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Silencing our mosques is the next stage in our dispossession

Moti Yogev’s ‘muezzin law’ is yet another step toward creating a public atmosphere that could lead to expelling Arabs from Israel.

By Abed Abu Shehadeh

Muslim men pray inside a mosque in the northern city of Acre, March 3, 2015. (Marcelo Sus/Flash90)

Muslim men pray inside a mosque in the northern city of Acre, March 3, 2015. (Marcelo Sus/Flash90)

As it does every year, the sounds of the muezzin reached the Knesset this past week. Last time it was Yisrael Beiteinu’s Anastasia Michaeli who brought the “muezzin law” before the Knesset; this time it was MK Moti Yogev (Jewish Home). The dangerous bill, which was approved by the Ministerial Committee for Legislation, leaves little room for the imagination: “Houses of worship will be forbidden from using loudspeakers to call the worshippers to prayer or to transmit religious, national or sometimes inciting messages.” Yogev is the same member of Knesset who cares so much about the public interest that he previously proposed bulldozing Israel’s High Court of Justice. After all, why would the public need to defend itself from the tyranny of the regime once Yogev’s Jewish Home party gets into power?

Cynicism aside, time and again we have heard these kinds of remarks by Jewish Home MKs, and each time we have been astounded by the degree of ignorance and cruelty that has come to characterize the party: from Bezalel Smotrich, who does not believe a single Arab passed the psychometric entrance exams, to Education Minister Naftali Bennett, who gloated about killing Arabs during his military career.

Regardless of the ease with which we automatically pay attention to their comments, this law could not have even been proposed in the first place had it not received widespread public support, as part of a continuing attempt by Jewish Israeli society to mold the public sphere in its image. Or as Yogev put it: for the sake of “the quality of life of the state’s citizens” (as a military man, Yogev must know that should the bill pass, there would be massive demonstrations across the country that could actually harm the public’s “quality of life”). Therefore, it is clear to all that the main impetus for such a law is the feeling of supremacy of Israel’s Jewish citizens, such that the only their religious symbols are acceptable.

What is astounding to Arab society about this public discussion is not that we were caught off guard, but rather that the entire is issue is foreign to us: in Jaffa, especially in the Arab neighborhoods, there exists an Arab social fabric that includes both Christians and Muslims. Never did we imagine Jaffa without the muezzin or church bells. In our view, calls to prayer and church bells are apolitical — they are an integral part of our identity and the identity of our city.

The first time this ever became an issue was when wealthier Israeli Jews began moving into Arab neighborhoods. That was when we were shocked to discover that our new neighbors, who passed by the mosques and churches — the ones who knew to pay lip service to coexistence and multiculturalism — are full of complaints about these houses of worship, all while entirely ignoring the religious sensibilities of its older residents. Jewish Israelis view the gentrification of these neighborhoods as a positive development, without understanding how invasive the process actually is.

The occupier’s gaze is at the base of Israeli society. We can write books and articles providing religious and cultural justifications for the muezzin — but to the ears of the occupiers, doing so will always be viewed as an acts of uprising. They will hear the muezzin and believe in all their hearts that it is inciting against them in the language they were taught to hate. The soldiers among them will be reminded of their service in the occupied territories; they won’t get used to the dissonance, and justifiably so: their world is divided between occupied and occupier, and the Palestinians in Israel subvert this logic. In practice, this behavior, which is translated into the muezzin law, is intended to force us to change our customs so that they have an easier time defining their public space. This is another step toward creating a public atmosphere that could lead to expelling the Arabs of this country.

If this is true, I do not accept the claim that the Israeli Right is the sole driver of this law. This is the Israeli consensus, which is built on cooperation of the Left and the Right — when both sides are driven by racist motives under the guise of “quality of life.” Should the bill pass, we will bare witness to a situation in which Israeli Police step inside mosques to take apart their PA systems. This will only bring about harsh, unanticipated reactions — leading to a new era in relations between Arabs and Jews.

Abed Abu Shehadeh is a Balad Party member and a student at the School of Government and Society of Tel Aviv-Yaffo Academic College. This article was first published in Hebrew on Haokets.

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    COMMENTS

    1. Bernie X

      Why not bring back the old fashioned muezzin?
      More soulful, without a PA system. No?

      Reply to Comment
      • Where’s the resistance in that?

        Reply to Comment
    2. Train981

      So, where in the Koran or Hadith does it say that the muezzin must use a loudspeaker during the adhan?

      Jaffa will still have the muezzin and the church bells, just without the obnoxious habit of each mosque trying to outdo the other with louder and louder loudspeakers.

      Good neighbors don’t wake their neighbors up at 5 in the morning by blasting through loudspeakers such obvious lies as “Prayer is better than sleep”.

      Reply to Comment
    3. carmen

      “Good neighbors don’t wake their neighbors up at 5 in the morning by blasting through loudspeakers such obvious lies as “Prayer is better than sleep”.

      Smart neighbors close their windows. I enjoy the muezzin’s call to prayer as I’m sure a lot of people do or you get used to it and tune it out. It doesn’t affect your life.

      What I find annoying and unnecessary is the siren heralding shabbat and the traffic-stopping sirens on jewish holidays – this is ridiculous. Also ridiculous, but not the point here, sorry, is the lack of public transportation on shabbat. It’s a joke! The streets are full of cars as are the roads on shabbat, but not buses or trains? This is one of the hallmarks of this ethnoreligious ‘state’. There are millions of people here who are not jewish but the jewish religion invades their personal space chol hazman.

      And the second official language of the zionist state is, wait for it……arabic! It’s high past the time for arabic to stop being feared and used to incite hatred, but to be studied and taught in public schools from gan through university.

      Reply to Comment
      • Train981

        Good neighbors don’t force their neighbors to close their windows because they insist on blasting music at the wee hours of the morning. It is an invasion of my personal space on a daily basis. I don’t see how you can be annoyed by the once-a-week shabbat siren but not the adhan that is played 5 times a day. Both annoy me.

        I agree on public transportation on Shabbat and it doesn’t matter if people are Jewish or not. No one is forced to take public transportation on Shabbat, but people are prevented from having the option to do so on the basis of religious law.

        As for Arabic, it is a useless language to learn in Israel. I have tried learning it (both written and spoken) and it is just a massively huge waste of time. Even if a Hebrew speaker spends years learning Arabic the Israeli Arabs will still speak Hebrew better and the conversations will take place in Hebrew. It is also completely useless for job prospects (unless you are a doctor or nurse or work for the shabak). On absolutely all grounds a young person is better off learning English or some other foreign language.

        Reply to Comment
        • Carmen

          If you practice your faith, you’re aware of its rituals, holy ‘times’ and the like, without the assistance/enforcement of sirens, PA systems or whatever. I think on this I can agree.

          “The occupier’s gaze is at the base of Israeli society. We can write books and articles providing religious and cultural justifications for the muezzin — but to the ears of the occupiers, doing so will always be viewed as an acts of uprising. They will hear the muezzin and believe in all their hearts that it is inciting against them in the language they were taught to hate. The soldiers among them will be reminded of their service in the occupied territories; they won’t get used to the dissonance, and justifiably so: their world is divided between occupied and occupier, and the Palestinians in Israel subvert this logic. In practice, this behavior, which is translated into the muezzin law, is intended to force us to change our customs so that they have an easier time defining their public space. This is another step toward creating a public atmosphere that could lead to expelling the Arabs of this country.”

          I get it that arabic isn’t an easy language to learn, but it’s an official language that has been usurped by russian and english. The stories of Palestinians being told not to speak arabic at work, and people being afraid to speak their language, which is again an official language – not a foreign one – in public is disgraceful. the GoI behaves as though speaking arabic is an act of terrorism.

          Reply to Comment
          • OneEightNine

            Arabic being an official language isn’t a great reason to force a lot of people to waste their time to learn it while pretty much everyone speaks Hebrew at a reasonable level and English is a far more useful additional language for everyone to learn. The current reality is that Hebrew and English are the predominant languages of Israel. Perhaps it is time for the law to catch up.

            Weird. I hear Arabic spoken quite a bit between employees when I am shopping in stores. None of them seem to be remotely frightened to speak it or scream it as the case may be.

            Reply to Comment
        • In Belgium English is the neutral lingua franca between the Dutch and French communities. AT this point in time it is by far the most useful language to learn, especially for interactions with other non-native speakers.

          Putting aside questions of local dialect, Arabic spans massive world, but it is a world which few Israeli passport holders are unlikely to enter. The disincentive is massive.

          I would say it’s useful to know the script and numerals so you can read signs. For example, getting on the right bus.

          Reply to Comment
    4. Tommy Goldberg

      Well, I love the (non-amplified) sound of church bells in Europe, but I hate the noise many American churches blare from their steeples using electronic PA systems. So if Israel were to ban ALL “artificial” sounds advertising religious practice, I might even get on board.

      BUT if you want to keep the Shabbat siren, you’ll have to keep the amplified call to prayer. Simple as that.

      Reply to Comment
    5. Itshak Gordin Halevy

      We are in a Jewish country. The siren of the Chabat lasts one minute one time a week. The calls of the muezzin deafen us seven days a week and five times a day. Minorities have to submit themselves to the majority just like the Jews did it in Arab countries before being chased away.

      Reply to Comment
      • Carmen

        They did it to us so we can do it to them is the rationalization of a child.

        Reply to Comment
        • Itshak Gordin Halevy

          Yes, absolutely. It is human nature and we are not different from others…

          Reply to Comment
          • Carmen

            “Yes, absolutely. It is human nature and we are not different from others…”

            Most definitely. Yet we treat those others we are no different from, very differently, don’t we? Different roads, schools, neighborhoods, laws, health care, standard of living, access to family and friends, etc.

            Reply to Comment
    6. carmen

      that 189 moniker is awfully popular here. I hear arabic out and about also, but there are stories like the ones below maybe you haven’t heard.

      Arabs in Jerusalem Fear Attacks, Are Scared To Speak Arabic – Vocativ
      http://www.vocativ.com/240359/arabs-jerusalem-fear-attacks

      Israel’s war on the Arabic language – AJE News – Al Jazeera
      http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/…/israel-war-arabic-language-160404102325547.html

      Tel Aviv University tells call center workers not to speak Arabic – Israel …
      http://www.haaretz.com › Israel News

      Haifa cafe tells workers to stop speaking Arabic around Jewish …
      http://www.jpost.com/Arab…/Haifa-cafe-tells-workers-to-stop-speaking-Arabic-around-Jewi...

      Arabic speaking Palestinian-American told to keep off plane after …
      http://www.jpost.com/…/Arabic-speaking-Palestinian-American-told-to-keep-off-plane-after

      Reply to Comment
      • Ferry819

        Hmm. One article talks about a customer that thought the Arab store staff were making fun of him in Arabic. To me that sounds like bad customer service.

        Another article is about a Southwest airlines flight between Chicago and Philadelphia. I fail to see how that demonstrate anything about the status of Arabic in Israel.

        Another article is about Arabs being afraid during the height of the stabbing attacks last year. Tough. When young Arabs are walking around randomly stabbing Jews it is reasonable to expect that Jews will be on their guard and that would make Arabs afraid.

        Another article is about how in Tel Aviv University they expect their staff to speak Hebrew with students to ensure that they all get the same information.

        And another one from Al Jazeera. The link doesn’t work anyway.

        So far the idea that people are afraid to speak Arabic seems rather unreasonable to me. I hear it way too often for that to be true and none of your articles have convinced me any differently.

        And I use various variations of 189 because this site has some weird bug where my replies are often prevented from being submitted and I see an error. Or I am being censored.

        Reply to Comment
        • carmen

          “So far the idea that people are afraid to speak Arabic seems rather unreasonable to me. I hear it way too often for that to be true and none of your articles have convinced me any differently.”

          Aw, I was sure you’d be different. 🙂

          As far as your creating different versions ti get posted, maybe email +972 and see what they recommend?

          Reply to Comment
        • carmen

          “Another article is about Arabs being afraid during the height of the stabbing attacks last year. Tough. When young Arabs are walking around randomly stabbing Jews it is reasonable to expect that Jews will be on their guard and that would make Arabs afraid.”

          Tough? If arabic is the only language one knows? Funny you’d ‘understand’ that link but not the others. empathy is in short supply among the chosen people.

          Reply to Comment
          • Carmen

            “Another article is about Arabs being afraid during the height of the stabbing attacks last year. Tough. When young Arabs are walking around randomly stabbing Jews it is reasonable to expect that Jews will be on their guard and that would make Arabs afraid.”

            When young Palestinians are walking around going to work, home, school or to hang out with friends, it’s reasonable to expect that they will be on their guard when they hear Hebrew and will be afraid, especially knowing that jews can hurt them or kill them with impunity and suffer no consequences.

            Reply to Comment
    7. Itshak Gordin Halevy

      Carmen, why do you forget that thousands and thousands of Arabs enter every day in Israel to work? Have you seen all these Arabs happy to walk in the center of Jerusalem or in Israeli moles? Why don’t you mention all the Arabs studying in our universities and academies? On the other hands it is forbidden to Jews to visit Arab towns and villages in our Judea and Samaria.. It is forbidden to the Jews to pray on the Temple mount? Muslims do it every day. Double standards…

      Reply to Comment
      • Carmen

        Itshak,
        C’mon, you’re not even trying. You can’t turn the occupation into a magical place where palestinians work, study, pray and everyone is happy, happy, happy. Yes, they work, the ones that are israeli citizens don’t spend hours at checkpoints (unless visiting family or friends in the territories), they go to school, for now, in an atmosphere of suspicion and fear. Why don’t YOU talk about that? As far as haram al-sharif, the temple mount, the noble sanctuary – these sites should be protected by an international body, not jewish, not muslim, but the u.n. and al-quds, jerusalem, should be a protected city, with rights and privileges to all.

        Reply to Comment
        • Itshak Gordin Halevy

          Dear Carmen,
          If they prefer the Arab paradises to Israeli hell, they are free to leave in their own good time. We do not intend to share our Jewish land and our holy places. When Rome and Mecca will be under the protection of the UN we can begin to think of it.

          Reply to Comment
          • Carmen

            Itshak – you have the same problem as “AJew”. You don’t represent anyone. The world is against this occupation. I don’t believe the torah meant for people like the ones in all the illegal settlements to inherit anything. They’re nothing but trailer trash, losers from across the pond who came to palestine to kill with impunity and face no consequences. That isn’t a godly man or woman but a son or daughter of the devil.

            Reply to Comment
          • Itshak Gordin Halevy

            Carmen, do you really live in Israel? Of what thinks the world has no importance for a vast majority of Israeli (except perhaps for the leftist, but some of them begin to leave Israel for Berlin..). Please study the Torah and the Jewish holy books. You will understand why for most of the inhabitants of our country the protection of the historical, national and religious heritage of the Jewish people is much more important than the interests of the so-called “Palestinian people”.

            Reply to Comment
          • carmen

            Most of the jewish inhabitants of palestine don’t believe in anything but themselves so the ‘holy books’ aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on. Religion is a lie. We are all God’s creation, no? We were created in God’s image, no? So to hate each other is an abomination, right? To do unto the other what you would not want done to you is easy to remember. We’re all the same in God’s eyes. that’s it for ‘religion’. I actually do live in ‘israel’, can you say the same? (No response is necessary.)

            Reply to Comment
          • AJew

            “So to hate each other is an abomination, right?”

            Right.

            So why do you hate Jews? Why don’t you think that of all of God’s people Jews are the only people who don’t deserve our own nation state? While your people, Carmen, the Arab people already have 22 Arab states. Are the Arabs the chosen people of God, Carmen?

            Reply to Comment
          • Itshak Gordin Halevy

            “Palestine”? What is this? The name the Romans gave to the occupied Jewish territories hundreds of years ago… It seems that you are living in a fantasy world (as most of the Leftists). Your impressions about the Judaism show your total ignorance (innocence?). Even if you are not Jewish please study the Torah to make you an idea. For your information, I am an Israeli coming from Switzerland. I live in Maale Adoumim with my sons and grand children..

            Reply to Comment
          • Carmen

            I don’t mind being called ignorant of the jewish supremacist Guide for the Apoplectic. You can call me anything but a zionist or a ‘religious’ jew. 🙂 I was pretty sure you lived in Palestine, but didn’t want to assume. Uf Widerluege Ciao Tschüss Itshak 🙂

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            ​Classic settler narcissism, religious variant. But Itshak is more honest and consistent than most. Just quote the man:

            “I come from a Levi family who served in the Holy Temple of Jerusalem thousands of years ago and my sons or grandsons will probably serve in the third Temple I am in my homeland and I will take no lessons from anybody.”

            Oooh kaay, Itshak, that’s a basis for a reasonable conversation. The truth is though no more reasonable conversation can be had with the secular version of Itshak on this page.

            “It is here we can see the essence of contemporary Israeli Zionism in its purest form. Originally intended to create a safe haven for Jews who were persecuted for being Jewish, the Zionist project has instead turned into an enterprise of land theft and dispossession, the sole purpose of which is to remove the indigenous people from the land and to “Judaize” it. From Rehavam “Gandhi” Ze’evi’s transfer plan to Avigdor Liberman’s land-swap plan to Nobel Laureate Shimon Peres’s plan to Judaize the Galilee, the “formalization law” and dozens of other racist and discriminatory laws, the primary manifestation of the Israeli Zionist project today is the removal of the Palestinians from this land: physically, culturally, and nationally.”
            http://972mag.com/from-umm-el-hiran-the-future-of-zionism-looks-bleak/123298/

            Reply to Comment
          • AJew

            “Originally intended to create a safe haven for Jews who were persecuted for being Jewish, the Zionist project has instead turned into an enterprise of land theft”

            Here we see the essence of contemporary anti Zionist propaganda.

            Ben conveniently forgets bits of history and uses selective history to rephrase what actually happened (“land theft” he calls it).

            Ben forgets to mention that the Arabs were the ones who rejected the proposed UN partition of Palestine and attacked the Jews of Palestine and solemnly promised to wipe the Jews out. Does anyone doubt what would have happened to the Jews of Palestine had the Arabs been victorious in the war of 1947/48? Yea of course, the Ben’s of this world would have you believe that the Arabs would have created a model of democracy in which Jews and Arabs would have lived in kumbayah as equals. But then again, the Ben’s of this world would have one believe in flying pigs and pink elephants.

            Of course, as it happened, the Arabs lost the war which they started and in the process, as in all wars, many of them fled and became refugees (and yes, a smaller number were expelled because their villages were located in militarily strategic locations). So after having lost the war, the war which they wanted, the Arabs gave out a mighty cry and said: “we wuz robbed. The jooos robbed us. They stole our lands. Restore everything to the way it wuz before or we will whine forever about land theft”. But is that what happens after every war? Is everything restored to what it used to be before the war? So maybe the aggressors would be able to start another war? Is that what happened after WWII? Or after the war between India and Pakistan? Or after the now lesser known war between Turkey and Greece (at the onset of the 20th century)? Nah. Nothing doing. In the case of Germany and Japan, parts their lands were confiscated. In the cases of India, Pakistan, Greece and Turkey, the refugees of none of those countries were allowed to return to their homes. And they never called those as land thefts. They called it land swaps. Much as what it should be called in the conflict between Israel and the Arabs which had up to 1 million Jewish refugees from Arab countries too. Not just Arab refugees from Palestine. But you’ll never hear the Ben’s of this world mention Jewish refugees. Much less whine about Jewish refugees. Why? Because to Ben, Jews are just Jews. They are not as worthy or as precious as Arabs. Nuff said.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            In the first place, I’m quoting Orly Noy. I didn’t write the words you and I quote. Though I agree with them. So you can’t just chalk it up to an outside “hater” who does not have an on-the-ground Israeli perspective or whatever, or just chalk it up to “the perfidy of the nefarious Bennies of the world.”

            Secondly, I don’t “forget to mention” anything. I don’t mention irrelevant things, base on special pleading and a warped pseudo-historical calculus that says “we say they did this, let’s go fuzzy on what we did, but what they did, as we see it, you see, now entitles us to take the land as a price exacted and to hell with the human beings involved.” (And yet you don’t act like people who bought something you act like the Corleones.) Your portrayal of both history and current positions is of course extremely contentious at best, contrived. And it is unworkable. We’ve been over this.

            “…Germany, Japan….” These utterly juvenile examples. I will not revisit this tiresome nonsense we retired 39,000 posts ago. Never mind the blatant historical differences, by your internal “logic” the Americans ought to have said to the Japanese in 1945: “You bombed Pearl Harbor so we are entitled to take Tochigi, Gunma, Saitama, Chiba, Kanagawa, Yamanashi, Nagano, Gifu, Shizuoka, Aichi, and Tōkyō prefectures. We’re going to annex them, transfer our population into them and settle them. We’ll negotiate the other 36 prefectures, if you’re good about it.” Of course that didn’t happen. You admire Americans, claim to be America’s staunchest ally, no daylight, blah blah blah, but you don’t think and act like Americans at all.

            Reply to Comment
          • AJew

            “You don’t act like Americans at all”

            You are right about that. We are not Americans. Nor are we a super power. Nor are the threats we face the same as the threats that Americans face. Nor are our circumstances the same.

            Nevertheless, we don’t feel that we are any worse than Americans or anyone else for that matter. Maybe not better either, but not worse. We react to our own circumstances our own way.

            As for the land theft claim, I stand by what I said. At the end of WW2 lands were confiscated both from Japan and Germany. Mentioning that fact is not childish. It is relevant history.

            You don’t want to debate that anymore? That’s ok with me but your dismissal of it or trying to pretend that it was somehow more appropriate, does not make those facts irrelevant.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            Yeah we know, the Americans settled their own into Schleswig-Holstein. Gustav, the groundbreaking Benny Morris of the American occupation of Germany. A new historian. Reeaaaaally new.

            Reply to Comment
          • AJew

            Whatever Ben. I am certainly not here to bad mouth America but suffice it to say that like in ALL wars and ALL people, America too did things that many Americans are not proud today. As did we in our wars. Because wars bring out the worst in all of us. Even out of your “angelic Palestinian Arab victims”. The only difference though between us and you the Palestinian Arabs, Ben, is that we are happy to sign a peace deal based on MUTUAL RECOGNITION, but you and your people, Ben still refuse to recognise our very existence as a Jewish nation state. And so long as you refuse, you’ll get nothing from us.

            Have a nice day Ben.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ben

            ​”in ALL wars and ALL people, America too did things that many Americans are not proud today”

            The fallacious premise here of course is that a 50-year, meticulously calculated, methodical, painstaking and patiently executed occupation and creeping annexation against a vastly overpowered indigenous population is something like the equivalent of an urgent and extreme “war” situation, and the routine brutal behavior of the Kfir Brigade (it is a routine) in the West Bank is explainable by the same standards as applied to the U.S. 7th Armored Division during the Battle of the Bulge or the U.S. Marines in the Battle for Guadalcanal. Go watch Terrence Malick’s “The Thin Red Line.” Go watch Yehuda Shaul here:
            Yehuda Shaul – Breaking the Silence – Seattle, Nov 14, 2013
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxHE4KrLvj0

            Reply to Comment
          • AJew

            Well Ben, for 50 years, your people, the Palestinian Arabs have refused to sign a peace deal with us and have been murdering ourcivilians. So bad things happen to them too. You guys know what you have to do to end this. Recognise that we the Jewish people are an ethnic group too like you the Arab people. Therefore we too deserve our own state. Hey it is only fair. After all you the Arabs have 22 states already. Why do you then begrudge us just one state of our own?

            Reply to Comment
          • AJew

            Really? I am pleased for you Benny. You appear to be your own best fan.

            Reply to Comment
    8. i_like_ike52

      None of this has anything to do with “freedom of religion”. I heard that many Musilm countries, including IRAN, have restrictions on the noise levels emanating from mosques. The whole Arab protest is POLITICAL, and blasting out the call from the mosques is a pathetic attempt to show who is “boss” in this country and to make up for the humiliation for all the defeats in the wars the Arabs suffered at the hands of Israel. Let’s all be honest about it!

      Reply to Comment
      • Ben

        Of course it is political. Why wouldn’t it be? This lecture on politics comes from a champion of a state that makes everything–religious, archeological, geological, geographical, historical, and anthropological–political. It’s a bit rich. As for the cheap, condescending, hostile psychoanalytic interpretation, these things always have the amusing characteristic that the opposite interpretations are equally true:

        (A) The whole Jewish protest is POLITICAL, and forcibly removing Arabs from their homes so that Jews too pure to live near Arab neighbors won’t feel soiled fulfills a pathetic anal-retentive obsessive-compulsive obsession with purity as well as a pathetic reaction formation attempting to show who is “boss” in this country and to make up for the humiliation for all the mistreatment by the goyim in centuries past….blah blah blah.

        (B) The whole Arab protest is POLITICAL, and blasting out the call from the mosques is an effective attempt to show us that “we are here, always have been, even though you would like to pretend we are not, and we won’t be silenced.”

        You like that psychoanalysis? I didn’t think so. Your own narcissistic medicine doesn’t go down so well? Hmmmm. How about that.

        Reply to Comment
    9. “As far as haram al-sharif, the temple mount, the noble sanctuary – these sites should be protected by an international body, not jewish, not muslim, but the u.n. and al-quds, jerusalem, should be a protected city, with rights and privileges to all.”

      Do you seriously think that is on the cards for the waqf? Would an international body really uphold the ban on Jews praying on Temple Mount, given its discriminatory nature?

      Reply to Comment
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