Appreciate this article? +972 depends on your support -- click here to help us keep going

Analysis News

Settler kidnaps, tortures Palestinian kid, gets 18 months

The courts convicted Zvi Strock of kidnapping with intent to harm, assault, and killing of a lamb. He got 18 months

Two days ago, the Jerusalem District Court passed sentence (Hebrew) on Zvi Strock. The latter, the son of Urit Strock of the oh-so-ironically named “Human Rights in YESHA *” organization, was convicted on 14th November 2010 by Judge Amnon Cohen of the kidnapping and assault of F (name redacted since he was a minor at the time), a Palestinian shepherd.

The incident took place in 2007; F was 15 at the time; Strock is a settler from the outpost of Esh Kodesh (Holy Fire), which is near the village of Kusra, when F resides. Kusra is surrounded by outposts and settlements, Esh Kodesh being one of the worst. Incidents of assaults by settlers are common, and the Yesh Din – Volunteers for Human Rights organization (which takes testimonies from Palestinians who were attacked or suffered injustice, and tries to present them in court) has received testimonies that that at least once, settlers have set sheep on fire.

According to the verdict, Strock (with another settler, who was not identified), rode a quad bike towards F while he was tending to his flock, along with other shepherds. The second man fired an M-16 into the air, and then attack F physically, striking him with the gun and hands. Strock joined the assault. The two ripped F’s cloths, put him on their quad, and drove off while beating him incessantly. At some point, F passed out. When he woke up, he was wet; he thought the liquid was fuel. He heard Israeli voices speaking in Arabic: “Do I shoot him?”, and heard a negative reply. Later, while blindfolded, he was beaten by other men, who later put him back on the quad, stripped him of what remained of his cloths, and abandoned him.

This was not the first time Strock and F roads crossed. About two months before the incident described above, Strock arrived at the Kusra grazing grounds on a quad with another man (who was also unidentified), walked up to F, screamed this was his (Strock’s) land, and began physically assaulting him and his friends. As a finishing touch, Strock kicked a newly-born sheep kid to death. The court convicted Strock of all charges.

The main article of which Strock was convicted was article 374 of the penal code, “kidnapping for the purposes of grievous bodily harm”: “Anyone kidnapping a person so that he be subject to a grievous assault, and anyone kidnapping a person knowing the person will be so disposed of, are to be sentenced for twenty years”. Even though the assault was Strock’s second one – of F, at any rate; there may well have been others, unreported – and therefore it could not be argued this was his first offense, or an isolated incident; and even though Judge Cohen took care to say he was “deeply shocked and disgusted” when he viewed the photos of F’s wounds, his disgust did not move him to sentence Strock severely: He sentenced him to 18 months of imprisonment (which can be reduced by a third for good behavior), two years of suspended sentence, and a fine of 50,000 NIS (about 14,185 USD).

Now, it may be that Cohen is an exceedingly lenient judge; Unless there are two judges named Amnon Cohen in the same court, he’s the judge who sent the ultra-Orthodox terrorist Michael Naki – who tried to attack the Jerusalem Pride Parade with an IED – to six months of community service (Hebrew). Nevertheless, this is a somewhat extreme verdict. Let’s imagine the opposite scenario: Cohen had to sentence a Palestinian who kidnapped and assaulted – twice! – a 15 years old Jewish settler, and killed one of his sheep for good measure. Let’s just say it wouldn’t be 18 months, but rather something nearer 18 years. Without parole for good behavior.

In his verdict, Cohen notes that Strock’s lawyer cited “a list of sentences, which according to him imposed lighter sentences on more or less similar offenses”. In fact, Strock could say he suffered injustice: If other settlers, like Nahum Korman (who killed Palestinian child Hilmi Shusha) and Pinchas Wallerstein (who killed killed Palestinian child Rabbah Rhanem Ahmed) managed to get away with community service, he is paying an unusually heavy price for kidnapping and assault.

It’s just a Palestinian kid. What’s all the noise about?

* YESHA (Yehuda, Shomron ve’Aza; Judea, Samaria and Gaza) is what the settlers call the occupied territories, a terminology which slowly seeped into military use).

And one more thing: Bashar Assad, his throne twisting in the wind, is desperately promising to end emergency rule in his country, trying to placate the rebels. The same demand motivated the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia. Israel is under emergency rule for some 63 years now, and very few people seem to mind.

For additional original analysis and breaking news, visit +972 Magazine's Facebook page or follow us on Twitter. Our newsletter features a comprehensive round-up of the week's events. Sign up here.

View article: AAA
Share article
Print article
  • COMMENTS

    1. RichardNYC

      Very sad. Sentence should have been longer. But I don’t see a real basis for speculating that a Palestinian would have sentenced to 18 years for the same crime.

      Reply to Comment
    2. This does appear, on first blush, to be a inappropriate sentence.

      However, it would be helpful to have a comparative analysis of sentences for similar crimes committed by Palestinians.

      Without that, all I can do is speculate.

      Reply to Comment
    3. micky

      What kind of a person would do this? Is he nuts? What was the reaction of his fellow settlers? Are people like him ostracized? As far as the sentence, you cited a legal article that called for 20 years but I take it the judge had discretion to reduce the sentence — did he cite extenuating circumstances or is the 20 year provision just a guideline that is rarely followed?

      Reply to Comment
    4. Piotr Berman

      [July 21, 2010|By the CNN Wire Staff] The lawyer for a 30-year-old Palestinian married father of two who has admitted in a plea bargain to rape by deception said Wednesday he will appeal his client’s sentence, which was handed up Monday.”Eighteen months in prison is too much,” said Adnan Aladdin. He is representing Saber Kashour, the Israeli Palestinian who admitted pretending to be a single Jewish man before having sex with an Israeli woman.

      So killing sheep, kidnapping and beating someone senseless is about as bad as getting laid by telling false stories.

      Reply to Comment
    5. Jack

      Piotr- that rape by deception case actually turned out to be much different. More like the woman claimed she was brutally raped but because of her fragile emotional state and unhealthy psychological profile they knew they could not convict the guy of a brutally violent rape so they gave him 18 months instead with this “rape by deception” bullsh*t. So its more like the courts thought a brutal and violent rape = what this kid did. They just gave him this plea bargain to avoid putting the woman on the stand and having her entire sexual history put on trial including the time she worked as a prostitute. Read Lisa Goldman’s reporting on it here:

      http://lisagoldman.net/2010/09/06/a-rapist-who-dodged-jail-or-a-man-unjustly-accused-because-he-was-palestinian/

      Reply to Comment
    6. Amin Nusseibeh

      This story isnt even news because it is typical for ziostan. Yossi, how long will you continue being part of this injustice. Give up your israeli citizenship but keep writing. By retaining your citizenship, you indirectly support these injustices

      Reply to Comment
    7. Sarah

      For how long jewish everywhere in the world will allowed the state of Israel make dirty their name????????

      Reply to Comment
    8. Piotr Berman

      Jack: There was an accusation of violent rape by an emotionally unstable young woman with a history of lies and prostitution. The problem of prosecutors was not that the trial would be too much for her emotional state, but that she was a very impeachable witness. What really happened can be only guessed, but sentences are based on what is proven, plus, apparently, guesses of the judge.

      Perhaps a more fair summary is 18 months for guessed brutality (I do not recall physical evidence being available), and 18 months for totally undeniable brutality that bordered with attempted murder. Plus, what happened to the accomplice of Zvi Strock?

      Amin: this is quite ridiculous. Muslim countries have their share of problems with the justice systems. And you sound like Hasbara provocator which is silly regardless if you are one or not.

      Reply to Comment
    9. max

      I’m a bit lost… We have here 2 instances of legal cases, referring to 2 distinct legal categories, judged by 2 different panels of judges, in a country that’s generally considered as having a strong legal system, and we jump to systemic conclusions? Do we expect a computer-based legal system?

      I’d strongly suspect that Israeli judges are biased, despite – I hope – trying not to be. However, the way to address such problems is certainly not by comments that only ridicule a potentially real grievance

      Reply to Comment
    10. Piotr Berman

      Ynetnews, Published: 01.13.09: Zero tolerance for stone-throwing: Three residents of the northern village of Bir al-Machsur, just off Highway 79, were sentences to lengthy jail terms Tuesday after being convicted of stoning cars. [At least 2 were damaged]

      Haifa District Court Judge Oded Gershon ruled that the court “must not be lenient on such offenses,” and ordered sentences raging from 15 to 21 months.

      Reply to Comment

    LEAVE A COMMENT

    Name (Required)
    Mail (Required)
    Website
    Free text

© 2010 - 2014 +972 Magazine
Follow Us
Credits

+972 is an independent, blog-based web magazine. It was launched in August 2010, resulting from a merger of a number of popular English-language blogs dealing with life and politics in Israel and Palestine.

Website empowered by RSVP

Illustrations: Eran Mendel