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PHOTO ESSAY: A sprawling desert prison, for thousands of refugees

On Thursday, I traveled to the south with a group of journalists and bloggers to view the construction of new detention facilities around Ketsiot, near the Egyptian border. When completed, the four prisons in the area are meant to be able to hold more than 16,000 inmates, making them, together, the largest detention facility for immigrants in the West.

The trip was organized by ASSAF – Aid Organization for Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Israel, with the participation of Physicians for Human Rights, the Hotline for Migrant Workers and Amnesty International. Aid workers and reporters are not allowed into the prisons, so we were only able to enter the construction site of the Sadot facility, which is still under the jurisdiction of the local regional council. We observed the three other facilities from the outside.

There are some 60,000 African asylum seekers in Israel, most of them from Eritrea and Sudan. Many of them survived atrocities not only in their countries of origin but also on the way. Especially notorious is the situation in the Sinai Peninsula, where refugees are subject, for ransom, to kidnapping, torture, rape, and murder. Those who arrive in Israel are the strongest and the luckiest.

Despite having signed 1951 Refugee Convention, Israel doesn’t review the asylum claims of Eritreans and Sudanese, and doesn’t grant them residency rights. The government has extended group status to all Sudanese and Eritreans, which protects them from deportation, but doesn’t give them the right to work or to any other social services in Israel. Israeli politicians have pledged a tougher approach to the refugees, as a means of deterring others from attempting to cross the border to Israel.

Ketsiot, near the Israeli-Egyptian border

Early this year, the Knesset passed the amendment to the Prevention of Infiltration law, which sanctions the detention of everyone who enters Israeli illegally, including minors, for a minimum of three years. A person from an enemy state (for example, anyone from Sudan) can be imprisoned indefinitely. The construction of the prison camps is intended to enable the implementation of the anti-infiltration law.

The Ketsiot area is one of the most remote corners in Israel, a desert region south of Gaza on the Israeli-Egyptian border. We traveled there on November 1, and the heat became unbearable at around noon. Temperatures easily exceed 100 degrees in the summer, and winter nights are very cold.

The first asylum seekers were brought to Ketsiot prison, in which Israeli used to hold thousands of Palestinian prisoners (500 of them are still there). Right next to it, Israel built the Saharonim facility, which has been operating for several years. Across the road, construction of the Sadot prison is under way, and a couple of miles east, one can see rows of tents that comprise the “Nachal Raviv” holding camp.

This is Nachal Raviv. It was built on army land in order to bypass the local zoning committees and objections expressed by the regional council, which claimed that the conditions were not suitable for humans. The planned capacity is said to be between 2,000 and 4,000 inmates.

Nachal Raviv holding facility (photo: Noam Sheizaf)

Construction work on the Nachal Raviv site stopped recently. This facility seems to be the least likely to be populated soon, yet it is still being maintained and could become operational on short notice.

Nachal Raviv holding facility (photo: Noam Sheizaf)

This is the construction site for the Sadot facility, nicknamed “the pizza” for its round shape. Sadot will be able to hold up to 8,000 people.  The regional council has approved the zoning and construction plans for Sadot, and a representative from the council told us that if the construction goes according to plan, the facility will be “suitable.” Still, one should remember that the people who are about to be held here – for indefinite periods of time – have committed no crime.

Sadot prison (under construction). (photo: Noam Sheizaf)

The rooms in Sadot are mobile units. Here is a picture I took through one of the windows. As you can seen, the bunk beds are already ready. The rooms are not air-conditioned and they get very hot in the summer. Sections may have one air-conditioned space where inmates will be able to spend time during the days, but those details aren’t yet clear.

A room in Sadot prison (photo: Noam Sheizaf)

One also needs to consider the effect of holding such a huge population in such conditions for months and years. Even if diseases can be avoided, social problems, from violence to drug abuse, almost certainly can’t. We were told that some inmates in Sadot may be able to work in the area during the day, but those details are not yet clear.

Ketsiot is located on next to Sadot. Taking photos was nearly impossible (it’s an army base), but here is one shot I took through the window. Ketsiot is currently said to hold 500 Palestinians and around 800 asylum seekers, and it has room for more.

Ketsiot prison (photo: Noam Sheizaf)

Saharonim prison is just to the south of Ketsiot (the two can be mistaken for one facility). It is currently reported to hold some 1,700 asylum seekers, including women and children (including infants). Some inmates are said to be held there for years. Saharonim has room for up to 3,000 people.

Here is a picture from afar of the center of the Ketsiot/Saharonim compound.

Saharonim and Ketsiot prisons (photo: Noam Sheizaf)

The thought of children growing up between barbed-wire and watchtowers is heartbreaking.

While the new law allows the state to imprison all asylum seekers, there seems to be no clear arrest policy. It seems that everyone who crosses the border these days is sent to prison. The number of those entering Israel is very low these days, thanks to the fence Israel has constructed, but also because IDF soldiers are said to be operating on the other side of the border, where they hand groups of refugees over to the Egyptian army.

The police is also using the new anti-infiltration law in criminal cases involving asylum seekers. A new decision allows the state to detain Africans who were arrested on suspicion of criminal acts, even after those charges were dropped.

Here is the entrance to Saharonim. Once a refugee is there, it’s very hard to get him or her out.

The gate to Saharonim prison (photo: Noam Sheizaf)

Related:
Abducted from Sudan, tortured in Sinai: Mother and child languish in Israeli jail
A scorching desert jail for asylum seekers, with no way out

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  • COMMENTS

    1. The Trespasser

      Drug abuse…

      Have you been to the old central bus station in TLV lately, by the way?

      African non-Israeli junkies (heroin addicts) are slowly replacing Israelis on TLV streets and it’s not good by any standard.

      Prescription drugs?
      Highly unlikely in controlled environment.

      Of course one could imagine center’s personnel aiding in drug trafficking like it is happening in Israeli prisons, however the situation is a bit different and it is unlikely at least during first years.

      There could be two drug-related problems:
      1 – Home-brewed alcohol, beer basically, which could be prepared from almost any carbohydrates-rich substance. Very good results might be achieved using sugar and yeast.

      2 – Lack of cannabinoid drugs which inalienable part of most African cultures.

      Anyhow these are really some of most insignificant problems.

      While at one hand the situation with African refugees at one hand demands urgent solution, there is not much a state could do other than giving all refugees full civilian rights – employment, medical insurance, etc.

      The problem is that there is already negative dynamics in work availability for some professions, ex. kitchen and sanitation workers, who’ve traditionally have been Arabs and new Olim, are largely replaced by Eritreans and others who have work permit.

      Another problem is they mostly have no useable skills, know hardly any spoken languages and require prolonged education to be employed in anything better than dishwashing.

      Those who have skills and are prone to new languages are doing really fine, by the way.

      My girlfriend recently have made African braids in some apt. on somewhere on Levinsky street. Nigerians, really nice family. Done a beautiful job for about one third of a price – 600 nis vs. 1800 or something in African barber shop on King George st. Took them some 6 hours of almost non-stop work of 2-3 people simultaneously.
      600 NIS tax-free – 150 USD

      Although my GF is absolutely happy, and so am I, I’m not sure that owner of that place on KG would be happy as well, should he find out…

      So if that Nigerian women is to became state-registered barber, as it normally works she will have to learn Hebrew for at least 1.5-2 years + undergo barber courses, another 0.5 years.
      5000-6000 NIS per month MINIMUM for 24 months equals 120 000 NIS
      40 000 refugees 120 000 NIS for each equals 4 800 000 000 NIS, or 1 260 000 000 USD

      Who is going to pay for that?

      Reply to Comment
    2. Jan

      When I looked at these photos I was reminded of another people put behind walls and barbed wire – the Jews of the Warsaw Ghetto.

      The Germans wanted to put the Jews away and now the Jews want to put immigrants away.

      Is there much difference? I don’t see it.

      Reply to Comment
        • Maybe you should add an extra paragraph to the rules. No comparison with western democracies, since they dropped the atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

          Reply to Comment
      • The Trespasser

        There is a great lot of things – more than you could possible imagine – that you don’t see and won’t see ever.

        It is good, however.

        Reply to Comment
        • Jenny

          great and heartbreaking article. If only someone here (Australia) would cover the conditions at the refugee camps here our government is rapidly filling up with people they seem to consider less than human.

          Noam, you need to revise that rule. You published it nearly 2 years ago, when the situation was very different, and I think you should re-read Richard Silverstein’s (who I normally don’t like much)comments on the thread you posted. It is surely time for a re-jig, if a strictly monitored one.

          Reply to Comment
    3. “The thought of children growing up between barbed-wire and watchtowers is heartbreaking.” : Not if your fundamental ontology is racial; individuals are then secondary aspects of the primary ontology, defined as “good” or “bad” based on that ontology. Ban that.

      In Maricopa County, AZ, there has been a “tent city” jail for county inmates for over a decade. The temperatures are easily at 105 + F for two months; over 100 for four months +. The prior in building county jail cells have been turned into a shelter for homeless animals by the sheriff; I kid you not. After at least 3 won wrongful death suits, the Feds (Obama) are finally suing the sheriff for civil rights violations. The sheriff is running for reelection; one mail flyer pointed out he is good to animals. One reason why the open Senate seat here is actually open for grabs (the Dem has a good shot) is that Hispanics have finally had enough.

      I see no feeback in your country through the electoral process. The brutality of the Maricopa County tent city was evident throughout the terms of Bush II; Obama waited until election potential was at its highest before suing in Federal Court. I have some idea of what you face: complete disregard.

      Reply to Comment
    4. rsgengland

      In England ,the vast majority of Asylum seekers that I have met ,have always struck me as being ‘Economic Refugees’.
      I have met a few Political Asylum seekers , but their numbers are small, and they are in their own class .
      I have no doubt that the ‘majority’of asylum seekers in Israel are economic refugees , but there is no
      reliable data avaiable , from either side of the spectrum to ,either prove or disprove this .

      Reply to Comment
    5. Shaun

      Racism, dislike of migrants and governments circumventing laws in order to deport foreigners is not endemic to Israel. Its just sounds better when you add in words like Jews and blacks.
      Very few people are willing to criticize South Africa…
      http://www.sowetanlive.co.za/news/2012/11/06/row-over-foreigners
      Take a look at the comments and see what people in SA really think.

      Reply to Comment
    6. Sam

      What a terrific idea. Hopefully, this will stop them coming

      Seeing as to how they are Muslim, I wonder why they don’t stay in a Muslim country.?

      Silly me, they know that Israel is a democratic country

      They are causing huge crime problems in Israel, the same in Australia.

      Reply to Comment
    7. peter hindrup

      Sam:
      Silly you. Israelis not a democracy. At a minimum to be a democracy the law must apply equally to all citizens.
      In Israel it doesn’t.

      Defend Israel if you must, but get your facts right, first.

      Reply to Comment
    8. Curtis Mullins

      Is America prepared to destroy the world to save illegitimate Israel?

      Reply to Comment

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