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Chief settler: "We make Israeli economy more stable"

Naftali Bennet, the Director General  of the Yesha Council, is apparently suffering from the heat wave. Otherwise, how could one explain the answers he gave to Yossi Verter of Haaretz today, who asked him about the settler movement that Bennnet heads joining the tent demo.

Verter: Didn’t anyone (in the tents – AK) tell you that if Israel hadn’t invested till today almost 100 billion dollars in the settlements, maybe the situation would be better here?

Bennet: Rubbish. Our presence in Judea and Samaria prevents bombings in Rothschild boulevard. The economy in Israel was in the dumps before the IDF went back into Judea and Samaria in Operation Defensive Shield.

Verter: That was the IDF, not families of settlers.

Bennet: If we leave Judea and Samaria the economy will crash. There will be missiles on Tel Aviv. As long as there is Jewish settlement in Judea and Samaria, the State of Israel is safer and her economy more stable.

Talk about la la land…

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  • COMMENTS

    1. Ben Israel

      What Bennett says is absolutely true. The presence of Jewish civilian settlement in Judea/Samaria strengthens the security of the region and gives the IDF more freedom of movement by keeping the roads travelled and open and secure. And its primary benefit is that it shows that Israel is strong and confident and not going to capitulate as Arafat was led to think during the Oslo years, leading him to believe that a suicide bombing campaign would bring Israel to its knees.

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    2. Michelle

      @Ben Israel: That’s what is most important– that the IDF has freedom of movement.

      In La La land, it is more important for the occupying power’s army to have freedom of movement, as this ensures that the natives are forbidden their right to freedom of movement. In La La land, a brutal colonial system– not a strong and liberal democracy–is what points to Israel’s strength and confidence.

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    3. Ben Israel

      Michelle-
      Were the Palestinians willing to sign and actually carry out a compromise peace agreement with Israel, then you would be right. But there is no possibility of this happening. The Palestinian are not prepared to make peace with Israel on ANY terms. Thus, continuance of the current situation is the only option, with the hope of a real UNOFFICIAL modus-vivendi eventually evolving. In that case, the Israeli security presence could be reduced if not almost elmininated entirely.
      Several weeks ago, Amira Hass wrote in Ha’aretz something to the effect that the Palestinian Authority has given up trying to arrest the perpertators of the murder of Juliano Mer-Khamis. He was killed in the Jenin refugee camp. I take this as an indication that, in spite of improvement in the security of the citizenry of the Palestinian urban areas since Arafat’s death (before that there was a truly chaotic situation where, for example, armed gangs from the Balata refugee camp terrorized the population of Shechem [Nablus]) the Palestinian Authority still is afraid to exert its authority against armed gangs in various places throughout the West Bank. If I am right, then the Palestinian Authority is certainly not going to stick its neck out and make the “traitorous concession” (e.g. giving up the “Right of Return” of the refugees) to make peace. This is without even mentioning the HAMAS-Gaza problem. Thus, we all have to make the best of the current situation.

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    4. Louis

      So among other things, Bennett is happy to place use Israeli civilians (including thousands upon thousands of children), (i.e. settlers) as defensive obstacles to violence in Israel itself… just goes to show the total disregard of everything that the settlement movement represents…

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    5. Ben Israel

      Louis-
      What do you think the state is doing by maintaining civilian settlements on dangerous borders like the Gaza region and the Lebanese border? What about the early halutzim who drained the swamps and exposed themselves to malaria, drought, famine and attacks by the Arabs? They are considered heroes today. They built the state, just as the settlers are doing today.

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    6. Michael W.

      Ben Israel, I don’t understand how having civilians in a war zone make the rest of us safe. Don’t some settlements require one-to-one ratio of soldier to settler? That doesn’t sound very efficient. The settlements scramble the line of defense. The IDF would be able to respond to Palestinian attacks more easily if they didn’t have to also protect Israeli civilians in Judea & Samaria.

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    7. @Ben – good comparison. Especially since the settlers aren’t on the border, but behind it. I wish it were that way, though…

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    8. Deïr Yassin

      Ben Israel (or whatever he calls himself on other blogs) is saying that the settlers are building the State. I deduce that our American immigrant (another !) is a partisan of Eretz Israel, and thus the ‘Palestinians belong in Jordan’-mantra. Or does he have some kind of subaltern ‘goyimitude’ for them in his dreams ?
      If anybody could explain to me the difference between the ideology of Erezt Israel and “the Jews into the Sea”. A part from the first expelling the Palestinian natives, and the second expelling Jews, some of whom such as Ben Israel, are recent settlers.

      If the settlers and the settlements didn’t exist, I wonder how the State of Israel would manage to steal the 83% of the water in the West Bank though, much of it deviated into Israel proper.

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    9. Stavvmc

      Apart from being morally repugnant, Ben Israel’s argument is logically inconsistent. Please educate yourself by reading this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palestine_Papers . @Deir Yassin, it’s ironic that the hard right settlers may end up coalescing a moderate center that find common cause in realistic, economically sound policies and understand the futility of a zero-sum game ideology.

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    10. Danny

      @Deir Yassin:
      Ben Israel is clearly an immigrant into Israel (I assume American, since he seems to know a lot of American politics), probably religious and most certainly right wing (though from his posts I believe he’s not of the extreme variety). My theory about the olim (immigrants to Israel) is that they are almost all right wingers with a mix of religious and ideological fervor, which would explain why they are coming to Israel at a time when many Israelis wish to be going the other way (i.e. yordim, or immigrant out of Israel). One reason for that is their desire to not live among gentiles, which would explain their intense dislike of Arabs. While they are generally good people with family values who have, for the most part, made a positive contribution to Israel, they are nonetheless hindering Israel’s ability to make peace with the Palestinians.

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    11. Bosko

      @Danny – I thought we are here to discuss issues and topics. We bring our opinions, for better or for worse. Who we are as individuals is irrelevant. At most we can agree to disagree.
      Now here is my opinion … First: The figure of $100 billion as the cost of the settlements is a gross over estimate. Haaretz estimated that the overall past costs to build the settlements was $17 billion.
      http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/news/settlements-have-cost-israel-17-billion-study-finds-1.265190
      Those are sunk costs. Of course there are ongoing security costs too. But those who would argue that those ongoing costs could be saved by withdrawal, must prove to the rest of us sceptics that peace would ensue as a result and that terrorism will cease. Otherwise those ongoing costs would still exist except that they would be incurred to stop rockets and attacks on Israel’s main population centres.
      By the way, there would be additional costs of relocating the “settlers” of more than $17 billion. Not to mention the social upheavals …

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    12. Has anyone bothered to calculate what is the cost to Palestinians of the settler theft of their lands and resources?

      Israel owes, and this obscene settler in his cloud of inverted reality, acts as its proxy con merchant, assisting to obscure the mounting Israel’s debt to Palestinian people, its hideous brutal Occupation and ongoing heist.

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    13. Ben Israel

      Deir Yassin or SHIRIN (the other name you use)-
      Amir Peretz is an immigrant to Israel, just like I am, but he is from Morocco, and active in Shalom Achshav (Peace Now). He lives on the settlement of Sederot which is under bombardment by the peaceful HAMAS people of Gaza. Is he more of an Israeli than I am? At least the house I live in is on privately owned Jewish land purchased in the 1890′s, so it is not “stolen Arab land” like Peretz’s is.

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    14. Deïr Yassin

      @ Ben Israel
      I’m very flattered that you compare me with Shirin, really. She has an amazing historical knowledge that I would love to possess. And I’m immensely flattered that you compare my English skills with hers – maybe you should actually change your glasses.
      Shirin is an American citizen, she’s NOT of Palestinian origin, and she’s far older than me. She followed the ’67-war on the radio from New York, I wasn’t even born.
      A part from that, you’re right …. we probably share some common ideology. You know that, “all-Arabs-look-and-think-alike”-stuff.
      Once again: I’m so flattered. You just made my day.
      I don’t care whether the land was privately owned or not. Private land possession doesn’t give the right to create a State. And I’ve heard that the Jews owned around 7% of the land in Palestine in 1947…
      But that’s maybe why the JNF has taken over private owned Arab land: they’re afraid that my brothers are going to declare an independant Palestinian state in the Galilee.

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    15. Ben Israel

      You two use exactly the same language and propaganda techniques…Arabs never use violence, Samir Kuntar must be innocent, the Palestinians are now and always have been peaceful, etc, etc. Oddly enough, Shirin dispappeared at exactly the same time you showed up.

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    16. Bosko

      @Jin- “Has anyone bothered to calculate what is the cost to Palestinians of the settler theft of their lands and resources?”
      Yes, it is very costly to Palestinian Arabs too. That’s why they should not have tried to prevent the Palestinian Jews quest for self determination by waging war, to this day, against them. Instead, the Palestinian Arabs should have established their own state side by side with the Jewish state.
      Waging war IS costly. And the debt is owed by the side that started the war and who still refuses to reach compromise solutions to end the war. Or are you going to pretend that Hamas is playing anything other than a zero sum game?

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    17. Bosko

      @Deir Yassin – “And I’ve heard that the Jews owned around 7% of the land in Palestine in 1947…”
      Most land in 1947 was crown land. Neither Jews nor Arabs owndd most of the land. So what was this crown land? It was land owned by the state. In 1947, the state was represented by the British Mandate. And before 1917, for about 400 years, it was the Ottoman Turks. Neither of those were Arabs. So why would Arabs have the right to expect that all the state land belongs to them and only them when there were two peoples in Palestine in 1947? Two peoples, Arabs AND Jews, not just Arabs …

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    18. Ben Israel

      Bosko-
      Add to that the fact that Arab independence in the Middle East was given to them by the thousands of Britisih soldiers who died in to enable the Ottoman Empire to fall. The Arabs didn’t have to even lift a finger in order to receive this present.

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    19. Danny

      @Bosko:
      While you are right that both peoples have a right to the land, only one is native to the land and the region, and that is the Palestinians. The Jews do deserve a homeland but not at the expense of the Palestinians, who have lived there for centuries before the first Jews even thought about emigrating to Palestine in the latter part of the 19th century. I think if Israel recognized these facts and respected the rights of Palestinians to live on their native soil, peace would happen much more naturally and smoothly. As of today, Israel has NEVER recognized Palestinians rights in Palestine.

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    20. Mitchell Cohen

      “The Jews do deserve a homeland but not at the expense of the Palestinians, who have lived there for centuries before the first Jews even thought about emigrating to Palestine in the latter part of the 19th century.” [End of Danny]

      @Danny, so you are denying that there were Jews here before the latter part of the 19th century. Congratulations, you are the flip side of the coin from Joan Peters. Nor did the Jewish immigrants to Palestine “displace” anybody:

      http://www.mideastweb.org/palpop.htm

      “Zionist settlement between 1880 and 1948 did not displace or dispossess Palestinians. Every indication is that there was net Arab immigration into Palestine in this period, and that the economic situation of Palestinian Arabs improved tremendously under the British Mandate relative to surrounding countries. By 1948, there were approximately 1.35 million Arabs and 650,000 Jews living between the Jordan and the Mediterranean, more Arabs than had ever lived in Palestine before, and more Jews than had lived there since Roman times. Analysis of population by sub-districts shows that Arab population tended to increase the most between 1931 and 1948 in the same areas where there were large proportions of Jews. Therefore, Zionist immigration did not displace Arabs. For a detailed discussion that focuses on this myth, please refer to Zionism and its Impact.” [End of quote from link]

      “I think if Israel recognized these facts and respected the rights of Palestinians to live on their native soil, peace would happen much more naturally and smoothly. As of today, Israel has NEVER recognized Palestinians rights in Palestine.” [End of Danny]

      Well, wasn’t that the point of the Partition Plan and every other attempt at a two-state solution ever since?

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    21. Bosko

      @Danny – We disagree. In 1947, the Jewish Yishuv agreed to the two state solution. The Arabs were the ones who rejected it.
      After 1967 Israel kept on asking their Arab neighbours to recognise it’s existence and make peace. This was rejected until Sadat. After which indeed Israel withdrew in exchange for peace.
      In 2000/2001 Ehud Barak offered a specific solution which would have resulted in aPalestinian Arab state side by side with Israel. And what was his reward? The Intifada and Durban.
      In 2008 Ehud Olmert offered a similar solution. What did he get? Deafening silence.

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    22. Deïr Yassin

      Mitchell Cohen links to Mideastweb (not a totally unbiased source to be polite) who presents different points of view on the Palestinian population and it’s increase prior to 1948. He quotes exactly the point of view that suits his agenda: that Arabs came rushing into Palestine after the Zionists came from Europe.
      Why didn’t he quote some of the work of the American historian Justin McCarthy, also presented on this website, and other historians who claim that the rise in the population in Palestine was due to social-economic changes in the Eastern Mediterranean that had nothing to do with the Zionist presence in Palestine. Or others who claim that there was nothing more than a natural increase.

      BOSKO’s Hasbara is just as transparent as Naftali Bennet’s. That ‘generous offer’-mantra has been debunked by dozens of people, also Israeli officials:
      Shlomo Ben-Ami, Israeli Foreign Minister and key negociator at Camp David:
      “Camp David was not the missed opportunity for the Palestinians, and if I were Palestinian, I would have rejected Camp David as well”
      Bosko has already told us that Palestinians are violent ‘by nature’. He also thinks we’re stupid. Wonder where he got that from:
      http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/aug/07/israeli-school-racism-claim

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    23. Mitchell Cohen

      @DY, the site I linked to seems pretty objective to me. They are VERY critical of Joan Peters and even link to your favorite site (electricintifada). The site stresses that Palestine was NOT empty when the Jewish pioneers started coming. YOU, on the other hand would want to deny that there were Jews in Palestine before the 2nd half of the 19th century and that the Arab owned ALL of Palestine, which is FAR from true. They owned the land their villages were on, not all of Mandatory Palestine (NOBODY did). So, you are just the EXACT opposite of those who would claim, “a land w/o people for a people w/o a land”….

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    24. Danny

      “Nor did the Jewish immigrants to Palestine “displace” anybody”
      .
      Ahem… now that is some statement! Israel has been displacing the Palestinians pretty much since 1948, and this is still going on this very day (just go to Sheik Jarrah to see Jewish settlers displacing native Palestinians right out of their homes!!!) As I said, Israel has NEVER recognized that Palestinians have rights in Israel/Palestine too – it’s only Jews who have real rights to the land. Denying that is pure blindness.

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    25. Danny

      @Bosko:
      “In 2008 Ehud Olmert offered a similar solution. What did he get? Deafening silence.”
      .
      Actually, Wikileaks showed exactly who gave whom the deafening silence treatment. Poor Palestinian “negotiator” Saeb Erekat pretty much lost all his credibility because of all the concessions he agreed to, which Livni summarily REJECTED! And Camp David 2000 was a complete disaster from start to finish, with Barak being his disgusting self (we all know the man a little better today, so I do not blame Arafat one bit for deciding to go home rather than continue to talk with this corrupt man).

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    26. Deïr Yassin

      @ Mitchell Cohen
      “[MidEastWeb] seems pretty objective to me”
      Yeah, I doubt you would recogize Zionist propaganda if you came across it. It’s an Israeli NGO, and you just take a look at the board, count the number of Arabs and you’ll see whether it’s objective. Still, you only quoted what suits you. Why didn’t you look into the different demographic surveys ? The population of Palestine pre-1922 is very difficulr to establish with any certainty, though the Ottoman Empire had a very developped administration. Many Palestinians, particularly Muslims, but later on also Christians, did not register their male children due to military service in the Ottoman Army. In fact, male members of my own family started migrating temporarily to Latin America due to the Ottoman military service. Zionism later accelerated that migration that became irreversible
      “You on the other hand would want to deny that there were Jews in Palestine before the 2nd half of the 19th century”
      I don’t like that negationistic anathema. I’ve NEVER stated such a think,I know it’s not the case, and don’t mix me up with other people.
      I think Danny said that. I’m not Danny, and I’m NOT responsible for what other people write here.
      I know of course that there has always been a Jewish presence in whatever you call that place between the river and the sea, I also know that the massive expulsion of the Jews after the destruction of the temple is a myth, that only the urban classes left, that the peasantry stayed, were later Arabized, Christianized and/or Islamised, and that present day Palestinians have a huge ‘genetic stock’ going back to the Hebrew of that time.
      Yitzhak Zvi wrote about that, so did Israel Belkind. I also know that many Jews who came to Israel under the Law of Return have no ‘genetic’ link with the area, that the Palestinians have been waiting since 1948 for the implementation of the resolution 194, as promised before the UN General Assembly by Abba Eban in May 1949……

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    27. Deïr Yassin

      Erratum: Yitzhak BEN-Zvi, of course, historian, and the 2nd president of the State of Israel.

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    28. Bosko

      @Danny – You say the Palestinian Arabs made concessions in 2008? How do you explain this then?
      “Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas on Monday denied offering secret concessions to Israel and said that reporting of purportedly leaked documents had presented Israeli positions as those of his own negotiators”
      http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacy-defense/abbas-concessions-in-palestine-papers-came-from-israel-not-us-1.338882
      And about Camp David/Taba in 2000/2001, whom did President Bill Clinton blame for the failure, Ehud Barak or Arafat?
      “Clinton blamed Arafat after the failure of the talks, stating, “I regret that in 2000 Arafat missed the opportunity to bring that nation into being”
      http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2000_Camp_David_Summit
      @Deir Yassin – Let me guess, it’s all just Hasbara. Right?

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    29. Danny

      Bosko, I’m surprised at you (you seem like a sharp guy). Of course Abbas will claim that the wikileaks are liars, since it’s a huge embarrassment for him and his “negotiators” (as I said, Saeb Erekat’s reputation is all but destroyed). And you know what, I tend to belive wikileaks much more than I do either the Palestinian or the Israeli government! As for Clinton and his endorsement of Israel in Camp David in 2000… well, considering that he got some bakshish out of the Marc Rich pardon deal that was concocted by Barak, and he wanted to ensure his wife’s Senate seat out of Jew-heavy New York state, I would say he had rather strong conflicts of interest during this time.

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    30. Bosko

      @Danny – Hold on there for a minute. Can you please explain to me what is so embarassing about making concessions? Personally, I expect the Israeli government to make concessions for the sake of peace. So Please explain to me why would Erekat’s “concessions” would destroy his reputation? Don’t the Palestinian Arab people want to reach a peace deal with Israel so they can have their own state?

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    31. Deïr Yassin

      @ Bosko
      For God sake ! You don’t think I’m going to read a wikipedia-page on Camp David.
      You really want me to repost that video from the Yesha on ‘Zionist Editing Wikipedia’ ?
      Some recomendations on Camp David and the myth of the ‘generous offer’:
      Charles Enderlin, French-Israeli journalist, a huge book with enormous insider knowledge. By many considered the best account of Camp David
      http://books.google.com/books/about/Shattered_dreams.html?id=a3XfsUSR0yUC
      Or Robert Malley, member of the American delegation:
      http://www.nytimes.com/2001/07/08/opinion/fictions-about-the-failure-at-camp-david.html
      Robert Malley and Hussein Agha:
      http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2001/aug/09/camp-david-the-tragedy-of-errors/

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    32. Bosko

      @Danny – Ok let’s pretend that Bill Clinton was just a stooge, that he didn’t force Ehud Barak to make major concessions (which of course he did) and that he wrongly blamed Arafat for the failure of the peace talks.
      Even then, do you think what happened subsequently was justified? Was the Intifada justified? Was Durban justified? Wouldn’t it have been more appropriate for Arafat to continue the negotiations and perhaps make a counter offer? Was the Intifada the right answer? Was Durban the right answer?

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    33. Bosko

      @Deir Yassin – Have it your way. How about the BBC? Are they a good enough source for you? Here is their quote of Bill Clinton and what he says about Arafat in his memoirs …
      “He just cannot believe that the Palestinian leader turned down the offer of a state in almost all the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem. He calls this refusal ” a colossal mistake”
      And here is more …
      “”Right before I left office, Arafat thanked me for all my efforts and told me what a great man I was. ‘Mr Chairman,’ I replied, ‘I am not a great man. I am a failure, and you have made me a failure.’”
      http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3829107.stm
      If you don’t believe even the BBC, maybe you should buy Clinton’s book, I have and it’s definitely all there …. Sigh ….

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    34. Mitchell Cohen

      @DY, call the link I provided what you want, but within that link is another link (to one of YOUR favorite sites): electronicintifada.net/historicalmyths/nosuchthing.html
      Below this link is a table (which I cannot reproduce here), but suffice to say, the population of Arabs in 1870 was 367,224 and 1,237,000 in 1946. So the population of Arabs practically quadrupled in that period. Now, I have never claimed that a large percentage were immigrants (although probably some were). However, to say that the Zionist pioneers “displaced” Arabs does not seem to have a basis in reality even according to your favorite site.
      “I also know that the massive expulsion of the Jews after the destruction of the temple is a myth” [End of quote]
      This claim does not hold water in lieu of recent archeological and DNA studies.
      “I also know that many Jews who came to Israel under the Law of Return have no ‘genetic’ link with the area” [End of quote by Deir Yassin] I hope you are not talking about the long disgraced “Khazar Theory” that most Ashkenazic Jews are supposedly descended form Khazar converts to Judaism. Because this theory has been long disproved and even the author of “The Thirteenth Tribe” Arthur Kosethler has admitted that he promoted this theory to shield fellow Jews from anti-semitism by discrediting the concept of a Jewish race. DNA studies have blown this theory out of the sea: http://www.khazaria.com/khazar-diaspora.html “Are all Jews around the world descended from the Khazars? Certainly not. East European Jewish ancestry originates substantially from ancient Judea, and the same is true of most other modern Jewish populations (with the exception of groups like Libyan Jews and Ethiopian Jews). But, it is rational to conclude that some Jews also have some Khazar ancestors.” [End of quote from above link]
      So, anyone who still takes this theory seriously should be even more embarrassed then one who quotes from “From Time Immemorial”. “Palestinians have been waiting since 1948 for the implementation of the resolution 194, as promised before the UN General Assembly by Abba Eban in May 1949……” [End of Deir Yassin] It’s a two way streak. Danny’s post about wikileaks and Saeb Erakat being “embarrassed” by Erakat’s “concession” proves my POV more than yours. Except for Sadat and King Hussein of Jordan, the Arabs have pretty much rejected peace with Israel since 1948.

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    35. Bosko

      @Deir Yassin – “Bosko has already told us that Palestinians are violent ‘by nature’”
      Those were not MY words. Those are your words. That’s not what I said and you know that’s not what I said.
      Now if you repeat this canard once more, I will just have to call you what you are.
      By the way, what did YOU call Zionists? You called us colonists. And didn’t you claim that even the babies of colonists are fair game?

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    36. Deïr Yassin

      @ BOSKO
      You’re free to believe in that “generous offer”-myth, after all the Israeli PR created it.

      @ MITCHELL
      Listen: if you want to communitcate with me, stick to my comments. Where did I talk about ‘Zionist pioneers displaced Arabs”. I don’t have in memory having stated such a thing, and I don’t think I did. I’m aware that the Zionist displacement started mainly after the UN vote in nov ’47. Landowners, often absentees, displaced Palestinian fellahin when they sold land to the Zionists, yes, but I’ve never stated what you pretend.
      Now to my “favorite site”: I’ve linked to electronicintifada’ ONCE,(though I do like it) and only to link to a declaration which had nothing to do with EI. So cut the crap !
      Before starting out on your Khazar- thesis. Where did I talk about that ?
      Are you contesting that people have converted to Judaism, thus became Jews, and thus have no ‘genetic’ link to Israel ? That Anastassia Michaeli-thing telling Hanin Zoabi to go off to Gaza is one of the most revolting exemples.
      I have read various studies saying that between 300.000 and 400.000 Russians in Israel have no link neither to Judaism nor to the Jewish people. And I’m sorry, when I see tall blond Scandinavian or German looking people claiming this is ‘their ancestral homeland’, I know some interbreeding happened during these 2000 years, and if a religious or cultural link is enough, then an African Christian has the same claim to Jerusalem. I’ve even heard that Jerusalem is mentioned more times in the Bible than in the Torah (cf. one of the major Hasbara talking-points about ‘Jerusalem not mentioned in the Koran’ – who cares !).
      And here a story I first heard about while in Peru. I didn’t believe it at the time:
      http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2002/aug/07/israel1
      but then European travellers have before claimed that the Amerindians were a lost Jewish tribe :-)
      All this is simply hilarious, people claimng this was their land 2000 years ago. So what ? And your long speech about DNA just shown once again that Zionism is using the Nürnberger Laws and the German obsession for everything genetic. Rather saying, isn’t it ?
      One of these days, I’ll tell you that story of my forefather in the Galilee who received YOUR forefather when he came from Irak. What was his name ? Oh, yes, Abraham.

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    37. Deïr Yassin

      @ Bosko
      If there was an inernal serach system on this bog I would find your quote on Palestinian violence, but I really don’t have the courage to go though all threads, and read your comments once more. One time is more than enough.
      And your anathema about the ‘babies of colonists are fair game” is just one more proof that you’re a pathetic LIAR. I’ve said many time that no matter what, killing children has NO excuses. And I’ve also asked that Israelis condemn the killing of Palestinian babies. I don’t remember your answer.
      So I won’t waste my time with you anymore. BDS on Bosko !

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    38. Deir Yassin

      Errata: ‘internal research system’.
      I’m not drunk ! It must be the ramadhân :-)

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    39. Mitchell Cohen

      “Now to my “favorite site”: I’ve linked to electronicintifada’ ONCE,(though I do like it) and only to link to a declaration which had nothing to do with EI. So cut the crap !” [End of Deir Yassin] Well, you do seem pretty picky about which sites you accept as “objective”. Before starting out on your Khazar- thesis. Where did I talk about that ?
      “Are you contesting that people have converted to Judaism, thus became Jews, and thus have no ‘genetic’ link to Israel ? That Anastassia Michaeli-thing telling Hanin Zoabi to go off to Gaza is one of the most revolting exemples.” [End of Deir Yassin] Nope, I have never denied there have been converts to Judaism. YOU are the one who brought up the claim about whether or not Jews have “genetic links” to this land. However, the overwhelming majority of Jews the world over are genetically linked.
      “I’ve even heard that Jerusalem is mentioned more times in the Bible than in the Torah (cf. one of the major Hasbara talking-points about ‘Jerusalem not mentioned in the Koran’ – who cares !)” [End of Deir Yassin] Of course Jerusalem is mention more times in the Bible than in the Torah. The Torah is PART OF the Bible (known to Jews as “Tanach”).
      “All this is simply hilarious, people claimng this was their land 2000 years ago. So what ? And your long speech about DNA just shown once again that Zionism is using the Nürnberger Laws and the German obsession for everything genetic. Rather saying, isn’t it ?” [End of Deir Yassin] This is not about whether or not this was our land 2,000 years ago, but about Jews having never left the land (even if they were a minority in it for centuries) and having a historical (and, yes, religious connection to it). YOU might think it’s ridiculous, but the British Mandate and the UN did not. And, YOU are the one who brought in the “genetic link” into the discussion. On the one hand, you want to claim many Jews don’t have a “genetic link” to this area, but then when I show respectable research that DOES prove that most Jews in the world DO have the link then you cry, “Zionism is racism, based on Nuremberg Laws, etc. etc.” At any rate, if Zionism was STRICTLY about race, then the Law of Return would not accept any converts like your favorite, Anastassia Michaeli. So you can’t have your cake and eat it. At any rate, I will put aside our differences for a moment and wish you an easy fast. I am fasting today as well, but only for 25 hours. So, hats off to you for fasting for a whole month (especially in the summer)!!!!

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    40. Bosko

      @Deir Yassin – I won’t be crude and label you anything. You know what you are, I’ll leave it at that.
      Now these are the exact words that I said …
      “First: I don’t believe that the Palestinian Arabs are inately cruel. But at this juncture, because of generations of incitement by cynical leaders, and because of our history in which their side is not lilly white innocent, nor is ours, simply put, they hate us. You can shut your eye to that but it won’t make the facts go away. When I say THEY, I don’t mean all of them but I do mean most of them”
      I said that in response to an earlier comment for which I was accused that I label the Palestinian Arabs as inately hateful which of course I did not. Be it as it may, the fact that I was willing to say the above, should have layed the matter to rest because if I would feel that ALL Palestinian Arabs are haters, I would just say it and leave it at that.
      Now I said what I said about you was also based on an actual interchange. If you want, I will find it. But since you say that you don’t condone making even Zionist babies fair game, I’ll accept you at face value. As long as you don’t play the labeling game with me. Otherwise you too will be fair game. After all, some of the things you say have plenty of ambiguity in them and I too can interpret it in nasty ways in the same way that you have been doing with me a couple of times now …

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