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Hundreds protest forced transfer, destruction of Palestinian village Susya

Despite a pending High Court case, the village is facing imminent destruction and forced population transfer. State Department, EU foreign ministers have all called on Israel to let the villagers stay on their land.

Hundreds of Palestinian, Israeli and international activists march into the Palestinian village of Susya, demanding that Israel not demolish it, Suysa, South Hebron Hills, July 24, 2015. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Hundreds of Palestinian, Israeli and international activists march into the Palestinian village of Susya, demanding that Israel not demolish it, Suysa, South Hebron Hills, July 24, 2015. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Over 500 Palestinian, Israeli and international activists descended on the tiny Palestinian tent-village of Susya on Friday to protest its imminent demolition and the forced transfer of its residents.

The activists marched through the village, stopping at various homes along their way to hear the stories of families facing eviction and transfer.

At the end of the demonstration activists hung a massive banner in view of passing settlers, declaring that Susya is here to stay.

Activists hang a massive sign on the main road leading to the former site of the village, to ensure that Israeli settlers see it, July 24, 2015. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Activists hang a massive sign on the main road leading to the former site of the village, to ensure that Israeli settlers see it, July 24, 2015. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Palestinian parliamentarian Mustafa Barghoutti, one of few politicians who attended the protest, praised the non-violent popular resistance model adopted by the residents of Susya and many other Palestinian villages. “Combining popular resistance on the ground, international solidarity and boycott, divestment and sanctions against Israeli policies,” Barghoutti said, “is very productive and very effective at this stage.”

Susya has been the recipient of seemingly unprecedented international diplomatic and media attention in recent weeks and months. European foreign ministers, the U.S. State Department, and activists around the world are all demanding that Israel refrain from destroying the village and to legalize its status.

The Israeli army first demolished the village of Khirbet Susya, deep in the desolate south Hebron Hills, three decades ago, on the grounds that it was located on an archeological site. Susya’s residents, many of whom lived in caves on the site for generations, packed up and moved a few hundred meters away, onto their adjacent agricultural lands.

The IDF, which as the occupying power controls nearly every aspect of Palestinians’ lives in the West Bank, never recognized the validity of the move. To this day, the village has no connections to electricity or running water, and its access roads are not paved.

On the other hand, when it comes to unauthorized Jewish settlements, all of which squat on Palestinian land, Israeli authorities supply electricity, water, security and more. The terms “double standard” or “discrimination” don’t even begin to describe the dual realities in that part the West Bank.

Palestinian girls chant slogans at the protest against the demolition of their village, Susya, July 24, 2015. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Palestinian girls chant slogans at the protest against the demolition of their village, Susya, July 24, 2015. (Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

The Israeli army has issued repeated demolition orders against the village on the grounds that none of its tents and tin shacks were erected with the proper permits. The army’s Civil Administration, however, rejects 90 percent of Palestinian planning requests.

The army has made no attempt to find a legal solution that would allow Susya’s residents to stay on their land. It intends to transfer them to the nearby city of Yatta, which is in Area A – under Palestinian Authority rule. Susya is in Area C.

Twenty years ago, on an explicitly temporary and transitional basis, the Oslo Accords divided the West Bank into three “Areas”: A, B and C. Area C, which comprises over 60 percent of the West Bank, is under full Israeli control. A significant portion of the current Israeli government has explicitly stated its desire to annex this area to Israel, in contravention of international law.

In such a scenario, Israel would want to annex as much land as possible with as few Palestinians as possible – hence, efforts and plans to transfer and dispossess Bedouin and Palestinian residents of the south Hebron Hills and Jordan Valley.

A view of the tents that comprise most of Susya, July 24, 2015. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org) Israeli authorities reject 90 percent of Palestinian planning requests, which means that almost all new Palestinian homes in the area are built without permits, putting them at risk of demolition.

A view of the tents that comprise most of Susya, July 24, 2015. (Oren Ziv/Activestills.org) Israeli authorities reject 90 percent of Palestinian planning requests, which means that almost all new Palestinian homes in the area are built without permits, putting them at risk of demolition.

Speaking during a solidarity visit to Susya with other diplomats last month, UN Humanitarian Coordinator Daniela Owen said that Israeli plans to destroy the village could amount to forced transfer. Such a move “would be contrary to Israel’s obligations under the Fourth Geneva Convention, International Humanitarian Law and human rights law obligations.”

Susya’s residents are currently fighting in the Israeli High Court of Justice in one last bid to stay on their land. That case is pending, but two months ago a High Court justice, who just happens to be a West Bank settler himself, refused to issue an injunction against the demolition while the case is pending.

Military bulldozers have been parked adjacent to the village of Susya for some weeks now and residents were reportedly told that the demolitions would take place after the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, which ended last week.

Villagers are hoping that the international spotlight put on their struggle might be enough to save their homes from what otherwise appears to be imminent destruction and forced population transfer of its roughly 300 residents.

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    1. Whiplash

      There was never a Palestinian village called Susya. The court has on numerous occasions held Susya did not exist after reviewing maps, Ottoman and British records, travelogues and birth registries. These people who say they live there are squatters. People who lived in tents and caves for a few weeks a year did not constitute a village.

      Bring on the bulldozers and lets get this farce over with, already. Send the squatters back to Yata from whence they came. Then Justice will be done.

      Reply to Comment
      • Weiss

        Your transformation into David Duke is almost complete!

        Next up: Your kick the baby class in parental guidance…

        What a PSYCHO…

        Reply to Comment
      • susy

        Most of the settlements in the Palestinian territories don’t have any historical or religious justification (if any exists). Your double-standards qualify the person that you are.

        Reply to Comment
        • Pedro X

          Suzy says that most of the Jewish communities in the Palestinian territories have no historical or religious justification. First of all, this is not Palestinian territory, it is Judea and Samaria, the land of Israel in which Arabs and Jews now live. It is said to be the heartland of the Israeli people for good reason. The Jews are the indigenous people of the land.

          In the Bronze age of the second millennium BCE an Israeli people arose out of the peoples of the land of Canaan. They left the lowland Canaanite culture of Canaanite city states to inhabit the highlands of Samaria and would spread to Judea. They tilled unbroken land and set roots deep in the soil of Judea and Samaria. Towns, villages and agricultural communities spread across Samaria during the Iron age with the population growing greatly. Over two centuries the Nation State the Hebrew people was founded. Jews filled the land and every inch of Judea and Samaria has historical significance to the Jewish people.

          This is the land of the Jewish prophets, judges, kings and people. Deborah in the hills of Ephraim was a prophetess, judge, ruler and warrior of the Jewish people. She defeated the Canaanite King Jabin in the 12th Century BCE. There were twelve judges, one for each tribe of Israel. These tribes making up the Israeli people lived on the land.

          The Qu’ran recognized Israel, its tribes and people.

          “The Dinner Table

          [5.12] And certainly Allah made a covenant with the children of Israel, and We raised up among them twelve chieftains;”

          What was this covenant? God had given the land to the people of Israel.

          The covenant was first renewed with Moses. The Qu’ran surah “Elevated Places” states:

          “[7.134] And when the plague fell upon them, they said: O Moses! pray for us to your Lord as He has promised with you, if you remove the plague from us, we will certainly believe in you and we will certainly send away with you the children of Israel.

          [7.137] And We made the people who were deemed weak to inherit the eastern lands and the western ones which We had blessed; and the good word of your Lord was fulfilled in the children of Israel because they bore up (sufferings) patiently;”

          According to the Hebrew Bible the Lord God appeared in person to the prophet Samuel in the village of Shiloh. Samuel received God’s renewed Mosaic covenant with the Jewish people that the land of Israel was given to them. When Samuel traveled to Bethel it is said that the people trembled in awe. Here was the man to whom God spoke appeared in person, the God who gave the Jewish people Israel. Samuel was the anointed person to bridge the Israeli people of the judges era to the era of Nation state.

          Prophets Micah, Isaiah, Amos, Hosea, Jeremiah and other prophets lived in the land of Israel.

          Israel was the nation state of the Jewish people. It was never the nation state of an Arab people.

          Judea and Samaria contain massive archeological evidence of the connection of the religious and historical significance of Judea and Samaria to the Israeli people.

          Reply to Comment
          • Mike Panzone

            a very interesting account of biblical and ancient history…but has nothing to do with the current group of folks who currently reside on the plot of land called Susya.

            Reply to Comment
    2. Ben

      One of the ‘Justices’ who “held Susya did not exist” is himself an illegal squatter in the West Bank. He felt no need to recuse himself. Enough said. But we’ll append this as well:

      David Shulman:

      “Susya is a microcosm of the Israeli occupation, a lucid embodiment of its norms and habits. Only the scale of the planned expulsion is a little unusual; normally the process, though relentless, proceeds in smaller steps. Note that the legal aspect of the situation, which I’ve only outlined, is little more than a superstructure, one might even say a distant theory; on the ground what one sees is a refined form of human malevolence, incapable of justification in rational terms. The Israeli army, the police, the bureaucrats of the Civil Administration, the government, the cabinet, the Knesset, the military and civilian courts, and large parts of the Israeli press—all are deeply implicated in an act, or a series of acts, of gratuitous violence inflicted on innocent human beings, in broad daylight. No one should pretend that any of this is anything but a crime.”

      http://www.nybooks.com/blogs/nyrblog/2012/jun/28/susya-demolition-israeli-occupation/

      Reply to Comment
      • Pedro X

        “The Arabs never lived permanently in these caves… the caves have been used only as temporary dwellings by shepherds for two weeks to a month a year during the grazing season.”

        The Jerusalem Post on July 22, 2015 published the “The invention of the village of Susiya”. Here is part of the article which deals with the assertion that an Arab village of Susiya existed.

        “The High Court found that these assertions were demonstrably false, based on comprehensive objective historical and geographical accounts. Historical aerial photography, detailed mandatory maps, travelogues from the 18th and 19th centuries, and the population registry all established that their assertions were a fabrication. Fact: no such village ever existed. The High Court has ruled repeatedly against these false assertions (HC 7530/01, 430/12, 1556/12, 1420/14).

        However, the Nawajah family’s “struggle” has become a cause célèbre of the cadre of foreigners and foreign-funded NGOs intent on harming Israel and its standing worldwide through untruths, misrepresentations and outright lies.

        Second, apparently the State Department failed to realize that the High Court established that the Nawajah family members have permanent homes in Yata, a city in Area A, under full Palestinian Authority rule (HCJ 430/12 and HCJ 1556/12).

        Moreover, Regavim’s research has established that like other PA residents from Areas A & B, the Nawajah family are being encouraged by the PA in accordance with the Fayyad Plan (2009) and assisted by the EU (EU report “Area C and Palestinian State Building”– 2011) to illegally establish facts on the ground in Area C (under full Israeli authority, as per Oslo Accords).

        Regavim has documented at least 20 illegal structures in the encampment, funded directly by the EU and proudly bearing the EU flag. The encampment is strategically placed between the Jewish community of Susiya and the Susiya archaeological site. Their agenda is clearly intended to obliterate the fact that an ancient Jewish community, including a magnificent ancient synagogue, thrived in this area before Islam even existed.

        The fact is that the area occupied by the squatters has only served as grazing land. In 1982 Plia Albeck, the state’s land expert, documented some private land in the area and confirmed it as agricultural land only. Anthropologist Yaacov Havakook researched the area the 1980s when he lived there for several years. As an expert witness he stated: “The Arabs never lived permanently in these caves… the caves have been used only as temporary dwellings by shepherds for two weeks to a month a year during the grazing season.”

        Two days prior to the State Department statement, B’tselem, an NGO well-funded by the EU and foreign governments including France, the UK and Germany as well as by the New Israel Fund, published a press release saying that pressure from Regavim is forcing the government’s hand and quoting the illegal encampment’s counsel, saying “that this kind of thinly veiled threat to demolish homes in Susiya before the planned court hearing is an unacceptable form of coercion”.

        Reading this quote one would conclude that the hearing on August 3rd is intended to adjudicate the legality of the demolition orders. This is a deliberate attempt to mislead, and unfortunately, the US State Department was again apparently misled. In fact, the legality of the demolition orders has been confirmed by the High Court many times over the protracted litigation, and the High Court denied a request for an injunction against the orders despite the pending hearing: “Taking the law into one’s own hands even after filing this petition precludes granting an interim order.” (HCJ 1420/14)

        The State department also stated, “We urge Israeli authorities to work with the residents of the village to finalize a plan for the village that addresses the residents’ humanitarian needs.” The State department purposefully ignored the true state of affairs or was woefully ill informed in this regard as well. In fact, even though they have homes in Yatta, the Civil Administration had agreed to establish a new village in Area C, a mere 2 miles from their current illegal encampment, more than providing for their “humanitarian needs”.

        It is crucial that the facts be told and the law upheld despite the extreme pressure being applied by the EU and US State Department.The Israeli government dare not cede the rule of law in this blatant and misguided attempt to usurp the authority and power of our courts and legal system. If the government appears powerless in the face of pressure from such outside forces and continues to sacrifice the country’s interests, Israel will, indeed, invite additional pressure, while weakening its own resolve to pursue justice.”

        Reply to Comment
        • Ben

          Nothing “adjudicated” by the corrupt settler judges of a corrupt, belligerent, illegal occupier settles anything, Pedro X. The entire process is itself an arm of the occupation. The entire process is invalid. A small circle within a much larger circle of a Venn diagram. The inmates don’t get to run the asylum and the criminals don’t get to run the courtroom. As for the dreams of ancient kings and prophets that swim in your head and intoxicate you, with any intoxication there are limits and reality eventually intrudes with a hangover. And intoxication is not a legal defense against transgressions made while intoxicated. Your “side” is going to get 78% + 1-5%= 79-83% in a final end off conflict settlement and you’ll have as many tourist rights as Abu Mazen will have in Safed. The Palestinians will run plenty of nice B&Bs to cater to the trade I’m sure. And it’s such a short trip. What an interesting multicultural place it will be. It will be quite alright. Really. It won’t be so terrible. Life will go on. In time, almost everyone but a few zealots and nut jobs will feel better. Worship of stones is idolatry and not Jewish.

          Reply to Comment
    3. Gustav

      Evil Israel, evil Israel… blah, blah, blah…

      So long as Israel is in charge of the territories, Israeli laws shall prevail.

      Ya don’t like it? Then end it by signing a peace deal with Israel. The Palestinian Arabs would then be able to make their own decisions in the territories which they would end up with.

      Don’t wanna sign a peace deal coz ya would rather see no Israel at all? Then stop complaining about the status quo.

      Ya can’t have it both ways folks. We ain’t gonna disappear just to please anyone!

      Reply to Comment
      • Gustav

        The Oslo II Accord divided the West Bank into three administrative divisions: the Areas A, Band C. The distinct areas were given a different status, according to the amount of self-government the Palestinians would have over it through the Palestinian Authority, until a final status accord would be established.

        Area C (full Israeli civil and security control):

        …and what do you know? Susya is in area C. So even according the Oslo accord, it comes under Israeli civil control. Ergo, Israeli law prevails there. And what a surprise, Israeli law does not permit tent cities to spring up unilaterally.

        Wanna change that? Sign a peace deal with Israel. And under that peace deal, it would be up to the Palestinian Arabs to approve, or not approve tent cities which would spring up overnight by squatters, on territories under Palestinian Arab jurisdiction.

        Don’t wanna sign a peace deal coz ya would rather see Israel disappear? Well then, put up with Israeli laws. Coz we ain’t gonna disappear just to please anyone.

        Reply to Comment
      • Weiss

        No need…
        Satanyahoo’s re-election as the poster-boy of Israeli Apartheid and continued gross policy miscalculations in his zeal for total domination, is exponentially increasing the inevitability of the coming Palestinian State whether he likes it or not.

        Reply to Comment
        • Gustav

          Yeah that and the phase of the moon and 1001 Arabian nights…

          Why do the Palestinian Arabs sign accords and then try to pretend that the accords are only binding on Israel but not on them?

          No buildings without permits abd tent cities allowed under Israeli civilian administration. Which bit of that do the weisses of this world don’t understand?

          Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            “Satanyahoo”

            Nice touch, Weiss. You are not a hater and a demonizer, are you, Weiss?

            You know where you can shove your lie about Israeli apartheid? Up yours where the sun does not shine. There… I am a hater too. I hate vermin like you, Weiss!

            Reply to Comment
          • Weiss

            Vermin???

            WE Americans did not help to defeat the Fascist-Nazis for Israel to turn around and embrace the Far Right where Fascism lies.

            And ANY Jew who embraces the Far Right is desecrating the memory of every single Jewish victim of the Holocaust.

            This American JEW is ashamed of you Israel…

            The Fascists have tilted the political spectrum so far to the Right that the Left is now in the CENTER…

            … This is the real existential threat which is destroying Israel FROM WITHIN.

            Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            You are not really a Jew Weiss. You are only a token Jew (if even that) momentarily, for the purpose of knocking Israel.

            You may (or may not) have Jewish parents but either way, you are anything but Jewish. Arab, maybe. I could believe that judging by the amount of hatred that you exhibit towards the state of the Jewish people and because of your lies. But not Jewish.

            One can only be Jewish if they feel Jewish. How does one feel Jewish? One of two ways…

            1. By being a religious Jew.

            2. By feeling to be part of the Jewish people.

            And you Weiss don’t fit either 1. or 2. Your own words betray you. That is how I know. So stop lying Weiss. We are wise to your kind. Because you cannot put enough distance between yourself and the Jewish people.

            Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            Half of the world’s total Jewish population calls Israel our home and most of the rest of the Jews who don’t live here support Israel. Oh, some may criticize us about some things but they don’t perpetrate lies about us. Like your LIE about us being an apartheid state.

            Like I said Weiss, your parents may (or may not) be Jewish. Let’s pretend that they ARE. Even so, you sound to be the type of person who describe yourself as Jewish only when you spew hatred against the state of the Jewish people. You do that, to impress your non Jewish friends because you probably socialize with types who hate us. You want to show them that “this Jew” – little old you Weiss – is good enough to be their friend because you are a hater too, like THEM!

            You know the types of “Jews” who had the same attitude as you? The Kapos!

            Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            20% of Israel’s population, Israel within the green line, not the Westbank, are Arabs with full citizenship rights.

            Israel has anti discrimination laws to enforce minority rights. Israeli Arabs (as opposed to WB Arabs who are under occupation because they refuse to sign a peace deal) have the same rights as Jewish Israelis. They have the same benefits such as healthcare etc. they serve as high court judges they work as doctors in the same hospitals and they are elected into the Kneset. The only area where Jewish citizens have an extra benefit, is immigration. We won’t apologize about that because we want to keep Israel a Jewish majority state. That is the reason Israel was formed. To be a sanctuary where Jews will not be able to be oppressed as we were, yes we were oppressed in Arab states too for 2000 years because WE were in the minority.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            To me Weiss is clearly placing zero distance between himself and the Jewish people and that is one reason why he is so aggrieved in the heartfelt manner in which he expresses it. (You’ve got it backwards.) Weiss is nothing if not sincere. You should accept his viewpoint and not demonize and exile him from the tribe for it. “Token Jew” is pretty offensive. But the last thing I would think appropriate to hurl at Weiss of all people is a vaguely fascistic-nazeeish-feeling kind of epithet like “vermin.” Wow.

            http://www.jpost.com/Diaspora/Report-Diaspora-Jews-are-growing-increasingly-critical-of-Israel-410058

            JERUSALEM — Diaspora Jewry is increasingly critical of Israel and young Diaspora Jews are growing more alienated from the Jewish state, a new study found.

            The study, released this week by the Jewish People Policy Institute, an influential think tank based in Jerusalem, comes a year after Israel’s war in Gaza. Titled “Jewish Values and Israel’s Use of Force in Armed Conflict: Perspectives from World Jewry,” the report looks at how non-Israeli Jews view Israeli military actions and how Diaspora Jews should respond.

            Diaspora Jews tend to support and understand the military actions, the study found, but also “doubt that Israel truly wishes to reach a peace settlement with the Palestinians.” The study added that “few believe it is making the necessary effort to achieve one,” particularly among younger Jews….

            Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            BEN:”To me Weiss is clearly placing zero distance between himself and the Jewish people”

            Ok then Benny, let’s do the maths…

            Is Weiss a religious Jew? I highly doubt it. So there is plenty of distance there between Weiss and religious Jews…

            …is Weiss on the same wavelength as most Israeli Jews? Nah, obviously not…

            …is Weiss on the same wavelength as MOST diaspora Jews, about Israel? Nah, most diaspora Jews love and admire Israel…

            That takes care of the distance between Weiss and MOST secular Jews. The distance is an abyss…

            …is Weiss on the same wavelength as the enemies of Israel who would love to see Israel destroyed? Yep, Weiss is a hole in one on that score, he hates Israel. He lies about Israel and he demonizes us…

            So tell me Benny, which bit of Weiss is Jewish rather than Kapoish?

            Reply to Comment
          • Mike Panzone

            The shame Weiss has seems to be directed toward Israel’s people and their leadership. The prophets of old also were ashamed of israel and chastised it in much the same way, but it was because they loved Israel and were outraged at its citizens’ destructive policies.

            If israel today reversed its policies, Weiss would be proud again i’m sure.

            Reply to Comment
          • Mike Panzone

            “To me Weiss is clearly placing zero distance between himself and the Jewish people and that is one reason why he is so aggrieved in the heartfelt manner in which he expresses it.”

            yes i agree with you. as i posted above, when i hear jewish folks like Weiss react this way, it reminds me of the biblical prophets who angrily criticized, even cursed, ancient israel’s policies. it was because they loved israel that they spoke up, not because they hated it.

            those prophets weren’t received very well by the israelites either.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            Thanks for your contributions, Gustav. Among and between Michael Omer-Man, David Shulman, Mairav Zonszein (two recent articles on Susya), and the piece to which Michael links by Dror Etkes on High Court Justice Noam Sohlberg—a West Bank settler himself, who refused to recuse himself, and who refused to issue an injunction against the demolition even while the case is pending—a fine example of Israeli law “prevailing” as you say (law is an instrument of “prevailing” as opposed to justice, and justice in the context of equal protection of the laws? Oh.)…among all these, I say:

            We’ll just have to agree to disagree, and let others decide for themselves.

            By the way, you say that “Israeli law does not permit tent cities to spring up unilaterally.” Could you please point me to the relevant passages of Israeli law that permit trailers and shacks to spring up unilaterally? And is “tent” defined differently than “trailer” and “shack” in Israeli law? It’s an important thing to know. Because there are all sorts of trailers and shacks all over the West Bank that sprang up unilaterally and exist to this day and no one seems to have bothered to enforce the law against those unilateral trailers and shacks. I’ve scrutinized this and the only thing different about the tents versus the trailers and shacks seems to be that the former have Arabs inside of them and the latter have Jews inside of them. Oh wait, there is one more thing different. The trailers and shacks have running water and electricity supplied to them by the Israeli state but the tents don’t. Another puzzling fact of life in Area C of the West Bank governed by “Israeli law.” Tents, trailers and shacks. I dunno. It’s a mystery folks!

            Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            I’ll tell ya what, Benny…

            When I’ll see Arabs advocating that Jews and in particular, Israeli Jews, are human beings too and that we are not just there to be slaughtered in order to force pro Arab political solutions, that will be the moment when I will advocate that we too should treat Palestinian Arabs more leniently. In the meanwhile, there is a war going on between the two societies. A war which the Palestinian Arabs insist in pursuing and which has been going on for nearly the last 100 years, even before there was occupation and which we never wanted and which we would prefer not to have because we woud prefer peace.

            How do I know there is war? Because the Palestinian Arabs constantly refuse to sign a peace deal with us. And they keep on trying to murder our women and children. Sometimes they even succeed. So what do you expect from us towards them? Love and respect?

            Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            Let’s just look at some other wars too, shall we, Benny? For instance, WW2…

            You claim to be an American, right Benny? Did Americans treat citizens who immigrated to America from Germany, Japan and Italy equally to other citizens? Nah! A large number of those naturalized citizens were interned into camps. And unlike the West Bank Arabs who are not even Israeli citizens, those naturalized German, Japanese and Italian citizens were not treated as equals.

            But you Benny want us to treat the non citizen West Bank Arabs as equals to our citizens? Nah, Benny, nah, nobody in our place would do better than us. But many would do worse! We have seen it time and time again in history how even the most civilized societies treat those with whom they are in a state of war.

            Reply to Comment
    4. Electric Avenue

      Look at these photos!
      Activist TourIsm at its finest
      And what cynical use of children.

      Reply to Comment
    5. Ben

      I would like to know more about this man, Civil Administration officer Moshe Meiri. A quietly remarkable man if you ask me. ==>

      “The deed was problematic because the boundaries mentioned were unclear, described in terms of geographic features that turned out hard to identify on the ground. But Meiri managed to locate them and found that they indeed included land belonging to the Jabor family, as well as to the Nawaja family.” ==>

      Defense Ministry internal report: Palestinian land at Sussia is privately owned
      Civil Administration report obtained by Haaretz cites Ottoman deed, may halt planned demolitions in West Bank village.

      http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacy-defense/.premium-1.667817

      “Sussia, the Palestinian village in which structures are slated for demolition, sits on private Palestinian land owned by local people, according to a document of the Defense Ministry’s Civil Administration obtained by Haaretz.

      Despite the findings by Civil Administration officer Moshe Meiri, Sussia residents still need building permits in order to prevent the planned demolition. Meiri’s report, however, appears to counter the reasoning that building permits cannot be issued to the local people because of a lack of ownership papers.

      It appears that the Sussia residents cannot be forced to leave Sussia because the village is built on private land. Even if structures there are demolished, village residents could use the land for agricultural purposes.

      The Palestinians could build structures under the master expansion plan that allows for basic structures for agriculture. Structures currently on the ground could be altered to fit this plan.

      Despite the findings by Civil Administration officer Moshe Meiri, Sussia residents still need building permits in order to prevent the planned demolition. Meiri’s report, however, appears to counter the reasoning that building permits cannot be issued to the local people because of a lack of ownership papers

      It appears that the Sussia residents cannot be forced to leave Sussia because the village is built on private land. Even if structures there are demolished, village residents could use the land for agricultural purposes.

      The Palestinians could build structures under the master expansion plan that allows for basic structures for agriculture. Structures currently on the ground could be altered to fit this plan.

      The internal document was drawn up following an inquiry by the Jabor family, which bases a claim to land near Sussia on Ottoman documents from 1881. In recent years, the Civil Administration has demolished Jabor-family tents and trees a number of times.

      The family filed an appeal with the help of attorney Jad Nasser and claimed ownership of the land.

      According to Meiri, a Civil Administration officer responsible for land administration in the West Bank, the Ottoman deed is indeed valid. The same type of deed has also been mentioned by the State Prosecutor’s Office, which has ruled on the borders of various settlements.

      The deed was problematic because the boundaries mentioned were unclear, described in terms of geographic features that turned out hard to identify on the ground. But Meiri managed to locate them and found that they indeed included land belonging to the Jabor family, as well as to the Nawaja family.

      At the end of ruling, Meiri wrote that the orders issued to the Jabor family should be canceled and that previous court rulings on Sussia should be discussed. Meiri’s ruling came as a surprise to the Civil Administration, especially the head of the Coordinator for Government Activities in the Territories, who had personally intervened in the Sussia matter. The wider ramifications of Meiri’s findings are still being considered….”

      Reply to Comment
      • Gustav

        Note the difference in approach, folks…

        ME: As per the Oslo accords, Israeli civil law applies and I left it at that.

        BEN INITIALLY: How dare Israel attempt to demolish the tents.

        BEN SUBSEQUENTLY: After he reads that an Israeli judge may rule in the villagers favor, begins to cheer Israeli civil law.

        TRANSLATION: Benny has a closed mind.

        Reply to Comment
        • Ben

          “With more or less the entire Western world warning Israel not to demolish the Palestinian village of Susya and forcefully displace its residents, it is no surprise that the Israeli army might be seeking a way to climb down the tree it is stuck on.
          So how does one announce that it might not demolish that village which it has been claiming for years has no right to exist? As a first step, you might look for an internal document you discarded years ago, one that argues the residents of Susya do actually own the land from which you want to expel them, and then leak it to the press.”

          http://972mag.com/has-the-idf-found-a-way-to-climb-down-the-susya-tree/109302/

          Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            Really? There are other things that the Western world warn us about. Are we climbing down on those?

            Nah. But according to Benny, every act that Israel does is evil. We are incapable of doing anything that he considers to be good off our own accord. Conversely, in his eyes, the Palestinian Arabs can do no wrong. Even if they get caught red handed doing wrong things, according to Benny, it is never their fault. Often he says, Israel made them do it…

            Yep, Benny has a biased and a closed mind.

            Reply to Comment
          • Gustav

            Interesting though, read this…

            https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Susya

            “The excavated synagogue in Susya dates from the 4th to the 7th century CE and was in continuous use until the 9th century CE.[12][13] It is one of four of an architecturally unique group in the Southern Judean Hills”

            I guess the activists will never talk about this or it’s ramifications.

            Just sayin’

            Reply to Comment
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+972 is an independent, blog-based web magazine. It was launched in August 2010, resulting from a merger of a number of popular English-language blogs dealing with life and politics in Israel and Palestine.

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