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IDF spokesperson expresses regret over killing of single Palestinian child

You really have to give credit where credit is due. Even if it is to the IDF. Soldiers killed 12-year-old Muhammad al-Anati during clashes with local youth in the Hebron area on Sunday. According to reports, al-Anati was killed after being struck by a bullet in the back, and was not involved in the clashes.

An Israeli soldier throws a stun grenade at Palestinian protesters in Beit Furik. (photo: Ahmad al-Bazz/Activestills.org)

An Israeli soldier throws a stun grenade at Palestinian protesters in Beit Furik. (photo: Ahmad al-Bazz/Activestills.org)

However, it seems that the IDF is willing to learn from past mistakes. This time, unlike recent similar events, the IDF Spokesperson’s Unit immediately released a message [Hebrew] saying an inquiry had been launched and that the army expressed its regret over al-Anati’s death. One can hope that the inquiry will be a serious and effective one.

For the sake of comparison, it is worth remembering that over the course of the 14 years that preceded Operation Protective Edge, the Israeli army killed 1,384 minors in the West Bank and Gaza. Among them was 13-year-old candy seller Mohammad Jihd Dudin, who was shot to death by soldiers during riots he did not participate in. In May, two youths were shot dead while not posing any threat to soldiers during clashes in Betunia, one of them in the back. The IDF Spokesperson’s Unit changed its official statement several times, and to this day has not shown remorse or found anyone responsible for the killing.

Palestnians carry Mohammad Qasem Hamamreh, after he was injured in the head with a tear gas canister at the early morning of July 23, during clashes with the Israeli army in the West Bank village of Husan, 2014. Mohammad, 19 years old, died in the hospital the day after (Mustafa Bader/Activestills.org)

Palestnians carry Mohammad Qasem Hamamreh, after he was injured in the head with a tear gas canister at the early morning of July 23, during clashes with the Israeli army in the West Bank village of Husan, 2014. Mohammad, 19 years old, died in the hospital the day after (Mustafa Bader/Activestills.org)

Since the start of Operation Protective Edge, some 400 additional children have been killed in Gaza. Now another one is added to the list. I’m sure the al-Anati family takes comfort in the IDF’s expressing sadness over the killing.

Read this post in Hebrew on Local Call.

Related:
How will Gaza’s children carry their scars into adulthood?
Beitunia killings: Autopsy reveals Palestinian teen shot by live fire
In IDF fantasy video, Palestinians are allowed to protest

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    1. Pedro X

      A good question would be do Palestinians regret the their own actions?

      Do they regret and reject the education of their children into a culture of death which glorifies and rewards killers of Israelis and holds them up for emulation of their children? When they emulate their elders and engage in violent activities are they condemned or praised? Does Palestinian society protect their children or does it place them in the line of fire?

      Do they regret or encourage and facilitate their children and young adults to participate in violent activities? Who piles the piles of stones on the ground in advance for riots for children to throw? Who places bricks, slabs of concrete and rocks on roof tops for young Palestinians to throw? Who makes the Molotov cocktails for children to throw? Who cancels school so that children can join riots?

      We all know the answer to these questions. Mathew Kalman reported in the second intifada that the PA used to round up children and drive them to places where clashes were happening to act as fodder and shield the fighters. Children were and are used as look outs, mules, Molotov cocktail makers, suicide bombers, attackers and operatives.

      Palestinians regularly organize riots. For instance, in 2013 after the death of a prisoner in custody, Mr. Jaradat, the Palestinians orchestrated riots. Palestinian women collected and piled up rocks. Other people made Molotov cocktails. Palestinian closed schools to permit students to join the riots. Instructions to the hot points were texted over cell phones. Violent riots ensued and Palestinian children were injured. The other day Palestinians called for a day of rage.

      One only has to go to memri.org or palwatch.org to see how Palestinian society incubates its young to resort to violent confrontation against Israelis.

      Reply to Comment
    2. Felix Reichert

      Anopther question would be:

      Do the Israelis regret the culture of racial and cultural superiority, in which they grow up and are educated in?

      Do they regret forcing their young people into a military that daily opresses millions of people in a kafkaesk system of checkpoints, raids, arrests, land-theft, unequal distribution of water, chokeholding the Pal. economy (in Gaza AND the Westbank), supression of peaceful protests, etc.?

      Do they regret the praise and cult around terrorist organisations like the Irgun and other jewish terror groups in the British mandate and young Israel?

      Do they regret that their children are (mostly) educated in segregated schools, thus stimulating and enforcing a culture of racism and cultural chauvinism?

      Violence (especially if it is as opressive as the Israeli violence, that has raged for decades) begets violence. Opressed people will always over-react, at least some them.

      For reference, see every form of national opression in the world, ever.

      Take for example Native Americans commiting massacres against settlers, kidnapping women and children, etc. in the 19th century.

      By the way, I’d like to have sources for some of your claims: (1) that someone collects rocks in advance (as if they weren’t lying around readily…), (2) that someone “orchestrates” riots, instead of just “organiszing a demonstration against an illegal and opressive military dictatorship” (as I would call it), (3) that children are used by the PA(!) as suicide bombers, (4) that the PA closed schools “to permit children to join riots” (instead of calling them demonstrations), etc.

      Have fun providing them.

      Reply to Comment
      • Felix Reichert

        Of course I want some real, credible sources, not some right-wing extremist bullship sites.

        Reply to Comment
      • CigarButNoNice

        “Violence (especially if it is as opressive as the Israeli violence, that has raged for decades) begets violence. Opressed people will always over-react, at least some them. … Take for example Native Americans commiting massacres against settlers, kidnapping women and children, etc. in the 19th century.”

        For the indigenous resisting the oppressing settler, everything is permitted, huh? So all I have to do is show you how the Jews are the indigenous of the Land of Israel while the Arabs are settlers and then everything the Jews do will be acceptable.

        I like that, you know? Bombing Gaza as a reaction of the indigenous (the Jews) to Arab settler-colonial oppression. Disproportionate, you say? So what? According to your quote: Oppressed people will always over-react, at least some them. I’m sure you understand.

        Reply to Comment
    3. JG

      You are not indigenous, get it dumb, Your “holy” books are not fact based and a fucking fairytale, causes by too much sun, goat love and drugs.

      Reply to Comment
      • CigarButNoNice

        “You are not indigenous,…”

        Seeing as the Jewish nation is the oldest extant with an unbroken cultural connection to this land, yes we are. No matter what fictions you invent to try to contradict this.

        “Your ‘holy’ books…”

        I was not referencing the Bible, dumbo. If I had, I’d have said the Jews’ national rights stemmed from God’s gift of the Land of Israel, not from being its indigenes. You anti-Zionists always see what you want to see. Just like you always see “racism” everywhere you look.

        Since you’re for avoiding narratives that are “not fact based” and are just “a f***ing fairytale,” I reckon you’re going to drop the bogus yarn of a non-Jewish “Palestinian nation from time immemorial,” right? Nobody in the West had heard of any such nation prior to 1960, and before 1947 even they hadn’t call themselves such.

        Arabs they were and Arabs they are; Arab imperialism is all that’s behind the push against the Jewish State, the rightful political possession of the Jewish nation as the indigenous of the Land of Israel.

        Reply to Comment
        • Mike Panzone

          The statute of limitations has run out for the jewish nation which ended 2000 years ago when rome sent most of the jews to europe. it was an unfortunate event but it happened. letting jews re-establish a jewish nation in 1948 goes against the modern day concept of secular constitutional democracies. great britain is a country for the brittish, many of whom are jewish, muslim, atheist, white, black, asian; they do not call it the united christian kingdom. by doing so it would automatically make people of minority religions second class citizens. can you not see how a jewish state in the 21st century is as anachronistic and out dated as an islamic republic?

          Reply to Comment
      • Whiplash

        Evidence extraneous to the “holy books” of Jewish presence as a people goes back to the Bronze Age. The Egyptian Pharaoh Merneptah in 1207 B.C.E. recognized the people of Israel. The Pharoah Sheshonk on his victory stele mentions his campaign in Israel in the 10th century B.C.E. Shalmaneser names the Israeli King Ahab at the battle of Quarar in 853 B.C.E. The Mesha steel of the King of Moab refers to the temple goods he plundered of the God Yahweh. The Dan Stele (841 B.C.E.) refers to the House of David.

        Jewish tribes before coalescing into a people and then a nation state were part of the people known as Canaanites and incorporated other Canaanites, such as the Jebusites and Shechemites into the Israeli nation state. Israelis are as indigenous to the land of Israel as you can get.

        One more fact the Jewish people maintained a presence in Israel from the time of the Bar Kokhba revolt to the presence. They numbered in the hundreds of thousands within Israel around the time that Arab Imperialism and Islamic colonialism first took root in Israel, Syria and the Maghreb in the 7th Century C.E. They never gave up their rights to the land of Israel. Their numbers grew smaller but some remained in and others returned to the land of their forefathers until they gained a critical mass to re-establish the Israeli nation state.

        Reply to Comment
        • Mike Panzone

          …these facts mean nothing and make no difference. this is literally ancient history you are talking about. i’m a white american and there is no way i’m letting native americans have my house back because they were here first 200 years ago.

          Reply to Comment
          • Whiplash

            This is not ancient history but living history since the Jewish people have already come back to their land and are not leaving. The international community in 1922 recognized Jewish people’s historical rights to re-establish their home in Mandate Palestine. The Arabs fought the unanimous consensus of the international community as represented by the League of Nations to allow the Jewish people 0.6% of the former land of the Ottoman Empire for their home. As a result the Arab Palestinians having failed to accept the partition plan lost their right to a country of their own which they could have had, had thy accepted the partition plan instead of trying to commit genocide against the emergent Jewish nation.

            Reply to Comment
          • Mike Panzone

            And the international community in 1922 was wrong to do this…just as it would be wrong today for the international community to insist that the US revert back to being a native american homeland based on native american religion.

            Reply to Comment
          • Pedro X

            Why was it wrong? Jews made up more than 1% of the Ottoman Empire. So why was setting aside an area of 0.6% of the empire for Jews wrong? If you look at the Ottoman Empire Census of 1914 there are 22 ethnic peoples recorded, including Jews. There are no Palestinians as a recognized identity. The provinces of the empire are set out. There is no Palestine province. There was no single province which incorporated the lands which made up Mandated Palestine. You will see in the census provinces of Beirut and Syria, but no Palestine.

            The world reorganized the Ottoman Empire to allow many Arab peoples to obtain their own country. Why was it wrong for the world to set up one tiny area for a Jewish home to be re-established, while setting aside 99% of the Ottoman Empire for Arabs?

            Reply to Comment
    4. Mike Panzone

      oh and also, as far as the “Palestinian nation from time immemorial”, yes that is bogus too. nations are born sometimes over night when the RESIDENT people of a land decide to create a government. the jews of eruope in the early 1900s were not residents of the middle east when they began immigrating to what is today israel. it was a land made up mainly of arabs with a minority group of jews, both of which groups had been there for generations. those resident arabs and jews were the ONLY ones who had any right to create a nation there. the modern day zionist claim to the land of israel was wrong, simply for the reason that they were european and had never set foot in the land of israel. any claim that european jews are indigenous to the middle east is as ridiculous as the claim that an american of english ancestry is indigenous to england. zionism is based on flawed, illogical thinking.

      Reply to Comment
      • CigarButNoNice

        “the modern day zionist claim to the land of israel was wrong, simply for the reason that they were european and had never set foot in the land of israel.”

        You don’t understand how Judaism works. A Jew is not defined by genetics, nor by place of birth; a Jew is someone born to a Jewish mother or converted, and any Jew is automatically an indigene of the Land of Israel by virtue of being Jewish. We learn this from God’s answer to Moses when he begged entrance to the Land of Israel: “Joseph called himself a Hebrew while you did not” i.e. Moses kept silent when Jethro’s daughters spoke of him as an Egyptian man. As Moses was really born in Egypt, the conclusion (of the Sages of Judaism) is that any Jew is a native of the Land of Israel no matter where he or she was born.

        And nobody gets to say otherwise. Not even the International Kangaroo Court of Law.

        As for the Arabs, they’re indigenous to the Arabian Peninsula. They have no right to any part of the Land of Israel. In the name of justice, they will have to leave the Land of Israel; no justice, no peace!

        Reply to Comment
        • Mike Panzone

          i do get it. judaism is tied to their land just as muslims are tied to theirs.

          christ came and said that god no longer wants to inhabit a temple or a land. he wants to abide in the heart of man. this is the basis of christianity. there is no need for a “holy land” anymore, since the kingdom of god is a spiritual connection of people around the world.

          this is an evolution of the “religion of god” that makes better sense than the ridiculous idea that one can belong to a religion based on their birth parent.

          Reply to Comment
          • Mike Panzone

            …and i’m not talking here of christianity from the middle ages when kings and priests departed from the intentions of the new testament and turned christianity into a state religion. when that happened, religions wars were the rule of the day…kind of like the wars brought about by today’s jewish state and islamic republics.

            Reply to Comment
        • Eliza

          It is irrelevant how Judaism works. Judaism is just another religion; all religions have their internal rules re who is, or is not, a member of that religion.

          The problem is trying to equate membership of a religion as the sole criteria for citizenship of a nation state. People who identify as Jews, who were born and/or are citizens in USA, EU, Iran etc are not citizens of Israel. Israel does not speak for or represent Jews in general. Most Jews actually choose not to live in Israel. Many Jews are horrified that Israel purports to speak in their name.

          Your wonky definition of what a nation state is puts Israel in a class of its own. All other nation states are states for all of their people (even if there are instances where one class of people is privileged over others). Israel, as the nation state of all Jews is nonsensical. This way of thinking will grind away Israel as it is now known today.

          People who identify as Jewish should have equal rights as others – not extra rights.

          Reply to Comment
      • Gustav

        “the jews of eruope in the early 1900s were not residents of the middle east when they began immigrating to what is today israel.”

        But now, many of us have been here for 150 years and some of us for 2000 years because we never left.

        So, we too like you, ain’t going anywhere no matter what people say. And if they talk too much of statute of limitations, then we remind them that such reasoning is equally valid against Arabs. Particularly since they have 22 Arab Islamic countries they can go to in the rest of the Middle East and North Africa, while we only have little Israel to call our own.

        Reply to Comment
        • Mike Panzone

          “they have 22 Islamic countries they can go to”
          what a silly argument. why should the arabs who live in israel/palestine be expected to leave their homes and everything they have ever known and go to another islamic country? that’s like saying the latinos of guatemala have 14 other spanish speaking countries so they should be okay with vacating guatemala to make way for some other group.

          should jews be forced to vacate israel? of course not. 7 million israelis are to go where? arabs need to accept this fact, that most israelis were born there and didn’t ask to be.

          …but if arabs are to admit this, then israel must first admit that the establishment of israel should never have happened, israel must acknowledge that it was an injustice to the palestinian arabs to deny them the right to vote on their own government after turkey left, and the world must accept that it was wrong for the international commmunity to impose a jewish state upon residents of a land who were not jewish.

          i’m not against israel or jewish people…they are there to stay. but i AM against a jewish state.

          Reply to Comment
    5. Gustav

      Straw man argument alert.

      I never said the Arabs have to go elsewhere. I just said they already have 22 countries and a huge land mass.

      You on tbe other hand, Mike want us to go to Europe. Even though, I repeat, many of us lived here (our families) 150 years and some of is 2000 years. But that doesn’t count does it Mike?

      Reply to Comment
      • Mike Panzone

        i clearly stated that israelis are in israel to stay…
        “i’m not against israel or jewish people…they are there to stay. but i AM against a jewish state”

        you said, “we only have little Israel to call our own”
        …no, jews participate fully as citizens in america and other countries where people have bought into the democratic ideals of total equality for all in a secular democratic state. israel should buy into that as well by writing a secular constitution and ceasing to identify itself as a jewish state.

        Reply to Comment
        • Gustav

          “i clearly stated that israelis are in israel to stay…”

          Look Mike, you sound to be a nice guy. If I lnew you in person, I would probably like you. But you are an idealist. You don’t know anything about the Middle East. I won’t and I probabably can’t educate you about it because I suspect that you are the kind of person who sees the world as you would like it to be, rather than what it actually is.

          But I will say this, once and once only. Here in the Middle East, minorities don’t thrive. And given our historical experience, not just in the Middle East but in Europe too, we are not going back to the past. We are going to keep our Jewish majority state. That does not mean that we can’t have a non Jewish minority. We can and we do. Our challenge is to treat them well. It isn’t easy during a time of war in which they want to make us, at best a minority in our own country, or at worst, murder and exile us. Nevertheless we have to work at it.

          As far as giving up our Jewish majority state, it won’t happen. It won’t happen, no matter what!

          Reply to Comment
          • Mike Panzone

            I understand what happened to the jews in the past. In order to remedy their sad history ,they chose to create a jewish majority state. However, they plopped it down in a devastating location, right on top of a bunch of muslims. This time, the jews have no one to blame but themselves for their misery. Their plan is destined to fail. Little israel can not stand alone forever. This is why an alternative to a jewish state must be found. This is not idealism…it is realism.

            Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            “This time, the jews have no one to blame but themselves”

            Mike it isn’t even about blaming anyone for “our misery” as you put it. It is about facing reality. This is just the way things are. We accept that this is the world we live in and we deal with it the bast way we can. Israel is our home. It always was and we will defend it to the last man woman and child. If we fall, the entire Middle East will fall too. And that will not be so good for the rest of the world either. That is reality.

            Reply to Comment
          • Mike Panzone

            “If we fall, the entire Middle East will fall too”
            How very true. The middle east wouldnt be in such a mess if israel hadnt been formed…and now the whole place is on the verge of blowing up. When it all goes down the tubes, at least we will be able to say that the zionists had their day in the sun with their jewish majority state.

            Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            Mike, if we fall, we won’t be the only ones to fall. We will have good company. So I am not so sure that those who dislike us so much would be able to gloat.

            Reply to Comment
          • Reza Lustig

            “I’ll burn it all (Gotham City) down before I let a FREAK have it.”

            -Gangster Carmine Falcone, to Two-Face

            Batman: The Long Halloween

            Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            Crap on Lustig.

            We have had enough persecutions for 10 life times. Yes if you and your ilk try to do more of it, you will burn in hell with us.

            You don’t like it? Lump it!

            Reply to Comment
          • Victor

            At the most basic level Jews and Palestinains have to come to terms with the most basic and essential fact that neither group is going away. Israel is a very young country and has a lot to learn. Perhaps its biggest tragedy (and irony) is being born in the wake of the Shoah and the emerging doctrines of international law and human rights. How mush simpler things could have been if Israel had been born in the 18th or 19th centuries and its settlers could have followed in the footsteps of the US, Canada, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand in dealing with the native people.

            Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            “Perhaps its biggest tragedy (and irony) is being born in the wake of the Shoah and the emerging doctrines of …”

            …. hypocrisy? Double Standards? Shovetheotherguunderthebusforthesakeofone’sownselfinterest?

            Is that what you meant to say Victor? If you were, then you and I are on the same space.

            Otherwise, not so much.

            Reply to Comment
    6. MIkesailor

      The one thing you have to say about hasbaristas like Pedro, Cigat, Gustav and Whip is how practiced they are at distracting from the issue of the IDF killing Palestinian children at will and with impunity. Notice how none ever expresses any regret over these murders, let alone demand that the Israeli government punish the guilty. Instead they whine about a “Jewish” state and cry crocodile tears about “peace”. When they only peace they really want is the “peace of the gtave” for all Palestinians. Mever whine to me about the Warsaw ghetto while you are committing similar or worse crimes in Gaza.

      Reply to Comment
      • Gustav

        Sailor

        You are just a fool. You are complaining that no one expresses regreat about the deaths of children? Have you had a look at the title of this article?

        As for your Warsaw Ghetto analogy. It is just obscene. Last time I checked, the Jews of Warsaw Ghetto were marked for death by haters like you, irrespective of how they behaved. The Gazans on the other hand, always have and had a choice. If they give up their attacks on Israeli civilians, no one would bug them and they could have happy, healthy and productive lives.

        Reply to Comment
    7. Mikesailor

      Come on Gustav, you can whine better than that. Now bomb another UN school or shell boys playing soccer on the beach or blow up another hospital and tell me about Warsaw. Yes, they were marked for death in Poland but isn’t Israeli policy to allow Gazans only their lives in prison: no freedom, no travel, no exports and no imports without the “permission of their Israeli and Egyptian overlords. Whine about how nobody understands you and then come to the realization that the “other” perhaps understands you only too well. I see more Palestinians are killed in the West Bank by the Israeli military. The IDF is “investigating but tell me: How many Israeli soldiers or police have ever served time for killing Palestinians? How many settlers homes have been demolished for killing this “other’? How plausible are Israeli “investigations”? How many Israelis demand that guilty Jews be punished when the victim isn’t Jewish? The only hatred I have is for the hypocrisy of people who should know better. That should know that “justice” is universal, and there is no exemption for any one group. That deliberately killing civilians and destroying civilian infrastructure is a crime which should be punished, no matter who commits it.

      Reply to Comment
      • Gustav

        The only one whining here is you and Hamas, every time we react to their attacks.

        They don’t even want to accept cease fires because they have arse holes like you whining on their behalf every time they obscenely trot out their dead and injured after we shoot back at them.

        Now go and unbomb Hiroshima and Nagasaki then come back and lecture to me arse hole.

        Reply to Comment
        • Tzila

          WIth whom is Israel discussing the cease of fire and the conditions for that ?, and of course I don’t want “to lecture to you” anything .

          Reply to Comment
      • JohnW

        The following text is part of the agreement signed by Israel and the PLO in the Oslo accords:

        “4. Except for the arms, ammunition and equipment of the Palestinian Police described in Annex I, and those of the Israeli military forces, no organization, group or individual in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip shall manufacture, sell, acquire, possess, import or otherwise introduce into the West Bank or the Gaza Strip any firearms, ammunition, weapons, explosives, gunpowder or any related equipment, unless otherwise provided for in Annex I.”

        Before 2007 when Hamas ousted the PLO, the PLO adhered to this agreement (mostly). So there was no blockade of Gaza.

        After Hamas took over, they clearly stated that they are not willing to abide by past agreements with Israel. Israel therefore had to blockade Gaza in order to prevent Hamas importing advanced weapons with which it would be able to attack Israel more effectively. So the blockade of Gaza is both legal and necessary.

        Reply to Comment
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