settlement, whatever purpose, I don’t know. I guess now this is going to turn into a stupid argument about how malicious the IDF is or something. Power corrupts, yes. But the super-evil Palestinian-tormenting cruel-for-its-own sake cartoon of the IDF that Cortez and others like to draw is a lie, and a waste of imagination.”
      .
      Have you been to H2 or the areas surrounding Hebron? Or even to the Jahalin village near E1? I suggest you go and stay for a few months and watch what happens. There is no rational answer for repeat demolitions of Palestinian homes or for the 24 hour curfew that they had in Hebron. Its barbaric and really sickening and can’t be explained by any normal regulatory action. I’m guessing you’d probably wouldn’t want to watch a family’s home get demolished twice in season. Idk if this is an issue of power corrupting…it seems to be motivated by animus and irrationality.
      .
      I really suggest you visit though. I’m not saying you have to care about it…but watching this stuff happen seems like the acts of some cruel tormenter.

      Reply to Comment
    31. aristeides

      Jazzy – the fact that there is an excuse for the presence of the IDF in Hebron doesn’t make the gratuitous cruelty of the IDF there a lie. Reports of incidents of brutality are now up since the Golani outfit has been stationed there. This would seem to be solely for its own sake.

      .
      As for the villages, it’s clear that Israel wants the land and the IDF is engaged in ethnic cleansing on orders. How does this make their activities less cruel and malicious?

      Reply to Comment
    32. Gil Franco

      What are the plans for the Jewish settlements in Hebron and Kiryat Arba under the various 2-state, landswap proposals? I have never seen anything that addresses this directly. It seems to me that it would be a major sticking point (on a scale Jerusalem and ROR) because of their location and the Jewish history in the city.

      Reply to Comment
    33. Piotr Berman

      We were discussing an attack on Swedish Education Minister, because he was in “white Hebron” in a company of an Arab. Hebron settlers are an unusually nasty bunch, and IDF serves them.

      And of course IDF and settlers want to convert Hebron into a small ghetto by removing all villages from Area C. Settlers in Hebron are a small monstrocity that is a part of a large monstrocity. This is not about security but about supremacy.

      Reply to Comment
    34. Palestinian

      excuse ? ahhhh you mean protecting the illegal settlers (thieves) ?

      Reply to Comment
    35. aristeides

      Palestinian – excactly. But even that excuse can’t extend to the ethnic cleansing of Saadet Tha’lah and Ar Rakeez, for example, conducted not by the settlers but for them, by the IDF.

      Reply to Comment
    36. Jazzy

      Aristeides: that the underlying motive for IDF behavior is asserting control, or taking land, makes their behavior less malicious than if they showed up purely to torment people. That their abuse is largely incidental makes their behavior less malicious. Malice is a state of mind, not an observable action. Are you going to debate the meaning of ‘malice’ now?

      Reply to Comment
    37. Jazzy

      Cortez: I think your suggestion that the IDF demolishes houses for its own sake, or just to watch others suffer, is disingenuous. Their tactics are mostly asserting control – is cruelty involved? Yes. Is bulling involved? Yes. But Israel doesn’t spend time and money demolishing houses out of pure sadism. All of this devilish cruelty talk has something of the supernaturally evil Jew trope in it, and it doesn’t reflect reality. Its a slow boiling ethnic war – that’s the way to look at it, not as the devious schemes of the wicked witch of Tel Aviv.

      Reply to Comment
    38. aristeides

      Jazzy – I imagine their victims are not concerned with such niceties and nuances.

      Reply to Comment
    39. Cortez

      Jazzy: “I think your suggestion that the IDF demolishes houses for its own sake, or just to watch others suffer, is disingenuous. Their tactics are mostly asserting control – is cruelty involved? Yes. Is bulling involved? Yes. But Israel doesn’t spend time and money demolishing houses out of pure sadism. All of this devilish cruelty talk has something of the supernaturally evil Jew trope in it, and it doesn’t reflect reality. Its a slow boiling ethnic war – that’s the way to look at it, not as the devious schemes of the wicked witch of Tel Aviv.”
      .
      What else could it be? Can you explain why the IDF continues to make people homeless or why they can’t treat people fairly? Or why its necessary to confiscate legitimately bought water tanks and prevent access natural water for families and children. I can understand maybe one or the other but both? Or why an ambulance can’t enter H2 to serve a Palestinian or Aid Worker? I could understand if the IDF only allowed their ambulance to serve everyone…but to prevent access to another population? A bit too much. In addition, under the Hague Regulations and Geneva Convention, Israel has a duty to administer the territories including Hebron for the safety and benefit of the occupied population. The IDF’s actions don’t meet this standard in any capacity…what else could explain gross disregard for humanitarian law(meant to protect Palestinians, Jews, Arabs, Christians, Americans whenever they are occupied by a hostile force so they can be respected as humans).
      .
      Governments have so many creative ways to exercise control over populations they don’t like or foreign populations or even highly defiant populations without resorting to making people homeless or taking away essential resources.
      .
      Devilish cruelty talk? Evil Jew trope? Are you serious? There are Jews in Russian Oblasts, Jews in Iran, Jews in South Africa…and elsewhere who’re living their lives fully, greatly and with pride about their religion, national and community and with moral concern about the plight of others who are not defined by the the IDF’s action. Jewish culture, history and its future is greater, richer and deeper than the IDF, and by default, Israel’s absurd conduct.

      Reply to Comment
    40. Jazzy

      Cortez: I’ve already explained the IDF behaves as it does, and now you’re just asking me again. You’re doing the thing where you’re speaking for the camera, to the cult, not to me. REALITY CHECK: there is absolutely nobody reading what you wrote who isn’t educated about this issue, there is nobody for you to educate – if you want to have a discussion that respond to what I say, don’t just bring up different points and talk past me.

      Reply to Comment
    41. aristeides

      It’d be simpler to criticize the Israeli occupation if it weren’t conducted by Jews. Then people could point out cases of egregious sadistic brutality, and no one could come along to excuse it with lines like “the supernaturally evil Jew trope.” How convenient for the apologists.

      Reply to Comment
    42. Piotr Berman

      “That their abuse is largely incidental makes their behavior less malicious. Malice is a state of mind, not an observable action.”

      A sadistic institutional behavior does not require participants to be sadistic. People readily inflict pain and suffering if they are so commanded and explained a “higher goal”, and perhaps more sadly, people readily plan inflicting pain and suffering when they perceive a “higher goal”. Check “Milgram experiment” and “Dahiya doctrine”.

      Within an organization, you may be uncomfortable with its conduct, or fully accepting. Clearly, the second kind of individual would tend to advance, and the first, to drop out. And if you accept the goals and methods, you may enjoy your work.

      In judging behavior of various institutional actors it is pointless to discuss if the members of the institution acted on personal malice. Government of Sudan had real problems in controlling chaotic insurgency in Darfur and arrived at cost-effective ways of handling the situation. “Some eggs were broken”, but one has to admit that Sudan had neither funds, nor technologies, nor a disciplined institutional framework to implement more a “pretty” set of policies.

      From what I have seen, outsiders criticizing Sudan on that matter did not try to analyze the reasons for the atrocities (other than conjecturing ethnic and cultural bias), but merely the effects. Which lead to a variety of sanctions and indictments.

      Reply to Comment
    43. Jazzy

      Aristeides: its probably to your benefit that the occupation is conducted by Jews because if it weren’t, most people would care a lot less about it and you’d be even more alone

      Reply to Comment
    44. aristeides

      Jazzy – First, there is no benefit to me in this situation.

      .
      Second, you confirm my point. Because the occupation is conducted by Jews, Israeli apologists will always use the antisemitism card to defend and perpetuate it. If the news somehow managed to report events without identifying the ethnicity of the participants, too many people wouldn’t know what to think.

      .
      There is absolutely nothing in common between some “myth of the supernaturally evil Jew” and the very unsupernatural thugs of the IDF, but you feel free to drag in this smear.

      Reply to Comment
    45. John

      I think you should make some allowances for the young Israeli Army soldiers, many of whom are distressed at the role they are forced to fulfil. The fact that numbers of them join organisations like Breaking The Silence after completing their period of national service shows that they are affected by the work they are made to carry out. In some cases – regrettably – some of these young people end up committing suicide.

      Reply to Comment
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