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New Knesset member visits a friend in Ramallah: 'This is not normal'

Adi Koll, a relatively unknown Knesset member from Yair Lapid’s centrist Yesh Atid party, posted this picture along with an uncharacteristically long and emotional status on Facebook, the day after she paid a visit to the home of a Palestinian friend in Ramallah. (Translated in full below)

Ramallah (photo: Adi Koll)

Warning! This post will be long, controversial and without color photos, even though I have plenty of photos. I made sure to take pictures throughout the day with the intention posting them to Facebook so I can show what we would all rather forget. But now it feels pointless. No picture can describe what I’ve been through, and even if it could, it wouldn’t achieve anything but to ease the conscience of the viewers. There, we saw it, now we know what they go through. We don’t really need to do anything with that.

Well, you have no clue!

Even if I post a picture of the dirty, frozen compound at Qalandia Checkpoint that I passed yesterday on my way back from Ramallah, you wouldn’t be able to see and surely you wouldn’t be able to feel the humiliation and insults, like the permit-holding Palestinians who have to pass through it day after day. You won’t be able to hear the soldier who was barking at us (“Knesset member? Which Knesset exactly?”) through the sealed glass, demanding that we go back and forth, again and again for no reason at all. And there is no picture and no film that could explain the absurdity, according to which Qalandia, which is part of the Jerusalem Municipality (and its residents pay municipal taxes) does not receive basic services from Israel because it lies beyond the checkpoint, nor from the Palestinian Authority, because it’s outside their jurisdiction. A whole neighborhood which is now a no-man’s land.

More importantly, a picture can be misleading. If it’s an image of the bright and renovated Muqatah, which without much success tries to portray stability of governance, or [a picture] of the city of Rawabi – an artificial architectural catastrophe which aims to sell the Western bourgeois dream to the Palestinians – a four-bedroom apartment with windows on three sides – and thus silence their cries.

No picture. Not one picture would be able to tell the story of my dear friend Amjad. A businessman, who was born in Nablus and lives in Ramallah, married for a second time and father of three children (classic middle class), who lives under countless restrictions but insists that he lacks nothing except the safety of his children. Last week, his two boys came home and told him that during a football game in the neighbourhood they heard “this thing that soldiers used” (radio). Along with some of their friends, they decided to follow the voices until they “discovered” the soldiers, and then all together, threw stones at them.

Amjad, who sent his children to a Christian private school so they will get proper education and not be brainwashed, angrily forbade his children to throw stones or have any contact with soldiers. When they told him that everybody does it, he decided to forbid them from playing outside. He hasn’t slept at night since. He knows that 12-year-old kids don’t really listen to their parents, and he knows the peer pressure they face in their neighborhood. He also knows that he won’t be able to watch over them forever, and how easily children’s games can turn into skirmishes between imbalanced powers, which will result in bloodshed. And he is afraid.

And I am afraid, afraid that we will continue to live this way, and afraid of the fear.

I could post more photos, but not photos of Amjad, because if anyone around him knows that he has a friend in the Knesset, this could be the end of his business and perhaps the end of his life.

I could have posted more photos but I don’t want to. Photos would create a sense of normalcy in the situation. There is nothing normal about life in Ramallah, and there is nothing normal about us letting this happen.

That’s MK Adi Kol. I don’t agree with some of the stuff she says – I don’t think Palestinians are more “brainwashed” than we are – but I advise readers to listen to the emotion. Obviously, her visit was uncoordinated with authorities, a fact which made all the difference. Once you get to see and experience the way Palestinians’ lives really are – even for a brief moment – some feelings are inevitable. MK Koll is not “pro-Palestinian” or biased. It’s reality that is biased.

Related:
No end in sight: Occupation marks 45th anniversary
Israeli occupation: You have to see it to believe it 

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  • COMMENTS

    1. Neil

      Imagine if she’d gone to Hebron…

      Reply to Comment
    2. AYLA

      thank you! It’s really sad that the climate is such that this moved me to tears, that it’s as brave as it is for a mainstream MK to share observations that barely expose the tip of the occupation iceberg. we must let her know that we support her. She’s hearing plenty of the usual dissent, and she needs to know that she has constituent support.

      Reply to Comment
    3. Carol

      I managed to translate some of the reactions left on her Facebook status and i am must say that most of these people are cold, heartless and terrible people. There’s this shiver going down my spine reading them. It makes me throw up.

      How can they not have a heart for the Palestinians? How can they wish just like that to harm them and leave them to starve?

      If anything, every day that goes by makes me think that Israelis are disturbed and sick and they haven’t got the smallest regard for the human lives. They do have it for Palestinian land.

      Reply to Comment
      • AYLA

        Carol–while there is certainly a huge problem of denial among Israelis and a different breed of the same among American Jews, I have really found that comment sections on i/p conflict-related internet posts bring out the haters. Most people, it seems to me, are in numb denial, feeling powerless. This, of course, is also dangerous and depressing. But it’s really important to remember that comment threads are not representative.

        Reply to Comment
      • The Trespasser

        >If anything, every day that goes by makes me think that Israelis are disturbed and sick and they haven’t got the smallest regard for the human lives.

        Palestinian Arabs had unleashed wave of violence and terror against Jews more than 100 years ago and haven’t stopped it for even a minute.

        Why would someone have any compassion to a nation of genocidal terrorists?

        Reply to Comment
        • andrew r

          Calling them “a nation of genocidal terrorists” is itself a genocidal remark.

          Of course, Israelis have their country due to a political movement that had been planning for just as long (100 years) to take Palestine by force. That’s where the lack of compassion comes from.

          And to save myself from the inevitable playing dumb (alias: really being dumb), Herzl tried to get the Germans to establish a protectorate over Palestine, and the Kaiser took the idea seriously enough to discuss it with him. The Zionists from day one wanted someone to use force on their behalf when it wasn’t available to them.

          Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            >Calling them “a nation of genocidal terrorists” is itself a genocidal remark.

            Arabs are notorious for committing genocides and terrorizing minorities. Don’t like my wording? I don’t like it either.

            >Of course, Israelis have their country due to a political movement that had been planning for just as long (100 years) to take Palestine by force. That’s where the lack of compassion comes from.

            No. The lack of compassion comes from a fact that nothing would make a (Palestinian) Arab happier than Jewish blood on his/her hands.

            >And to save myself from the inevitable playing dumb (alias: really being dumb), Herzl tried to get the Germans to establish a protectorate over Palestine, and the Kaiser took the idea seriously enough to discuss it with him.

            One of most idiotic moves by Hertz. Mere hopes to bring civilization to Arab word are laughable.

            >The Zionists from day one wanted someone to use force on their behalf when it wasn’t available to them.

            Because Arabs from the day one made it very clear that Jews can live in Arab countries as 4th grade (after women and dogs) citizens only.

            Reply to Comment
          • andrew r

            I’ve said it time and again, the Zionist movement didn’t care about Jews living in Arab countries when it started colonizing Palestine. No major Zionist figure (that is, someone who established well-known institutions like the kibbutz or became an Israeli leader) saw Mideastern Jews as in need of rescue. Shmuel Yavnieli, who is famous for recruiting Yemeni Jews to work at the moshavim, even considered their position in Yemen higher than in the New Yishuv (This was before the Imam period, so don’t bother with the Wikipedia link).

            Yet at the same time, the WZO adopted the agenda of making colonial-settlers the majority in Palestine. So you are feigning innocence (and being dishonest) by claiming the Zionists wanted to take over Palestine because Jews had circumscribed rights across the Arab world. That’s a post-facto justification many apologists have made up.

            The Zionists wanted to take over Palestine because they saw the creation of a new community of pioneering Jews as the solution to the ‘Jewish problem’. Had rescuing Jews been at the head of the agenda, colonizing one small, restricted location wasn’t a smart way to go about it.

            Reply to Comment
          • Leen

            nsttnocontentcomment

            Reply to Comment
          • Leen

            ‘Arabs are notorious for committing genocides and terrorizing minorities. Don’t like my wording? I don’t like it either.’

            Tresspasser, it is a mark of genocide if you categorize a group of people as genocidal terrorists, thus are ‘deserving’ of whatever is coming to them. It’s called dehumanization.

            It is infact characteristic 3, dehumanization of a certain group of people. Please let us not forget before any genocide, there was rampant dehuminzation of the target group. For instance, before the Holocaust, dehumanization of the Jews (quite a lot of it on religious symbolism, look at what the jews did to Jesus, etc) and linking them to marxists, communism, etc was full force and rampant. Same thing with the Tutsis, where the rational was the Tutsis were traditionally ‘the higher class’, the ‘oppressors’, an ‘extension of Belgian colonization’, who are ‘murderers’, ‘traitors’, etc. Dehumanization was rampant and extreme which led to the Rwandan genocide.

            Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            >it is a mark of genocide if you categorize a group of people as genocidal terrorists, thus are ‘deserving’ of whatever is coming to them. It’s called dehumanization.

            If a group of people time after time reject peaceful coexistence on purely racist basis AND promotes genocide of their neighbours, than failure to characterise these traits of mentioned group basically represents an attempt to alter reality – Arabs hate Jews but we can’t say that because it is racist towards Arabs.

            Not the hatred is racist, by your standards, but mere mentioning of it.

            Reply to Comment
          • andrew r

            “peaceful coexistence” Some of us know better than to buy the Brooklyn Bridge. The Zionists wanted peaceful eviction.

            Of course the immigrants’ professed desire to expel the Arabs solely because they saw the country as Jewish didn’t constitute incitement because they were a bunch of toddlers, not responsible for their words or actions.

            Reply to Comment
        • Carol

          To the “Tresspasser”

          Palestinians were born on that land. Jews came in later. They were immigrants. They executed over 600 people at once right after Hitler did the same to some millions of Jews.

          When you come and take my home, i will bloody breaks your legs and throw you out.

          You are the terrorist for taking what’s mine.

          And if you start with the bla bla this land was mine 2000 years ago, save it. I don’t care.
          You shouldn’t have left in the first place.

          And do you even know why you left?

          The reality is that Israel killed hundreds and hundreds of Palestinians, displaced them, starved them and what do you want them to do?
          Just let you oppress them?

          You are out of your mind. I call that lunacy.

          Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            >Palestinians were born on that land. Jews came in later.

            Nonsense.
            1 – There is no/never was “Palestinians”
            2 – Palestinian Jews were born on this land exactly as Palestinian Arabs were.

            >They were immigrants.

            Exactly as Palestinian Arabs

            >They executed over 600 people at once right after Hitler did the same to some millions of Jews.

            Bullshit.
            Palestinian Arabs have a perfect record of slaughtered Jews.
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_killings_and_massacres_in_Mandatory_Palestine

            >When you come and take my home, i will bloody breaks your legs and throw you out.

            Arab invaders did not have any inherent rights to this land.

            >You are the terrorist for taking what’s mine.

            “What’s yours” means private property. Some 90% of land of Palestine never was in private property.

            >And if you start with the bla bla this land was mine 2000 years ago, save it. I don’t care.
            You shouldn’t have left in the first place.

            Jewish presence in Palestine wasn’t interrupted even for a day.

            >And do you even know why you left?

            Because Roman legionnaires came and made a lot of trouble?

            >The reality is that Israel killed hundreds and hundreds of Palestinians, displaced them, starved them and what do you want them to do?

            Palestinian Arabs were killing Palestinian Jews LONG before the State of Israel started to exists.

            What do I want them to do?

            Stop trying to kill Jews would do nicely to begin with.

            >Just let you oppress them?

            Until after WWII it was Arabs who were oppressing Jews.
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_killings_and_massacres_in_Mandatory_Palestine

            >You are out of your mind. I call that lunacy.

            You are supporting oppression of Jews while denouncing Jewish self-defense. I call it racism.

            Reply to Comment
          • Joel

            “They were immigrants”

            As were Circassians, Bosnians, Egyptians, Turks, Sudanese, Bedouin, Syrians and Algerians who immigrated to ‘Palestine’ in the 19th century.

            Send them packing too?

            Reply to Comment
    4. cy

      This Dvora Bee lady, who clearly doesn’t live in Israel, is no rocket scientist.

      Reply to Comment
    5. Anyone who thinks the nonviolent protests have not played a role in forming alternative perceptions, consider how these protests background frame Kol’s plea. If all protest was violent, the war only view would be more effective at silencing Kol, in outcome. She will be silenced; but the margin of hearing will be greater than otherwise.

      Reply to Comment
    6. eyal

      And? They could have had a sovereign, independent state, had they agreed to israel’s offers (if that’s the problem she’s pointing at). “They” chose to continue the fight and therefore “they” are responsible for “us” setting the checkpoints – which were not there when “they” were peaceful!
      They lost the war – like germany or japan did – but they don’t want to swallow their pride, so they keep on fighting (and losing, as we see). They have to agree to the winner’s compromise, or else face the consequences of their stubborn ever-losing leaders’ decisions

      Reply to Comment
      • Maya

        Yes, it did look that way, and we thought how irresponsible Arafat was, until it was made clear that the deal came with the Palestinians having no control over water and air space. It really wasn’t true statehood.

        Reply to Comment
        • The Trespasser

          Nonsense.

          Control over water or airspace has nothing whatsoever to do with statehood.

          Reply to Comment
          • Scootalol

            Ah, so “statehood” is purely a conceptual thing? Territory, resources, sovereignty, these things are unimportant so long as someone, somewhere, calls it a “State”? So long as it exists on official letterhead, that’s all that needs be concerned with?

            Once again, the two-states of the two state solution are revealed to be Israel and Also Israel.

            Reply to Comment
          • Jan

            “Control over water or airspace has nothing whatsoever to do with statehood.”

            Oh doesn’t it? Do you think that Israel would have agreed to forfeit control over water and airspace?

            In addition to those onerous conditions the so-called “generous offer” would have created three apartheid South Africa-like bantustans plus Gaza. Israel would control not only the water and air space but the ingress and egress from the bantustans. In addition none of the ethnically cleansed Palestinians would be allowed to return. In spite of being on the Israeli pay roll Arafat could not sign this document of surrender.

            You also talked about Palestinians stoning Jews. Are you aware of the settler kids stoning Palestinian kids as they go to school?

            Are you not aware of the terrorist attacks during the 1930s by Jewish terrorists on Palestinian Arabs? These attacks included blowing up an Arab theater and putting bomb laden donkeys in Arab markets.

            What you seem not to understand is that before the Zionist project was unleashed upon the Palestinian Arabs the small minority of Jews in Palestine lived in peace with their Arab neighbors. It was only after the Arabs realized that the Jews were bent on taking as much land as possible that animosity began. I wonder if you would have good feelings toward a people who were bent on taking your land and pushing you out. I think that you wouldn’t.

            Reply to Comment
      • Joel

        And ‘they’ receive aid and comfort from the European left,etal,which makes them less inclined to negotiate and more inclined to struggle for their freedom.

        Reply to Comment
    7. XYZ

      Ending the occupation and creation of a Palestinian state wouldn’t do anything Endito change the attitude of Amjad’s children. Israel would still be near by, there would still be a border and soldiers, Palestinians would still face restrictions at least in crossing that border even though their Arab-Palestinians brothers live on the other side of the border as well. The hate and rage in the Arab world against the very existence of Israel which has been inflamed by decades of propaganda from governmental and non-governmental media sources have left a very deep impression. Even countries “at peace” with Israel have their populations filled with the same rage and hate. A good example is Jordan where the soldier who killed several girls in cold blood at the “Island of Peace” is a national hero and there is a public campaign to have him released from prison. In Egypt, journalist Michael Slackman of the New York Times wrote a series of articles regarding how average Egyptians blames Jews (and, thus Israel) for all the country’s problems, leading absurdly, to the view that Mubarak was a Zionist agent. In Syria both sides in the civil war accuse the other also of being Zionist agents. Sadly, this is the reality of this part of the world.

      Reply to Comment
      • XYZ, that “rage and hate” is growing among Israeli Jews as well.

        I fail to see how the “condominium” of the PA, Israel, and Jordan can work given what you paint here.

        Reply to Comment
    8. Reality check – throwing rocks at soldiers with guns has become a daily “game” for arab kids? sounds like we dont do enough to respond to our enemies’ provocations if it has come to this. let’s not forget these are not our friends and we dont owe them anything. Yes, perhaps there are a minority that are good, but that is not the masses. Let’s do whatever it takes to keep ourselves and our soldiers safe. Let’s put our soldiers and ourselves before those who wish us dead.

      Reply to Comment
      • JG

        Just get the fuck out of occupied territories and the arab kids there stop throwing stones against your beloved soldiers. Simple solution.

        Reply to Comment
        • The Trespasser

          Yet another baseless assumption.

          Arabs, including children, have an age-old tradition of stoning and murdering Jews.

          Reply to Comment
    9. Somewhat simplistic, isn’t it?

      “…There is nothing normal about life in Ramallah, and there is nothing normal about us letting this happen”

      There is plenty of normality in Ramallah, but credit for it goes directly to the PA. When Adi Kol sees problems she attributes it to Israel.

      Why?

      Reply to Comment
    10. fran

      Remember in the holocaust when you saw pictures of a “Jewish” town — which was really a front for a concentration camp–something like an adult summer camp.
      Israel, its hasbara, its friends, my tax money(USA) — have helped her build an artificially fronted country. Behind the artifice, is the occupation, the settlers and a country which is not the morally superior country with the most moral army in the world. Adi Koll is awakening from a deep slumber that her government(s) has created.
      Astonishing, that she has lived in a very narrow world–and did not know what there was to see so very close.

      Reply to Comment
    11. XYZ

      Fran, you obviously know nothing about Jews, Israel or Israelis. Your mantra that Israel is a supposedly an artificial country and Jews are not capable of building and maintaining a state has been repeatedly ad nauseum for 100 years now. A good example of an “artificial country” was the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) which had to build a wall and barbed wire fences around it to keep its population in and it was maintained entirely by Soviet bayonets. The moment those bayonets were withdrawn by Gorbachev, the whole regime collapsed. Israel fights for its own existence and is not dependent on American military support.

      The really artificial countries in the region are Iraq, Syria, Libya, Lebanon and others which have all imploded recently. The Palestinian regime is also propped up (in both its jurisdictions) by international handouts.

      Secondly, regarding the “most moral army in the world”…Israel has no obligation to be that. It only has to live up to international standards and it does so and even (sometimes foolishly) goes beyond that.

      Reply to Comment
      • Haifawi

        International standards don’t allow a country to place its soldiers in a position that Israel requires of its soldiers. Even in Iraq the US Army was never a tool of expanding sovereignty, but solely for the maintenance of public order, however imperfect it may have been.

        Reply to Comment
        • The Trespasser

          >International standards don’t allow a country to place its soldiers in a position that Israel requires of its soldiers

          Rubbish.

          Reply to Comment
    12. Anybody

      Whenever soldiers can make members of parliament “go back and forth”, there’s a country deep down in the cacky. A parliament should control the armed forces – not the armed forces the parliament.

      Reply to Comment
      • The Trespasser

        >A parliament should control the armed forces – not the armed forces the parliament.

        Nonsense.

        A member of any parliament have very little powers outside the parliament building.

        Reply to Comment
    13. Avramele

      People and their governments fed by years of misunderstandings, political demagoguery and blind hatred blunder into wars. Maybe if enough people on both sides acted naively and recklessly in the name of accommodation we might blunder into something approximating peace.

      Reply to Comment
    14. Walid Awad

      The Israeli public in general is ignorant of what is going on in the Occupied Palestinian Territory. The Israeli media reinforces a very negative image of the Palestinian people, and the Israeli governments are happy with this because this gives them a free hand to do what they want to do in the opt without any accountbility, be that internally from the Israeli public or externally from the outside world.

      Reply to Comment
      • The Trespasser

        >The Israeli media reinforces a very negative image of the Palestinian people…

        Oh, the Israeli media…

        I thought that it is suicide bombers and their appraisal, who reinforce the negative image of Palestinian Arabs.

        Reply to Comment
        • XYZ

          Not to mention virulently antisemitic propaganda spewed out in official Palestinian state-controlled media…things like having Muslim preachers repeating ad naseum that “Jews are (supposedly) decendents of pigs and apes”.
          The fact that the Palestinians and their supporters are oblivious to the fact that their behavior and propaganda negatively affects how neutral outsiders in addition to Israelis view them is very surprising.

          Reply to Comment
      • Kamal

        How is the Israeli public ignorant of what goes on when for 50 years its sons and daughters have in their tens of thousands managed and run the occupation on behalf of the state. In fact I would argue that they know what is going on and support it wholeheartedly.

        Reply to Comment
    15. An afterthought: democracy produces wild cards. Koll, placed untested on Lapid’s list, seems to be one. Obama’s placement in the US Senate was also a wild card outcome; so too his capture of the nomination. Perhaps, someday, a wild card will change Israel.

      Reply to Comment
      • The Trespasser

        >An afterthought: democracy produces wild cards.

        Sancta simplicitas.

        Obama is a figurehead. A capper if you please.

        Reply to Comment
    16. francis gerard

      Fortress Israel: The Military Elite Who Run the Country — And Why They Can’t Make Peace

      Israeli elites long ago recognized the usefulness of aligning Israel with Western imperialist interests in the Middle East and openly courted the US on that basis. Israel planned a “nuclear Armageddon” if deterrence fails and Israel were about to be overrun by Arabs.

      In this new work Tyler narrows his focus to the Israeli establishment. He sums up his thesis in the prologue: “Israel, six decades after its founding, remains a nation in thrall to an original martial impulse, the depth of which has given rise to succeeding generations of leaders who are stunted in their capacity to wield or sustain diplomacy as a rival to military strategy, who seem ever on the hair trigger in dealing with their regional rivals, and whose contingency planners embrace worst-case scenarios that often exaggerate complex or ambiguous developments as threats to national existence. They do so, reflexively and instinctively, in order to perpetuate a system of governance where national policy is dominated by the military.”

      cont… http://electronicintifada.net/content/israel-planned-nuclear-armageddon-new-book-shows/11885

      Reply to Comment
    17. Anna Wrobel

      Migration is the single most universal fact of human history. All peoples of the Mideast (as of the world) arrived from somewhere else at some point. The oldest extant cemetery in the region is a Jewish one. Thus the Jordanian use of the “nazi” tactic of trying to destroy and deface such cemeteries, especially in Jerusalem. As to national “legitimacy,” what nation is “legitimate?” All nations are historical, not organic, creations. What makes the U.S., Italy, Germany, Russia, Kenya, Laos, Egypt, Mexico or any other nation more “legitimate” than Israel? This is specious nonsense. All of these were cobbled together out of patchwork quilts of nation-building events, not all of them savory. Palestine never existed as a nation? True, but so what? Plenty of nations once never existed as nations. Another universal fact of human existence is that territories and boundaries (tribal and national) have always been moving targets. The existence of an Israel and the existence of a Palestine do not have to be mutually exclusive. Too bad the Arab League of 1947 couldn’t see that when, in coordination with only the most ardent nationalists of Arab Palestine, decided to micro-manage the whole of Arab Palestine and reject any semblance of non-Arabic presence in the region (and that went for Kurds and other non-Arab minorities as well – so why don’t we shout from the U.N. that “Pan-Arabism is Racism?”), even though a majority of Arab villagers in 1937 Palestine said they could live with a two-state solution, while over 90% of the Jews of Palestine said they were willing. Then Arab collaboration with Nazis in the 1930′s and WW2, with the Arabs and the Nazis having the ‘common enemies’ of Britain and the Jews, caused the hopes of a two-state solution to be killed in the crib. By 1947 the Arab League figured that annihilating Jews was to be routine and the U.N., in spite of its own two-state resolution, did nothing to stop what the Arab League had in mind, until it looked like Israel was actually winning – a big upset considering that five Arab nations attacked a tiny country of barely 600,000, numbers of whom were still sick and worn out by Nazi concentration camps. The Arab League was eliminationist then and continues, to a large degree, to be so in relation to Israel and any non-Arabs in the region. Even Iranians are being force-fed Arabic language under Islamic fundamentalist regimes. If the Arab league has moved somewhat from a completely eliminationist stance, it’s only because of international pressures and their own failing resources in relation to making constant war against Israel. When after 1967, Israel’s “land for peace” proposal was met by the nearly annihilationist Yom Kippur War, yes, many Israelis said “f–k you” to those who would rather make war than retrieve the land through peace treaties. Is that psychology so hard to fathom? If the Arab League would reject “land for peace,” then it could be concluded that they cared to achieve neither. With the Palestinians being the losers
      from every angle – ending up the true underdog as major Arab nations dropped them on their heads when wars against Israel just got too expensive. And WHY did Jordan annex the West Bank and Egypt annex Gaza, when from 1948 to 1967, these territories were in their hands? Why didn’t they begin the process of creating a Palestinian state?! And while taking territories, they kept Palestinian populations in second-class status, only supporting these people in making war, never peace. So here we are, with a two-state solution still being the only viable option. I cry much over spilt milk. IF ONLY…the Arab League had accepted this solution in 1948, we would all be today celebrating the 65th anniversary of Israel AND Palestine (assuming the Arab population chose to keep that Roman-created name). Being the dreamer I am, I like to think that this alternative vision might have resulted in two friendly republics cooperating side-by-side in the mode of modern day Czech and Slovak republics. I hear folks say to me (with sarcasm) “keep dreaming.” Without sarcasm – I think I will do just that.

      Reply to Comment
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