Analysis News

David Ben Gurion

  • How the Israeli media covers massacres: Lessons from 1953

    The killing was justified, the terrorists hid among the civilian population, the West is anti-Semitic, and on second thought, perhaps the whole thing never actually happened. From the 1953 Qibya massacre to Operation Protective Edge, the Israeli media is the same media, and the lies the same lies. By John Brown At 9:30 p.m. on the night of October 14, 1953, soldiers from Israel's Paratroopers Unit as well as Commando Unit 101 fired mortars at the West Bank villages (then under Jordanian control) of Qibya and Ni'lin. Following the barrage, over 130 soldiers swarmed Qibya, laying down land mines on the…

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  • After Kerry, only BDS may save the two-state solution

    Not even Ben-Gurion would be able to rally the political support necessary to displace masses of settlers as long as there is no price to be paid for the occupation. So how much longer can liberal Zionists sit and watch the status quo remain static? If instead of trying to persuade Israel to change, two-state supporters started holding it responsible for refusing to change, it could have a jarring psychological impact on the country and its leaders. Now that the Kerry peace talks have failed and everyone has given up hoping that Netanyahu will change, what's the new plan for…

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  • The death of an Israeli war hero and Palestinian 'incitement'

    Meir Har-Zion was a murderer, yet he was idolized this week by the Israeli media and the country's highest officials. The Hebrew media in Israel bid farewell this week to one of the IDF’s mythological heroes, Meir Har-Zion. Har-Zion was practically legendary when I grew up, the most celebrated warrior of the IDF's Unit 101, which carried deadly “retribution” operations across Israel’s borders. “Israel’s hero,” read the front page headline this morning on Israel Hayom, the widely read free daily. Similarly adoring coverage could be found on the pages of the Post, Times of Israel, and even the U.S.-based Tablet. “One of our…

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  • What does the future hold for Israel’s military politicians?

    Could the Jewish state ever be lead by a class of non-military politicians? Until there is a peace agreement with the Palestinians, it seems unlikely. And even then, who knows? By Thomas G. Mitchell Historically there have been two types of Israeli leaders who have been willing to give up territory to the Arabs in exchange for peace. The first type consists of conservative civilian politicians who distrust and fear the Arabs, but who, because of foreign pressure or opportunity, are willing to make peace under the right circumstances. Examples of these are Golda Meir in 1974, Menahem Begin in 1977-79 with…

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  • Cabinet OK's razing Bedouin towns to build Jewish settlement in their place

    After being expelled and relocated in the 1950s, the residents of Umm al-Hiran are about to lose their homes once again - this time to make way for a Jewish national-religious settlement. (This post has been updated.) The Israeli government on Sunday made one of its most outrageous decisions in recent years (and there is no shortage of those, as you know). The cabinet held a special session in Sde Boker - the Kibbutz in which David Ben-Gurion is buried – to approve plans to build a new Jewish town (along with several others - all for Jews) in the northeast…

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  • Radio Ramallah: The cultural bridge that was

    Between 1949-1967 there was a radio station that united West Bank Palestinians and Jerusalem Jews. It wasn't interested in propaganda or demagogy, only playing the most popular Western and Arabic music. A brief history of Radio Ramallah and the legacy it leaves behind.  By Niros* Last Saturday night, while walking on Tel Aviv's Ha'aliya Street, a man from Ramallah turned toward me and my partner. He and three of his friends were a little drunk and in a good mood. It seemed that they had just returned from some Tel Aviv club. He spoke to us first in Arabic before…

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  • Have you murdered and also taken possession?

    First the moderate Judaism of Mizrahi Jews was trampled and some of them were pushed into an extreme orthodox practice that originated in Europe. Then the Mizrahi Jews were blamed for Ashkenazi-originated orthodoxy, and now MK Ruth Calderon reinvents moderate Judaism as if none of this has ever happened. By Avraham H. Muthada (Translated from Hebrew By Iris Barner) Ruth Caldreron’s maiden speech in the Knesset (Hebrew) left a mark in our memories and amazed the Israeli public. Ever since, the secular Midrashas (seminaries for women) she represents are sprouting up everywhere and are presenting a refreshing, new Jewish discourse.…

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  • ‘How can this monkey be talking about an ideology that developed in Europe?’

    ‘We are progress and modernization, freedom and equality, ‘peace and love.’ And they, what are they?’ On the history of the painful relationship between the Israeli Left and Mizrahim. By Ron Cahlili (Translated from Hebrew by Orit Friedland) The common wisdom is that Mizrahim and the Left are like oil and water, and that the two shall never meet. This is odd, because a lot of the immigrants who came to Israel from Islamic countries in the 1950s, and from Iraq and Egypt in particular, were Communists. That is, lefties. Thanks to them, says Sami Michael [prominent Israeli writer of Iraqi…

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  • The post-Netanyahu era starts tomorrow

    Bibi will be the lamest of ducks in his next and last term as PM. Hold the applause, though – what's rising up to take his place is worse.  If, as expected tomorrow, Likud-Yisrael Beiteinu gets in the low-30s in Knesset seats, this election will mark the beginning of the post-Netanyahu era. Bibi will remain as prime minister as long as the new government survives, but he will be a lame duck, helpless to rein in the demagoguery and wild initiatives of the quasi- and not-so-quasi-fascists in his coalition. He will watch the chasm widen between Israel and the West, Israel…

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  • A song was born: The tale of a controversial tune

    Six or seven years ago, I was sitting in Tel Aviv's Cafe Ginzburg with a man I admire deeply. Mikhael Manekin was then, along with Yehuda Shaul, one of heads of Breaking the Silence. BTS was still a budding organization at the time, made up entirely of Israeli soldiers who participated in the occupation and sought to document and inform of its atrocities. The organization was expanding its activities. Manekin came to Tel Aviv to brainstorm on organizing tours for Israelis and foreigners in Hebron. "I would like to bring authors there," he told me. "I feel that authors have…

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  • The NYTimes has it wrong: Israel's roots are not liberal

    Perhaps the greatest myth about Israel is the one the New York Times subscribes to: that it started out as a 'liberal' country committed to 'human rights.' An examination of the early days demonstrates that the country led by Ben-Gurion and Mapai was no progressive picnic. Recently, the New York Times was bemoaning the declining state of democracy in Israel. My colleague Dahlia Scheindlin noted several errors in the facts cited by the paper. I was more struck by the concluding passage: "One of Israel’s greatest strengths is its origins as a democratic state committed to liberal values and human…

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  • WATCH: Right-wing group posts video of 'Haganah Castrator'

    The supremacist organization Lehava published a video on its website yesterday showing two former Palmach fighters from the Hagana, boasting about how they castrated Arabs upon orders from David Ben-Gurion himself. It's an old clip taken from a documentary made in 2010 called "Nevelot" (bastards). The movie tells about the lives of two men, Meir Lavetovsky and Yitzhak Weinstein, who were the inspiration for a TV show that went by the same name and also based on a book by Yoram Kaniuk. I did not see either the movie nor the documentary. I could not find much information about the two, but…

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  • Gershom Gorenberg and 'The Mystery of 1948'

    An excerpt of Gershom Gorenberg's book published on Slate promises to shed more light on the Palestinian refugee question, but ends up blurring Israel's part in creating it Slate has published a few experts of Gershom Gorenberg's book, "The Unmaking of Israel." I like Gorenberg very much, and I think he is doing a very important job regarding the Israeli settlements (check out his excellent blog for more). Still, I haven't read his book yet (I hope to review it here sometime in the future), so I don't know if the provocative title of the published piece, The Mystery of 1948:…

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