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Visualizing Occupation: Children under Israel's legal regime

The different legal systems under which Israelis and Palestinians are tried apply to children as well. As +972 has consistently documented, Palestinian children arrested by the army are treated by the military court system as “potential terrorists.” The visual below demonstrates what would happen should two 12-year-old boys, one Israeli and one Palestinian, get arrested for fighting. One would swiftly be brought before a judge, given access to a lawyer, tried and spared jail time. The other could face two years in jail without trial. This illustration is the eighth in a series of infographics on Palestinian civilian life under occupation.

By Michal Vexler, with the cooperation of Caabu – The Council for Arab-British Understanding

 >For the entire Visualizing Occupation series click here

This graphic has been updated in accordance with amendments on detention practices recently instituted by the Israeli army.

____________________

Michal Vexler is a designer and an activist. This work – part of a series of infographics on the effects of the occupation on Palestinian civilians – is presented here with her permission. See the series, Visualizing Occupation, in full here.

 >For the entire Visualizing Occupation series click here

Related:
Report by British jurists details horrors of Israeli child detention
Testimonies by Israeli soldiers detail abuse of Palestinian children
Hope ends here: The children’s court at Ofer Military Prison
When a Palestinian child becomes an enemy

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  • COMMENTS

    1. Mihai-Robert Soran

      What data is the infographics based on? I mean: Where can I find the martial law you seem to quote in order to check the the data?

      Reply to Comment
    2. it’s way too extreme! it’s way too far to say there’s Apartheid (Holocaust term!) in Israel…every coin has to sides and it is important to be familiar and open to both of them. Especially in a complex place like Israel…

      have u ever bn to Israel? ever went to Sderot city and met there a kid who got hurt by rockets? heard about terror attacked made by 12-16 yo that caused the death of childrean??? read more from both sides befor u rite Apartheid..
      read about the that term.

      http://www.adl.org/israel/israel_attacks.asp

      Reply to Comment
      • “Apartheid” is not a Holocaust term. It comes from South Africa, which never engaged in mass gassing and burnng of any.

        Yes, the situation is very complex. We can ask Israeli children; we can ask Palestinian children. Both will have difficult stories. One set does not negate the other.

        Reply to Comment
    3. all the Israeli Palestinian conflicts brings a lot of money for art creators as you coz it is a hot topic to write and create about. no matter what are the true facts and people behind. the truth is not like what u said and many Palestinian kids are involved in terror attack

      plz post my comment even if its matchs not your ideas shbh

      Reply to Comment
    4. The Trespasser

      It would be very interesting to see on what offenses Israeli and Palestinian minors are arrested and prosecuted.

      Although author attempt to claim that this report concerns similar offenses it is not true of course.

      Question to the author:
      Palestinian child has been caught throwing stones at Israeli vehicle.
      What is in the best interest of the child?

      Reply to Comment
      • Anne O'Nimmus

        It is in the best interests of the child that Israel stops demolishing his home, his school, stops stealing his fathers land, destroying his crops, his business, etc, and ultimately it is in the best interests of the child if Israelis get out of Palestine altogether!

        Reply to Comment
      • You’re right. It’s not for the same offences. No army comes knocking on an Israeli door at two in the morning to take away an Israeli Jewish kid on an accusation of stone-throwing. The middle of the night is prime time for these arrests in the West Bank; it’s done to inculcate fear. A child also doesn’t have to have picked up so much as a pebble to be arrested. Sometimes the soldiers will decide to teach the neighbourhood a lesson and take kids at random, the theory being that this will stamp out stone-throwing. My landlady’s twelve-year-old boy was a victim of this policy. Then there are arrests on even flimsier grounds. Mahdi Abu Nab, a twelve-year-old with learning disabilities who attends a special school, was arrested by border police as he played outside with a toy gun. The police stopped their jeep and claimed he posed a threat to their lives. When he was taken before the judge, he was unable even to give his age; he said he was four. Mahdi can’t count. It’s obvious to anyone that he is a severely disabled child. Didn’t stop the Magav from taking him. This happened in Silwan. Can you imagine that happening to a Jewish kid a half-hour walk away in Nahalot?

        As for the child’s best interests, that would be to live without fear of the army, which means no martial law that sets them apart as inferior on the basis of their birth. It is also not in their interests for people to try and paint child abuse as somehow justified (by this very complicated situation, you understand). There is no special secret about life in Israel/Palestine that makes what happens to these kids remotely OK, and it’s sickening to watch when grown men and women scramble around trying to justify putting a twelve-year-old boy behind bars in a military prison, with no access to his family or legal help, no right to hear what he’s been charged with, at risk of torture. And kids under twelve aren’t off the hook – they can’t be given custodial sentences by a court, but they can still be arrested. The youngest Palestinian child to be arrested to date, to my knowledge, was five years old. There is no justification. None. No matter how many times people invoke Sderot or rockets (why, have these children been assembling them in the playground in their free time?), no matter how deep your conviction that Palestinian kids are an altogether different species of miniature criminal mastermind who naturally require different treatment from Israeli kids, there never will be a justification.

        Reply to Comment
        • The Trespasser

          Vicky,

          Acknowledgement of something as “wrong” is of rather little interest unless one would tell how to make it “right”

          One would say – go out of Palestine.
          Ok.
          Two questions:
          1 – To what borders?
          2 – Would be there permanent peace agreement?

          You see, Palestinians will remain outlaws as long as their leaders avoid signing such agreement, the only problem for them is that such agreement would mean that there will be Jewish state. Unthinkable really.

          Reply to Comment
          • As a friend of mine always says, this is not about states, this is about rights. Ending a culture of institutionalized child abuse has nothing to do with drawing lines on a map. When I walk home from Bethlehem city centre at dusk, there is a point from where I can see Har Homa, and I know that kids go to bed there without fear that they will be dragged out of it in the middle of the night. There is no need for Har Homa’s population to move a few miles westward in order for Bethlehem’s children to have that same basic right. The most necessary component in the prevention of child abuse is illustrated by something that happened to my boss two years ago. She had a permit for Jerusalem, and she decided to take her two daughters to the zoo. When the checkpoint soldier heard where they were going, he said, “Why, don’t you have enough animals in Palestine?” My boss’s eldest daughter was very agitated. “Mum, he called us animals!” Describing the incident to me afterwards, my boss told me that even though she has experienced far worse at the hands of the occupation (including the death of her uncle) this is the person she will find it hardest to forgive, “because he looked at my girls like they were nothing.”

            This is what is needed: recognition that Palestinian children matter just as much as Jewish ones. The recognition has to happen on both a personal and a legal level. All juvenile detainees given the same rights in custody. No child put in a hood and shackles because he happens to be Arab and this is just what you do with Arab children. No excuses that these kids are somehow very dangerous and the army is in a difficult position and it has no choice.

            The idea that this problem would fade away if only there were firm borders fails to take into account the impact that the persecution of children has on the soldiers who are tasked with carrying it out. When they finish their service they carry the memory of what they did home with them; a clean break between them and the kids they hurt will never be possible, no matter where the line on the map is eventually drawn. This is why accountability is also necessary, and abstract discussions of borders and statehood don’t facilitate that. They are just a way to keep the issue at arm’s length, a comfortable distance away.

            Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            Vicky,

            >As a friend of mine always says, this is not about states, this is about rights.

            Do Palestinian kids have right to throw stones at speeding vehicles?

            >Ending a culture of institutionalized child abuse has nothing to do with drawing lines on a map.
            Regretfully, in real world it has everything to do.

            In this specific case – these kid will keep throwing stones until:
            A – Palestinian police will start persecuting them for that – kids surely wouldn’t won’t to mess with PA Police
            B – There will be no roads with Israeli drivers accessible to these children.
            Both solutions include drawing lines.

            >This is what is needed: recognition that Palestinian children matter just as much as Jewish ones.
            Such recognition is definitely necessary, however it must be the case on both sides.

            Basically, looking via tank’s targeting optics at distance of 1500 meters one can’t tell kid with a rusty pipe from and adult with RPG launcher.

            Responsible are even not parents, but those who drag children into conflict.

            >The recognition has to happen on both a personal and a legal level.
            On a legal level children who repeatedly engage in such activities and do not attend school are sent to closed institutions.
            Are you sure their parents wouldn’t object to that?

            >All juvenile detainees given the same rights in custody.
            Not possible until Army deals with it. Not Army business, so new lines must be drawn.

            Only political solution could resolve this issue – there must be one singular body which is responsible for these children be in in 1SS or 2SS.

            Reply to Comment
          • I described how child arrest works in the OT. You take it for granted that these kids have thrown stones at cars and this isn’t the case. Even if it were, do you think it’s necessary to turn up in the middle of the night several days or weeks after the event with blindfolds and leg-irons? If so, why? That situation doesn’t look remotely like the hypothetical you give (someone trying to work out whether he’s facing a child with a pipe or an adult with a rocket-launcher). How can you use a far-fetched illustration like that, and then talk to me about the ‘real world’?

            Most stone-throwing incidents around here involve the army. That army has total control over every aspect of these kids’ lives, and they know it – if they can go to school, where they can play soccer, if they see their friends in the next town, the list goes on. They also know that it isn’t this way for the settlers down the road, and they resent it. They’re taught by the system they live under that they are inferior, day by day, and you say that recognition of worth has to work both ways? My boss tries to teach her daughters that in spite of what he does, the soldier who called them animals matters, and she does a good job – I doubt they’d ever throw stones at him. But you know what? No one has any right to expect that from them. Here we have people dismissing/rationalising a military occupation that is punitive to every single child who has to live under it, and choosing to focus instead on kids with rocks in their hands. As though they are the problem here, the epitome of violence, and they have to become perfect saints before they deserve to be treated like children. And this is what occupation does – they aren’t children any more, they’re just potential terrorists at worst, de facto criminals at best.

            They know that’s how you see them. Don’t you blame them if they get angry. It is also a form of victim-blaming to talk about the IDF needing ‘practical advice’ on how to behave with children. In Silwan twelve-year-old Ahmad Siyam was dragged out of the house hooded and in shackles at four a.m., sobbing to his father, “Dad, don’t let them take me away.” His house was surrounded by approximately fifty troops and police; he was accused of throwing stones at soldiers during a demo. His seven-year-old cousin was arrested on the same charge. It should be self-explanatory that you don’t do that to a young boy, and there are soldiers who realise this. They struggle in the aftermath because of the culture of denial and defensive excuse-making that anaesthetises conscience and forces people into an ‘Emperor’s New Clothes’ mentality: “It’s all so difficult – it’s inevitable, nothing we can do until a peace agreement – there must be a good reason…”

            Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            Vicky,

            Stone-throwing incidents do take place and must be dealt with.

            Why?
            Because after more than 2 decades of dealing with minor stone-throwers the only way stop them from it was to scare.
            What would be really interesting to see is lists of names/addresses which were visited by IDF on stone-throwing business.

            Such list would give very detailed picture and would allow to determine whether IDF voluntarily violates rights of children just for fun or indeed only those who are repeatedly spotted throwing stones are persecuted.

            Situation I’ve described might seem hypothetical only to someone with no military experience.

            >They’re taught by the system they live under that they are inferior, day by day
            But why are you blaming Israel for that? Until 1987 integration into one state was going rather successfully. There were hardly any incidents, just few checkpoints and no arrests of children at night.

            Why did it changed? What made Palestinian children to start throw stones?

            >and you say that recognition of worth has to work both ways?
            Yes. Palestinians have to appreciate their children as much as Israelis appreciate theirs.

            >No one has any right to expect that from them.
            Everyone is free to do what one pleases.
            However one should also consider consequences of one’s words and deeds.

            Here we have people living under a military occupation because their leaders three consecutive times refused to give their people state.
            What for exactly are you blaming Israel?

            >Don’t you blame them if they get angry.
            They only should be angry at those who’ve sent their older brothers and future parents to throw stones back in 1987.

            IDF wasn’t seeking this conflict and wasn’t prepared to it, it was never meant to spread over another 25 years.

            What you are suggesting now is that instead making Palestinian children stop throwing stones Israel should create closed institution (with school, psychologists, playground, library and pool) for minors which would hold and educate every child who were spotted throwing stones more than once or twice – because that’s what state would do with Israeli kids doing the same.

            Number of detainees would rise from 100-150 now at least tenfold, for only serial offenders are put in jails now.

            Basically almost all of children you’ve mentioned would be long taken by social workers – ask their parents what would they think of that.

            Can you imagine the magnitude of this project?
            Fierce opposition of parents and PA who would claim that children in this institution are brainwashed and subjected to medical experiments…

            And god forbid there would be one sick teacher who would molest a kid – that would surely cause world war.

            For what it seems from here it is the PA who is responsible for these children.

            Israel might only be blamed for wrong handling of unprecedented situation.

            What *practical* steps could you suggest which would not ultimately lead to creation of additional world-approved detention centers?

            Reply to Comment
          • AJM

            What pathetic obfuscation and excuse-making. All in defense of a system of racist inequality from Trespasser. All in a desperate attempt to avoid the obvious issue that Israel treats Jewish settler children differently than it treats Palestinian children who live next door to them.

            “What *practical* steps could you suggest…?”

            If you were not so committed to defending racism, the answer would be obvious: Palestinian children should have exactly the same legal protections that Israeli settler children do.

            But maybe a solution that is not racist seems “impractical” to you?

            Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            AJM,
            Palestinian children can not have same legal protection as Israeli. In my previous post I’ve explained why.

            It has nothing to do with racism – unless of course you think that every Arab has inherent right to throw stones as he pleases.

            Reply to Comment
          • You are still turning your face away from the issues at stake by a.) taking it for granted that the army must be arresting children for a legitimate reason and b.) not addressing the question of what happens to those children when they’re in custody. Raiding a child’s bedroom in the small hours of the morning (60% of arrests take place between the hours of midnight and 5:00 – the children are specifically targeted at this time), hoods, shackles, beatings? Even supposing the children have actually thrown stones, how does this scenario correspond with the example you gave (the army struggling to identify whether they are facing a child with a rusty pipe or an adult with a rocket-launcher)? It doesn’t fit. Saying that I don’t understand why the poor army has to do these things because I don’t have military experience is another Emperor’s New Clothes argument: “There is a very special good reason why all this happens, but you wouldn’t understand…” If you’re going to defend this, do so, but you need to be brutally honest about what it is you’re defending.

            This has been going on in the Territories since the occupation began. I have often told the story of how a friend of mine was punished for breaking curfew, as a young teen back in the seventies: the army made him stand in a pit by the side of the road in the blazing heat, with no water and no toilet facilities, for the whole day. When Israeli Jews talk about how good and quiet things were back in the day before the Palestinians got so unreasonable and started chucking stones about, they mean how good and quiet things were *for them*. The ‘integration’ you speak of consisted of Palestinians cleaning Israeli bathrooms, Israelis buying cheap goods in Palestinian stores. Martial law never has been anything other than punitive and brutal, and the ignorance – and arrogance – behind assertions like yours, made by people who never had to experience what they describe as so good, is another source of great anger.

            Finally, you are taking agency away from both the soldiers who commit abuse and the children they harm by making out that this is the fault of a puppet PA and the children’s families. As though people must be telling children to throw stones (because the children could have no possible reason for personally resenting army presence in the school playground, none at all). As though soldiers who carry out those midnight arrests have no choice in the matter, they couldn’t help beating up that teenager and shoving the barrel of a gun in his mouth, it’s all the PA’s fault for leaving them with no choice. For someone who is so keen to preach personal responsibility to seven-year-olds, you let grown men off the hook easily enough.

            As for the idea that by advocating an end to military custody for children I am asking Israel to create ‘closed institutions’ for them – no. I work in child and adolescent mental health. There are plenty of options for the treatment of traumatised and brutalised children in their own communities (when they need treatment, of course; being pissed off at a repressive army regime is not a psychological illness and it is solved easily enough by removing the army from the children, not by removing the children from home). Residential treatment is rare, for good reasons, and it’s definitely not what settler kids who throw stones get – they are left alone, by and large. Trying to package martial rule over children as the one viable alternative to residential care, as though the IDF is some kind of therapy provider that is doing its poor beleagued best, is the weakest and worst of all the justifications you’ve offered so far. As I said before, if you’re going to defend this, defend it, but don’t try to dose it up with sugar and act as though you’re all about child welfare.

            Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            Vicky,

            I’m only taking for granted that children are not allowed to throw stones at vehicles.

            Palestinian and Israeli children could not even theoretically have same rights in custody – there is no legal mechanism to process Palestinian minor offenders because repetitive cases of stone-throwing would require Palestinians to be put in a boarding school, as Israeli kids are. Since there is no such schools and at current stage could not be even theoretically, there is no way for complete equality under the law which forces IDF to find it’s own ways.

            Kid with rusty pipe vs. adult with rocket launcher analogy was brought to show that army can’t be held fully responsible for all it’s supposed wrongdoings because it’s means and goals are not of humanitarian nature.

            In the example the kid with rusty pipe would be blown into pieces exactly as adult – because no-one in that tank would want to find out whether it was a pipe or not.
            Soldiers really can’t be blamed for that – only those who’ve sent them – or that kid to have a look around.

            Integration was interrupted after only 20 years passed – not enough time by any standard, especially give circumstances. Russian Aliyah btw is still not 100% integrated although more that 20 years have passed and there never was a bad blood.

            How exactly do you know how it was before 1987? There is a slight chance that you’ve seen all of it with your own eyes, so you have to rely on biased stories.
            Stories are of little interest – people might lie, forget, have hidden desires. One story of a punishment does not create a picture of harsh repressive occupation.

            What is really interesting is facts.
            For instance:
            Number of checkpoints before and after 1987
            Violent accidents before 1987
            Minors arrested before 1987
            Number of Palestinians employed in Israel before 1987

            The integration I’m speaking of included much more than Palestinians cleaning Israeli bathrooms and Israelis buying good from Palestinians.

            You see, people who tell you how it was are not interested in you believing that there was an actual chance for coexistence until terrorist Arafat made it impossible.

            Yes, the PA.
            Even not PA, just few very specific people.

            It’s simple – in 1987 kids had no more reasons to throw stones than in 1986 of 1985.
            Whoever told them to start throwing stones is to be held responsible for this perpetual cycle of violence. Army hardly ever was stationed near playgrounds until well in 1st Intifada, so no, these children had no good reason to start throwing stones until some adult have told them.

            Soldiers, who mostly are 18-19 y.o. – factual teenagers – hardly could be called grown men – unless you’d be able to explain what happens on persons 18th birthday which turns child into adult.

            Of course they do have choice – scare the kid so he’d stop throwing stones or put him away for good.

            >it is solved easily enough by removing the army from the children
            Which means that until political solution absolutely nothing could be done. Didn’t I’ve said it before?

            IDF only does what must be done, obviously not in the most humane way, yet nevertheless rather efficient. Anyway, until another working solution is introduced (ex. by removing soldiers) things will stay as they are.

            Settler kids thrown stones at speeding vehicles? Where and when?

            I’m not trying to justify anything – if Palestinians have right to throw stones, IDF has right to do anything it could to stop them.

            p.s. why would I care about Palestinian children welfare while their own kinsmen not only disregard it completely but also are using children in their unjust war against Jews?

            Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            Vicky,

            I’m only taking for granted that children are not allowed to throw stones at vehicles.

            Palestinian and Israeli children could not even theoretically have same rights in custody – there is no legal mechanism to process Palestinian minor offenders because repetitive cases of stone-throwing would require Palestinians to be put in a boarding school, as Israeli kids are. Since there is no such schools and at current stage could not be even theoretically, there is no way for complete equality under the law which forces IDF to find it’s own ways.

            Kid with rusty pipe vs. adult with rocket launcher analogy was brought to show that army can’t be held fully responsible for all it’s supposed wrongdoings because it’s means and goals are not of humanitarian nature.

            In the example the kid with rusty pipe would be blown into pieces exactly as adult – because no-one in that tank would want to find out whether it was a pipe or not.
            Soldiers really can’t be blamed for that – only those who’ve sent them – or that kid to have a look around.

            Integration was interrupted after only 20 years passed – not enough time by any standard, especially give circumstances. Russian Aliyah btw is still not 100% integrated although more that 20 years have passed and there never was a bad blood.

            How exactly do you know how it was before 1987? There is a slight chance that you’ve seen all of it with your own eyes, so you have to rely on biased stories.
            Stories are of little interest – people might lie, forget, have hidden desires. One story of a punishment does not create a picture of harsh repressive occupation.

            What is really interesting is facts.
            For instance:
            Number of checkpoints before and after 1987
            Violent accidents before 1987
            Minors arrested before 1987
            Number of Palestinians employed in Israel before 1987

            The integration I’m speaking of included much more than Palestinians cleaning Israeli bathrooms and Israelis buying good from Palestinians.

            You see, people who tell you how it was are not interested in you believing that there was an actual chance for coexistence until terrorist Arafat made it impossible.

            Yes, the PA.
            Even not PA, just few very specific people.

            It’s simple – in 1987 kids had no more reasons to throw stones than in 1986 of 1985.
            Whoever told them to start throwing stones is to be held responsible for this perpetual cycle of violence. Army hardly ever was stationed near playgrounds until well in 1st Intifada, so no, these children had no good reason to start throwing stones until some adult have told them.

            Soldiers, who mostly are 18-19 y.o. – factual teenagers – hardly could be called grown men – unless you’d be able to explain what happens on persons 18th birthday which turns child into adult.

            Of course they do have choice – scare the kid so he’d stop throwing stones or put him away for good.

            >it is solved easily enough by removing the army from the children
            Which means that until political solution absolutely nothing could be done. Didn’t I’ve said it before?

            IDF only does what must be done, obviously not in the most humane way, yet nevertheless rather efficient. Anyway, until another working solution is introduced (ex. by removing soldiers) things will stay as they are.

            Settler kids thrown stones at speeding vehicles? Where and when?

            I’m not trying to justify anything – if Palestinians have right to throw stones, IDF has right to do anything it could to stop them.

            Palestinian children’s welfare is their own and their parent’s hands.

            All they have to do is manifest will to coexist peacefully with Israelis.

            Until then…

            Reply to Comment
          • “this is not about states, this is about rights. Ending a culture of institutionalized child abuse has nothing to do with drawing lines on a map.”– Vicky, above is right. But individuals exist for her, apart from all other categorization. This is not true for Trespasser.

            What this piece documents will simply get worse. This is the One State outcome. Since occupation no longer exists as an actual state of affairs, according to the Israeli Government, the only way out is a solution to the One State outcome. That solution will involve a rights revolution. It would be much better for Trespassers to go back home–in their corporate interest. They will not, so the cases noted here will continue to grow and fester.

            Reply to Comment
      • aristeides

        How entirely expected to see the trespasser rushing to the scene to defend another aspect of Israeli injustice.

        Reply to Comment
    5. Lubilu

      Apartheid, apartheid, apartheid. The World can see it for what it is. If Israel were to abide by International law and if it’s citizens were less hasty to point at rocket attacks and then the end of their own fingers, they might see occupation, roads banned by Arabs, seizing of palestinian land, unequal sentencing based on race, the destruction of Palestinian farms, wells, olive groves, evictions from homes…and so on and on…reprehensible, heartless, arrogance. Apartheid.

      Reply to Comment
    6. Atlas

      Damn, the Hasbara trolls are getting duller and worse by the moment… back in the days they were even funny to read. Not to mention the redaction skills…

      Reply to Comment
      • Jenny

        and the over wrought appalling english. epic fail at appearing like natural commentators.

        Reply to Comment
    7. The authors given a fair example where 2 children are involved in a criminal act together and are treated differently. *IF* the above is based on facts then it’s still unfair that the 2 children are treated differently regardless of anything else you all comment.

      Equal and fair justice for all should be what you’re debating. “Give them their land back” and so forth just shows the idiocy of the Worlds situations. As an English man should I be offended that my country has many different immigrants from around the World, or should I embrace the diversity it brings my country and the richer culture it adds as the World continues.

      I’d rather live in a country where everyone is treated the same, where religion nor creed base any judgement, and where we can all walk together without grief.

      Some countries have formed from mass immigration. Brazil has such a strong nationality and yet was formed from Portuguese, Italian, French, African, and many other World nationalities.

      Your grandad stole my grandads bike is the mantra of the fool.

      Reply to Comment
      • The Trespasser

        Bob,
        There is two major problems in this issue:
        1 – Palestinian children are not Israeli citizens
        2 – Palestinian children are being persecuted for carrying out dangerous activities – mostly for throwing stones at vehicles on roads. There were numerous (lethal) accidents caused by stone hitting driver and/or windshield of speeding car.

        While words of condemnation are numerous there are no practical advises on how IDF should behave while at one hand (some of? a lot?) these children impose very realistic danger and at another there is not only very little cooperation but also direct incitement in many cases.

        just dont say “give them land back”

        Reply to Comment
        • Reply to Vicky’s several comments, above. Show cases where the IDF and Israeli police have treated vanguard settlers and prior resident Palestinians impartially. You cannot rape the land of prior life and expect ever passive reply. Violence both overt and structural is carried out on Palestinian prior residents. Defining these children as inherently guilty is yet further violence; it is child abuse, and you would not have it against your own. Treat these children as you would treat your own.

          Reply to Comment
      • The Trespasser

        *very little cooperation from their parents side.

        By the way, there were cases when parents who were trying to ban their children from acting against Israel were threatened by militants.

        Reply to Comment
    8. More terrorists off the street. Where’s the problem? How do muslims treat everyone in their own countries? Oh that’s right, they deserve to be treated like dogs.

      Reply to Comment
    9. Julius

      The sad thing about this infographic is that it is being spread among anti-Semites here in Norway.

      I see the reason to fight for children’s rights, but I do not see any reason to spread an infographic suggesting that Jews enjoys mistreating Palestinians..

      Reply to Comment
      • It is a flowchart showing the very different treatment that is meted out to children under Israeli kids under civil law and Palestinian kids under martial law. It has absolutely nothing to do with Jews and it certainly does not suggest anywhere that Jews enjoy mistreating Palestinians. If you honestly consider this depiction of the parallel legal systems to be anti-Semitic, then how exactly do you suggest people talk about those systems? Your comment then translates as, “I see the reason to fight for children’s rights, but be quiet.”

        Reply to Comment
        • Write. What you say here is always extremely well considered, but it vanishes in a week or so. Keep accumulating pieces on your own site as well. As that bundle grows, perhaps a new use will be found for it. Write.

          Sorry for the prodding, but this is my usual reaction to your comments. You are as impartial as is possible in this climate, focusing on children as children, and that is a great value.

          Reply to Comment
          • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=78Uk-ZnYdYU

            I think you might appreciate this video. It is a short animation made by youth from Bethlehem and Dheisheh a couple of years back, when people from a Belgian visual arts group came. I was very interested to see which of their experiences the teenagers chose to spotlight. They did include ‘big’ stuff (being in prison, becoming homeless) but they jumbled those up with things like sudden curfews interrupting their football games and not being able to see their friends. It gives some insight into life under military law through their eyes. I think the most important thing is to try and see as they see.

            I know there aren’t many people writing from this angle and I do want to write more. I’m a bit snowed under though – lots to do, little time.

            Reply to Comment
        • Pablo

          I stand with Greg: write. I´ve read all your comments under this post and the way you explain and state things, even in the face of nonsensical stubborness and twisted truths offered by people like The Trespasser has dazzled me. You use solid arguments, backed by information and expressed with an amazing self-control and politeness. And that is very rare to find on any comments section nowadays.
          We are lucky to have people like you speaking up, even when people like you are definitely a minority around the world.
          So yes, write, and do it in places where it matters more and people will appreciate it.

          Reply to Comment
    10. Arnon Zangvil

      Thanks Michal. Amazing work.

      Reply to Comment
    11. JerusalemS

      You do know that the Geneva Convention forbids the occupying power from changing the law that governed the occupied land? The west bank works on a mix of Jordanian and British law. It’s ILLEGAL and is a WAR CRIME for Israel to change the law to fit its own.

      If Israel did that, and equalised the situation the gang of self-haters in this publication would be the first to yell about annexation and illegal occupation. Hypocrites.

      Reply to Comment
    12. Unquestionably believe that which you said. Your favorite reason seemed to be on the net the simplest thing to be aware of.
      I say to you, I certainly get annoyed while people consider worries that they just don’t know about.
      You managed to hit the nail upon the top and also defined out the whole thing without having side effect , people can
      take a signal. Will probably be back to get more.

      Thanks

      Reply to Comment
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