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WATCH: Egyptian journalist urges Israelis in Hebrew: Stand up to 'Bibi and Lapid'

Israel’s Channel 10 news anchor Guy Zohar interviewed Egyptian journalist and political activist Heba Abo Seif live from Tahrir Square on Tuesday. Abu Saif, who spoke excellent Hebrew, assured Zohar that the military stands behind the Egyptian nation, and urged the Israeli people to stand up to their own government. She specifically references “Bibi and Lapid,” saying that Israelis should not remain silent if they are not getting what they were promised. She also said that Egypt “will never be Syria,” referencing the unity between Egyptian nation and the military.

Here is the video interview, translated in full (Note it only lasts 3 minutes but the Youtube video goes on):


The news anchor of course played up the “anti-Israel” card by asking her about whether she is scared to speak Hebrew right there in Tahrir. But the much more important and relevant question I would have wanted her to answer is whether she is scared, as a woman, to be in Tahrir, considering reports of sexual assault of women there – and specifically the report about a Dutch journalist gang-raped and hospitalized last Friday.

According to a comprehensive 2013 UN report, 99.3 percent of Egyptian women say they were subjected to one form or another of sexual harassment, 91.5 percent of which involved being physically touched and 30-60 percent included rape.

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  • COMMENTS

    1. XYZ

      While I don’t like Mursi and his Muslim Brotherhood friends, he was elected in a constitutional manner to the presidency. While, of course, it is legitimate to have demonstrations against the gov’t in a democracy (if that indeed is what Egypt is), to have what is esssentially “mob rule” by demanding that a legally elected gov’t be ousted in a non-constituional manner is a recipe for chaos and anarchy, because any future gov’t can be paralyzed by fear of what the opposition can do.
      This is the same kind of thing that lead to Latin America having military dictatorships for decades using the claim that the elected gov’t was “corrupt”.

      I don’t know why she is telling us what to do here in Israel….we have a democratically elected gov’t which is supported by a clear majority.

      Reply to Comment
      • Abed

        You have to realize the legitimacy of Egyptian democracy is days old. Democratic society takes decades to solidify. Progress will be slow, but at least it will be something. Mursi was elected to do a job. Certain promises were made. He sought out policy decisions and prioritized the wrong things. The people have decided mistakes were made and are moving quickly to alter their course. The right to revolution is a reflection of democracy in action. Try it anywhere else and you’ll be put down by your own government.

        Reply to Comment
    2. Ibnab

      I’m not surprised. I’m arab, of muslim background, from North Africa and I learnt Hebrew. Many arabs are really curious about the state of Israel and about the Israeli society.

      Reply to Comment
      • XYZ

        I read some time ago about two Israeli Jews who run blogs in Arabic about Israel, Jews and Judaism and they both report a lot of interest in these subjects by Arabs. This is not surprising because in societies that emphasize conformism, there are always going to be those that want to open their minds and look at the other, forbidden, side.

        Reply to Comment
        • Gearoid

          Wow. What nice casual racism there.

          Ever think perhaps you should not act like a condescending racist to people that are not hostile to you?

          Reply to Comment
          • XYZ

            Please correct me if I am wrong, but it seems to me that the “progressive” definition of “racism” that you are employing here is to say that not everyone in the world thinks like you do and that there are differences between different cultures in their values and priorities.
            Thus, according to this, it is “racism” to say that Arab countries are different than Europeans, Americans or Israelis.
            Correct?

            Reply to Comment
          • Shmuel

            Sad how casually one gets smeared with the term racist when one is seen to be a Zionist.

            I actually think the accusers are the ones who are racists.

            There, I said it, I dared to say it. Now Gear will call me racist too.

            :)

            Reply to Comment
          • NIZ

            “This is not surprising because in societies that emphasize conformism, there are always going to be those that want to open their minds and look at the other, forbidden, side”

            Yes XYZ, I hope you could join those enlightened israelis.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ibnab

            @Gearoid:
            I don’t agree with the opinion of XYZ but how could it be racist?
            @ XYZ:
            I think there is much more individualism and anti conformism in Arab societies than you could imagine. Some Arab sectors (urban and educated) are as critical minded toward their own societies as the israeli writers of 972.

            Reply to Comment
      • Charles-Jerusalem

        To Ibnab,
        Good to know that a number of arabs from the magreb are interested in the Israeli culture (language, civilisation,…).
        I see around me a lot of jews interested in the arab culture and curious about it.
        I dont know perhaps is there a chance there to create a connection, a bridge to build between us based on the desire to fullfill this mutual curiosity.
        A jordanian friend of mine told me 2 weeks ago:”I have noticed the funniest thing in Jerusalem, the jews go to buy in arab shops and the arabs go to buy in jewish shops”, perhaps in the mutual secret desire to do something to create contact with each other and stop this stupid war one day!

        Reply to Comment
        • Ibnab

          It’s very difficult to create a real connection with israelis. Israelis are not allowed to visit the country and we are forbidden by our own government to visit Israel.

          Reply to Comment
          • Ibnab

            from visiting*

            Reply to Comment
    3. When I click on the video, it says “This video is private.”

      Reply to Comment
    4. Lisa K

      Cannot watch the video because it is set to “private” ?!

      Reply to Comment
    5. BadExampleMan

      Next up: she delivers the same message, in perfect English, to Americans about Obama.

      Reply to Comment
    6. It’s OK now. I agree with you, Mairav, her hebrew is beautiful. I wish mine was that good!

      Reply to Comment
    7. dino

      Also channel 2 and channel 1 had activists from Tahrir speaking fluent Hebrew in their news.Paralel with Tahrir demonstration took place an other of Muslims brothers but there were not activist speaking Hebrew to to be asked about in the TV news.By coincidence the Jewish community in Turkey is agitated by the rumors that were foreign Jews who encourage and make propaganda for antigovernamental demonstration recently in Turkey.

      Reply to Comment

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