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WATCH: At Israeli peace event, Palestinians nowhere to be found

Peace organizations united for roundtable conversations and workshops across Israel, to discuss various Israeli-Palestinian peace initiatives. However, while many Israeli Jews made it out to the events hardly any Palestinians were in attendance.

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  • COMMENTS

    1. Philos

      כולם מדברים על שלום, אף אחד מבין שהוא מדבר לפופיק

      Reply to Comment
    2. The Trespasser

      In the light of the fact that Palestinian Arabs are not seeking any kind of “peace” with Jews, there is hardly any reason for them to waste time.

      Reply to Comment
      • Menil

        Arabs and Jews live just fine together in New York. When you live in a liberal democracy and not an apartheid regime, you have peace.

        Reply to Comment
        • Kolumn9

          When you live as a minority it is easy to get along with everyone because you have no real power.

          Reply to Comment
          • sh

            If you use your power to commit crimes against humanity, spit on the poor, allow corruption to thrive and turn your religion into a rubber stamp for racism, what do you need it for?

            Reply to Comment
        • Kolumn9

          Also, I am curious why it is that Arabs and Jews don’t live ‘just fine’ in the entire Arab world.. Strangely the only place in the Middle East where Arabs and Jews could get together at an event is in Israel. Confusing, isn’t it?

          Reply to Comment
          • Menil

            Not confusing. Like I said, a liberal democracy is the way to go. Israel is more liberal than Hamas, but the direction that the settlers want for the country is a theocracy for their “messiah” or whatever BS they believe in. This direction needs to be reversed in order to bring Israel back on the track to a secular, Western democracy, which is the key to security, stability and prosperity. Peace with Arabs or giving up land is not a requirement for being a successful democracy, but disposing of settler ideology is.

            Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            “Liberal democracy” could be only possible in a society where most (all?) its member understand that such “democracy” is the only way, which is just not the case in this region, where Jewish extremists are but a vague shadow of Muslim extremists.

            Reply to Comment
        • The Trespasser

          Liberal democracy? With laws such as the “Patriot Act” and “Affirmative Action”, throughout surveillance, nearly 3 000 000 (three millions) imprisoned people, constant engagement in offensive wars and multiple false flag attacks against own population?

          Dude, wtf are you talking about?

          Reply to Comment
    3. rsgengand

      For Arabs/Palestinians to join with Israelis in any form of activity, even with ‘left wing peace groups’, they run the risk of being called traitors and/or collaborators.
      Discussions about peace, or anything else, has reached a nadir.
      The Palestinians do not have a leadership that is legitimate, capable, interested or able to progress in any direction, and this has percolated down to the general populace.
      Israel has finally decided to look inward, to solve her internal problems, and the Palestinians can only watch with increasing bitterness and despair Israels burgeoning economy and wealth.
      Many of the ‘foreign peace corp’ are anti-Israel, rather than pro-Palestinian, further exacerbating the problem.
      The way it’s going, a possible unilateral withdrawl to behind the security barrier, may be the solution.

      Reply to Comment
    4. I’m not certain Israel is turning inward to solve it’s problems, unless you call universal suffrage a solution. A former Israeli intelligence chief also advocates unilateral withdrawal as fall back. Since the status quo makes a viable Palestinian leadership nigh impossible, it seems, fall back would confirm the general low regard of Palestinians, “let them drown.” But you have the advocates of Greater Israel to fight off first; perhaps some see suffrage as the first engagement there.

      Reply to Comment
      • sh

        Unilateral withdrawal does not solve the basic problem. The borders have to be drawn and who lives where within them has to be agreed between Palestinians and Israelis. If no leaders are up to the task, ordinary Palestinians and Israelis will have to produce new ones.

        It seems to be dawning on supposedly liberal, secular Egyptians and those watching what happened in Egypt that including their religious people instead of rejecting them could be a better path to democracy. Each of the two sides ended up being the same with a different label and the ferocious enmity between them handed the country back to the army, against which the people had revolted in the first place.

        If peace is ever achieved, Jews and Muslims should be able to visit their shrines and holy places freely without needing to “own” them (they are, after all, the religious heritage of infinitely more people living beyond the eventual borders of Israel-Palestine than within them).

        Reply to Comment

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