+972 Magazine » News http://972mag.com Independent commentary and news from Israel & Palestine Fri, 31 Oct 2014 11:32:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8 Photographed punching an Arab woman? Sue the photographer http://972mag.com/photographed-punching-an-arab-woman-sue-the-photographer/98152/ http://972mag.com/photographed-punching-an-arab-woman-sue-the-photographer/98152/#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 11:30:42 +0000 http://972mag.com/?p=98152 A freelance photographer who documented three young Jewish women attacking an Arab woman in Jerusalem is being sued for defamation after Israel’s most popular television news channel published her photos. Now she is asking for the public’s help to fund her legal defense.

By Oren Persico / ‘The 7th Eye

The incident in Jerusalem, as photographed by Dorit Jordan-Dotan. (Screenshot from the fundraising campaign.)

The incident in Jerusalem, as photographed by Dorit Jordan-Dotan. (Screenshot from the fundraising campaign.)

Dorit Jordan-Dotan, who last year photographed a group of Jewish women attacking an Arab woman in Jerusalem, launched a campaign last week to fund her legal defense; the Jewish women whom she documented in the scuffle are suing her for NIS 300,000 (roughly $80,000) in damages. Under the banner, “Political lawsuit against freedom of expression,” Jordan-Dotan is asking for the public’s help — through an Israeli website similar to Kickstarter — in funding her legal defense. At the time of writing, she had raised over two-thirds of the requested amount (NIS 30,000).

In February 2013, Jordan-Dotan, an independent documentary photographer, saw a scuffle break out at the Kiryat Moshe light rail station in Jerusalem. She picked up her camera and documented what she saw. According to the three plaintiffs, Shafra Richter, Ruth Meshulami and Chen Alfas, who are being represented by Attorney Doron Nir-Zvi, Jordan-Dotan caused them great harm by distributing the photos in which they can be seen striking the Arab woman, “without putting forth the photographs from when the incident began, from which it would be possible to see that the plaintiffs were defending themselves against the same Arab woman.” According to them, Jordan-Dotan “provided the deceptive photographs to media outlets that distorted reality, whereas the light rail security cameras show that it was actually the Arab woman who started the skirmish.”

Another claim of theirs touches on the fact that Jordan-Dotan did not blur the young Jewish women’s faces, despite the fact that they were minors at the time of the incident, and she therefore committed a criminal offense and violated their privacy. The plaintiffs also claim that in an interview to Channel 2 News, Jordan-Dotan said that the Arab woman was the victim of an attack, which they claim, is contrary to reality. Channel 2 News is also being sued by the three women.

On behalf of his clients, Attorney Nir-Zvi demanded in Jerusalem Magistrate’s Court that each of his three clients be compensated NIS 100,000 (roughly $26,000). Additionally, he asked that Jordan-Dotan and Channel 2 News be ordered to “destroy all of the publications and photographs relating to the plaintiffs that exist on the Internet.”

From the archives: Press freedom in Israel

Through her attorney, Yadin Elam, Jordan-Dotan filed her response to the suit last week. According to her, she documented the violent incident that she saw and passed along the documentation to media outlets in good faith. She added that she did not witness the start of the scuffle and did not document that part of the confrontation. She passed along all of the photos in her possession to media outlets, she emphasized, without any selection or filtering on her part. According to Jordan-Dotan, she did not know and could not have known what the plaintiffs’ ages were, and the moment that she was made aware that they were minors at the time of the incident, she removed those photos in which their faces could be seen.

According to Jordan-Dotan, the lawsuit was filed against her is a frivolous suit designed “to send a clear, tough and threatening message to anyone who in the future may find themselves in the defendant’s shoes — who sees such an incident and dares to give their photos, testimony and impressions to a journalist.”

“After the photos were published in the media, the defendant suffered mudslinging and slander attacks, including threats and insults via email and Faceook as well as responses in newspapers,” Jordan-Dotan says. Attorney Itamar Ben-Geir, who was representing the plaintiffs at the time, even raised the possibility that Jordan-Dotan herself was part of a conspiracy with the Arab woman who was attacked. In light of that claim of defamation, Jordan-Dotan is demanding counter-damages of NIS 100,000 (roughly $26,000) from the plaintiffs.

“It is incumbent upon the plaintiffs to take up their claims about the publication with the publishers, and not with the defendant,” Jordan-Dotan added.

Photographer Dorit Jordan-Dotan being interviewed on Channel 2 News about the incident she documented, February 26, 2013. (Screenshot)

Photographer Dorit Jordan-Dotan being interviewed on Channel 2 News about the incident she documented, February 26, 2013. (Screenshot)

Channel 2 News claims, through its attorneys Yishgav Nakdimon and Dakela Biran, that the reports which it published about the incident were “truthful reports based on photographic evidence of the incident — that took place in a public space — and about the police investigation that was opened into it.” Channel 2 added that in doing so it was — legally — carrying out “its journalistic and public duty to publish materials of public interest.”

Channel 2 goes on to argue that, “the photos that were published in the news reports speak for themselves and prove that the young Jewish women photographed in them, attacked the Arab woman and struck her with their hands.”

“The reason that the attack began is of no importance,” Channel 2 News argued. “And even if the physical attack shown in the pictures was provoked somehow by the Arab woman, that does not lessen the severity of the young women’s violent response, which is shown in the photos.”

Channel 2 News also claims that there is nothing in its report that could defame the plaintiffs. In addition, the company’s counsel emphasized, its employees did not know that the photographed women were minors at the time of publication.

In its response to the suit, Channel 2 News points out that it removed from its website — “Mako” — the interview with Jordan-Dotan as well as another report on the incident, without admitting to any of the claims against it. In addition, the company wrote, it blurred the faces of the Jewish women in other articles that remain on its website. However, the Channel 2 interview with Jordan-Dotan from immediately after the incident remains available on the website of Channel 2 concessionaire “Reshet,” which also publishes material from Channel 2 News.

This article was first published in Hebrew by The 7th Eye media watchdog website. It is reproduced here with permission from the author.

Related:
A frightening new era of Jewish-Arab relations in Israel
Palestinian beaten by Jews in J’lem: ‘Attacks against us happen every day’
Press freedom in Israel: Democracy in the age of self-censorship

]]>
http://972mag.com/photographed-punching-an-arab-woman-sue-the-photographer/98152/feed/ 56
Israeli president’s apology offers a rare hope for coexistence http://972mag.com/president-commemorates-massacre-calls-for-equality-in-israel/98091/ http://972mag.com/president-commemorates-massacre-calls-for-equality-in-israel/98091/#comments Mon, 27 Oct 2014 17:10:31 +0000 http://972mag.com/?p=98091 With his unprecedented and heartfelt speech in Kafr Qassem commemorating the massacre there, President Rivlin has outlined a future of equality, respect and shared identity for Israelis and Palestinians alike.

Israeli President Reuven (Ruby) Rivlin visited the Palestinian town Kafr Qassem in the Triangle region of Israel on Monday to commemorate the massacre of 49 of its residents by Border Police in 1956. He was the first president to attend the formal memorial ceremony, and only the second president to visit, according to Haaretz.

After nearly 15 years of a severe deterioration in relations between Palestinians and Israeli Jews, the visit stood out as a good-will gesture rarely seen on the part of any Israeli leaders. During the vicious climate of the war over the summer, the Israeli public became more accustomed to its elected officials calling Arab citizens terrorists, traitors, and trojan horses and calling to boycott Arab businesses (shouldn’t this be made illegal?).

But even before the war, the previous Knesset passed laws targeting Arabs and debated mean-spirited bills; and the bigot Avigdor Liberman’s star has only risen. These developments topped a dark decade that began with the killing of 13 Arab citizens in October 2000 during demonstrations – a traumatic turning point in relations back then.

Israeli President Reuven Rivlin greets an Arab-Israeli elder during a memorial ceremony in honor of the Kafr Qassim massacre October 26, 2014, held in the Arab-Israeli town Kfar Qassem. (photo: Yotam Ronen/Activestills.org)

Israeli President Reuven Rivlin greets an Arab-Israeli elder during a memorial ceremony in honor of the Kafr Qassim massacre October 26, 2014, held in the Arab-Israeli town Kfar Qassem. (photo: Yotam Ronen/Activestills.org)

The Kafr Qassem massacre in 1956 took place amidst escalation on the eastern border with Jordan and the start of the Sinai campaign. A curfew on Arab towns in the Triangle area – much of the Arab population lived under military rule from 1949-1966 – was changed from 9 p.m. to 5 p.m. Anyone violating the order was to be shot. Many of the residents were farmers were out working their fields when the change to the curfew was announced. Military personnel in the other towns realized that residents would be unaware of the new curfew time and concluded that the order was not logical. But in Kafr Qassem, Border Police soldiers opened fire, murdering 49 unarmed civilians returning from the fields.

This terrible chapter may have precipitated some progress. The state takes pride in the fact that Supreme Court Justice Benjamin Halevi tried the killers and set a legal precedent in Israel by decreeing that it is a soldier’s duty to refuse a “manifestly illegal order, on which the black flag of illegality flies.” Soldiers who carry them out can be tried; soldiers who refuse can draw on this as a legal defense. Further, some say the Kfar Qassem massacre hastened the end the military rule that Israel’s Arab minority lived under for the state’s first 18 years.

But such progress is heavily circumscribed, even schizophrenic. The duty to refuse is indeed a value in Israeli life, but in practice it is extremely complicated for a soldier to navigate in real time. Regarding the massacre itself, lengthy prison sentences for the key guilty parties were whittled down through bureaucratic and political decisions including, inexplicably, a presidential pardon. And it was another 10 long years before the military rule over Arab citizens ended.

Fifty-eight years later, the president’s visit was a symbolic sign of brotherhood. He said things I have longed to hear, particularly after years of vitriol from Israeli-Jewish political leaders.

The State of Israel has recognized the crime committed here. And rightly, and justly, has apologized for it. I too, am here today to say a terrible crime was done here… We must understand what occurred here. We must educate future generations about this difficult chapter, and the lessons which we learn from it.

This paragraph is for all intents and purposes an apology. The president’s emphasis on teaching future generations is a change from earlier attempts to hide the state’s crimes. Rivlin’s vision is a step away from the lie of false purity, and calls on Israel to confront its deeds head on. He went on:

I came here today, specifically during these difficult days to reach out my hand, in the belief that your hands are outstretched to me and to the Israeli Jewish public in turn. Friends. I hereby swear, in my name and that of all our descendants, that we will never act against the principle of equal rights, and we will never try and force someone from our land.

This statement pushes the bar from the “is” to the “ought;” it is, for once, a desirable vision for a way forward compared to the ills of the present.

Rivlin then said something rarely heard in Israel from the left or the right: he stated that this is also the homeland of Arab-Palestinians. In so doing, he addressed them not as a fifth column, newcomers or subjects, but as indigenous citizens and equals; as partners, not problems. In a nearly buried sentence, he made their identity part of the nation.

The State of Israel is the national home of the Jewish people, who returned to their land after two millennia of exile. This was its very purpose.

However, the State of Israel will also always be the homeland of the Arab population…The Arab population of the State of Israel is not a marginal group in Israeli society. We are talking about a population which is part and parcel of this land, a distinct population, with a shared national identity and culture, which will always be a fundamental component of Israel society… [emphasis mine].

And in a slapdown to the far-right, he legitimized the fact that they will not surrender their identity to embrace that of the people who conquered them:

…The Jewish public must understand that the ambition of so many to live alongside a Zionist Arab minority, which proudly sings the Hatikvah (Israel’s national anthem), will not, and cannot be realized.

The president even acknowledged some of the most sensitive tensions among Arabs in Israel: their commiseration with Palestinians under Israeli military occupation, racism and the daily scourge of discrimination of resources and opportunities in their own country.

I am aware that the establishment of the State of Israel was not the realization of a dream for the Arabs of this land. Many Israeli Arabs, forming part of the Palestinian people, feel the hurt and suffering of their brothers on the other side of the Green Line. Many of them experience not uncommon manifestations of racism and arrogance on the part of Jews.

…We must state plainly — the Israeli Arab population has suffered for years from discrimination in budget allocation, education, infrastructure, and industrial and trade areas. This is another obstacle on the road to building trust between us. A barrier which we must overcome.

These statements are close to perfect-pitch in terms of bold moral leadership, with a vision of an Israel that I can support.

But like the Kfar Qassem episode itself, the new president’s speech represented contradictions in his intentions, that marred the notion of real progress. Some of his words are sentiments that could actually perpetuate the very dynamics he hopes to shift.

Oddly, he called on the Arab citizens of Israel to renounce violence and terrorism and accused them of not doing so, although there hardly is any (nationalist) violence or terrorism in this community.

The Arab population in Israel, and the Arab leaders in Israel, must take a clear stand against violence and terrorism. All that live here, must today stand up and speak out against violence, against those who try to plunge us into the abyss. And I must tell you, this voice is not being heard. Neither clearly nor strongly enough.

It is understandable that the president was emotionally overwhelmed, having just attended the funeral of the three-month-old infant killed in a terror attack in Jerusalem last week. Practically during his visit, a second person died of injuries from that attack. As if a three-month-old is not horrible enough, this woman, a tourist, was just 22 years old.

Israeli President Reuven Rivlin speaking during a memorial ceremony in honor of the 1953 Kafr Qassim massacre October 26, 2014. (photo: Yotam Ronen)

Israeli President Reuven Rivlin speaking during a memorial ceremony in honor of the 1956 Kafr Qassem massacre October 26, 2014. (photo: Yotam Ronen)

But the implication that citizens of Israel are somehow linked to terror attacks by Palestinians under occupation (East Jerusalem Palestinians cannot be viewed in any other light, especially in recent months) is frankly absurd. It reinforces the idea that all Palestinians are the same – and all are terrorists.

The statement also makes me wince, coming after a summer when over 1,000 civilians, and not one, but hundreds of children were killed by Israel’s army. The war was an extension of a daily, systematic 47-year violent military occupation. By his logic, the president should implore Jewish Israelis to condemn the killing of innocents in Gaza.

Still, in a net assessment, I believe the president’s intentions are genuine, and it is high time that Israelis see some leadership from at least one corner of the country. He has laid out a path – not a perfect one – but at least broad outlines for a future of equality, respect and shared identity. The Israeli people and government must pave the road with policy.

Related:
Why the Left’s best president might come from the Right
For Palestinian citizens, 1956 massacre is not a distant memory
‘Bad apple’ narrative still rotten 57 years after Kafr Qasim Massacre

Newsletter banner 6 -540

]]>
http://972mag.com/president-commemorates-massacre-calls-for-equality-in-israel/98091/feed/ 20
Major Israeli construction company pulls out of settlement industry http://972mag.com/major-israeli-construction-company-pulls-out-of-settlement-industry/98089/ http://972mag.com/major-israeli-construction-company-pulls-out-of-settlement-industry/98089/#comments Mon, 27 Oct 2014 15:39:01 +0000 http://972mag.com/?p=98089 Israeli daily Yedioth Ahronoth reported Monday morning that Africa Israel Investments, an international holding and investment company based in Israel, will no longer build homes in the West Bank or East Jerusalem. This, after years that Africa Israel’s daughter company, Danya Cebus, has consistently built homes in settlements, contrary to international law.

There is no mistaking this decision. Lev Leviev, one of the most prominent tycoons in Israel, did not wake up one morning and understand, by chance, that the occupation is a terrible injustice toward millions of subjects who lack basic rights and who have been under our military rule for nearly 50 years. No. It took years. Years in which Leviev discovered that he could not continue building in the settlements while enjoying legitimacy in the international business world.

Settlement of Halamish, next to Nabi Saleh (Activestills)

Settlement of Halamish, next to Nabi Saleh (Activestills)

The opposition took the form of protests, pressure on the British government to cut business ties with Leviev, and divestment from his company. Between the profit he could make off the occupation and the profit he could lose in the rest of the world, Leviev chose the world.

This is another huge victory for the boycott movement and the activists who choose to fight against the occupation nonviolently. This is a victory for those who want to tell Israelis that even if the occupation is currently profitable, things can easily change. Africa Israel’s decision won’t stop the settlement enterprise, and its impact will likely be marginal. However, the message continues to permeate.

Related:
Figures show: Peace talks and settlement construction go hand in hand
What ‘painful concessions’ are left for Palestinians to make?

Newsletter banner 5 - 540

]]>
http://972mag.com/major-israeli-construction-company-pulls-out-of-settlement-industry/98089/feed/ 65
PHOTOS: Clashes follow funeral of 14-year-old Palestinian-American http://972mag.com/photos-clashes-follow-funeral-of-14-year-old-palestinian-american/98052/ http://972mag.com/photos-clashes-follow-funeral-of-14-year-old-palestinian-american/98052/#comments Sun, 26 Oct 2014 17:41:00 +0000 http://972mag.com/?p=98052 Orwah Hammad, the second American minor to be killed beyond the Green Line last week, was shot by Israeli soldiers. Thousands turn out for his funeral in the West Bank village of Silwad. In East Jerusalem Palestinians hold symbolic funeral for the man who ran down and killed an Israeli-American baby.

Palestinians shout slogans as they carry the body of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad at his funeral in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinians shout slogans as they carry the body of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad at his funeral in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Thousands of people attended the funeral of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad in the West Bank village of Silwad on Sunday.

Hammad was shot and killed by an Israeli soldier on Friday. His family told the AP that he was with a group of youths who were throwing stones at soldiers. Israel claims the teenager was about to throw a Molotov cocktail at Israeli traffic on a West Bank highway.

The funeral was postponed until Sunday to allow Hammad’s father to arrive from New Orleans. The U.S. State Department last week called for a “speedy and transparent” investigation into the boy’s death.

Mourners carry the body of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad at his funeral in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Mourners carry the body of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad at his funeral in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Women mourn as Palestinians carry the body of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad at his funeral in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Women mourn as Palestinians carry the body of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad at his funeral in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinians pray at the funeral of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad, in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinians pray at the funeral of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad, in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

The 14-year-old was the second American citizen to be killed beyond the Green Line last week. Three-month-old Israeli-American Chaya Zissel Braun was killed in an attack at an East Jerusalem light rail station Wednesday night.

A week earlier, Israeli troops shot and killed 12-year-old Palestinian Bahaa Samir Badr in the West Bank village of Beit Laqiya under nearly identical circumstances as Hammad’s death. His family on Sunday said they have video proving Badr was not involved in throwing Molotov cocktails or stones when Israeli soldiers shot him, according to Haaretz. The video has not been released publicly.

Clashes broke out between Palestinians and Israeli soldiers in Silwad following Hammad’s funeral Sunday afternoon.

A Palestinian youth is seen during clashes with the Israeli army following the funeral of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

A Palestinian youth is seen during clashes with the Israeli army following the funeral of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

An Israeli sniper aims his weapon at Palestinian youths during clashes with the Israeli army following the funeral of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

An Israeli sniper aims his weapon at Palestinian youths during clashes with the Israeli army following the funeral of 14-year-old Palestinian-American Orwah Hammad in the West Bank village of Silwad, October 26, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

In the Silwan neighborhood of East Jerusalem Sunday evening, Palestinians held a symbolic funeral march for Abdelrahman Shaloudy, who killed Chaya Zissel Braun and another woman with his car last week. Israeli police were still holding Shaloudy’s body and put restrictions on the number of participants and location of his funeral.

Shaloudy was shot by an Israeli policeman while trying to flee the scene of the attack and later died of his wounds.

Palestinians in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Silwan carry an empty coffin during a symbolic funeral for Abdelrahman Shaloudy, who killed a baby and another woman in Jerusalem after he rammed his vehicle into pedestrians, October 26, 2014. Shaludi died of his injuries after he was shot by police while trying to flee the scene. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinians in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Silwan carry an empty coffin during a symbolic funeral for Abdelrahman Shaloudy, who killed a baby and another woman in Jerusalem after he rammed his vehicle into pedestrians, October 26, 2014. Shaludi died of his injuries after he was shot by police while trying to flee the scene. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Police disperse a march in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Silwan. Palestinians carried an empty coffin in the symbolic funeral for Abdelrahman Shaloudy, who killed a baby and another woman in Jerusalem after he rammed his vehicle into pedestrians, October 26, 2014. Shaludi died of his injuries after he was shot by police while trying to flee the scene. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Police disperse a march in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Silwan. Palestinians carried an empty coffin in the symbolic funeral for Abdelrahman Shaloudy, who killed a baby and another woman in Jerusalem after he rammed his vehicle into pedestrians, October 26, 2014. Shaludi died of his injuries after he was shot by police while trying to flee the scene. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Police arrest a Palestinian youth as they disperse a march in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Silwan. Palestinians carried an empty coffin in the symbolic funeral for Abdelrahman Shaloudy, who killed a baby and another woman in Jerusalem after he rammed his vehicle into pedestrians, October 26, 2014. Shaludi died of his injuries after he was shot by police while trying to flee the scene. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Police arrest a Palestinian youth as they disperse a march in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Silwan. Palestinians carried an empty coffin in the symbolic funeral for Abdelrahman Shaloudy, who killed a baby and another woman in Jerusalem after he rammed his vehicle into pedestrians, October 26, 2014. Shaludi died of his injuries after he was shot by police while trying to flee the scene. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

Related:
PHOTOS: Right-wing protest demands ‘revenge,’ clashes in E. Jerusalem
Treat Palestinian killers like you treat Israeli killers
For the Israeli media, Gazan lives are little more than expendable

]]>
http://972mag.com/photos-clashes-follow-funeral-of-14-year-old-palestinian-american/98052/feed/ 17
Segregating the evening commute to the West Bank http://972mag.com/segregating-the-evening-commute-to-the-west-bank/98041/ http://972mag.com/segregating-the-evening-commute-to-the-west-bank/98041/#comments Sun, 26 Oct 2014 15:07:47 +0000 http://972mag.com/?p=98041 Jews and Palestinians who commute from the West Bank to work in central Israel each day will soon ride separate buses home. Let’s not give too much credit to Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon, however. The decision to segregate the evening commute wasn’t all that creative. He only completed his predecessors’ decision to segregate the morning commute.

Palestinian workers wait in line to board an Israeli bus line meant for Palestinians only after crossing the Eyal checkpoint from the West Bank into Israel proper. (Photo by Activestills.org)

Palestinian workers wait in line to board an Israeli bus line meant for Palestinians only after crossing the Eyal checkpoint from the West Bank into Israel proper. (Photo by Activestills.org)

It’s not really segregation. Not on paper at least. Or at least the paper doesn’t use the word “segregation.” In practice, however, people of one national origin will not be allowed to ride on the same bus lines as people of another national origin — for the benefit and at the request of one group, at the expense and against the desires of the other. Call that what you will.

Here’s how it works. Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Ya’alon, the de facto and de jure sovereign ruler of the West Bank, could have easily ordered his generals to revise Israeli military law to legally ban Palestinians from riding on the same buses as their Jewish Israeli neighbors. (It’s important to remember at this junction, no pun intended, that we are talking about two groups of people who live in the same place — the West Bank — and who each day commute back and forth to their workplaces in the same place — central Israel.)

If that military order had been issued so explicitly, however, it would actually be called segregation and understood to be segregation by the general public, which at least in theory, sometimes opposes segregation. If the defense minister had written such an order it probably would have even used the Hebrew word “hafrada,” which inconveniently means both separation and segregation. That wouldn’t have looked good. So Ya’alon found another way, one that didn’t require him to use such politically loaded words.

Read more on Palestinian laborers working in Israel

Instead, the defense minister ordered that Palestinian commuters return to their West Bank homes through a specific, dedicated checkpoint — a different checkpoint than the Jewish commuters with whom they shared their evening bus rides until now. Technically speaking, Palestinians with valid work permits are still allowed to ride Israeli buses; they just aren’t allowed to go through the checkpoints through which those buses pass. Which means they will have to travel a different route, and therefore, ride separate buses.

Let’s not give too much credit to Ya’alon, however. The decision to segregate the evening commute wasn’t all that creative. He was only completing his predecessors’ decision to segregate the morning commute.

See more photos of the segregated checkpoint here.

Palestinian workers board a new segregated bus line at the Eyal checkpoint, March 4, 2012.

Palestinian workers board a bus at the Eyal checkpoint, March 4, 2012. (Photo by Activestills.org)

On the sidelines of Ya’alon’s decision, an argument took place between two people in uniform about whether the segregation is necessitated — or even motivated — by security. According to Maj.-Gen. Nitzan Alon, who happens to be the commander in charge of the Israeli army’s entire operations in the West Bank (or in other words, the occupation), Palestinian and Israeli commuters sharing buses poses no security risk, Haaretz reported Sunday. Another man in uniform, one who apparently has neither name nor rank, declared that the only considerations in the new policy are security considerations. Go figure.

Don’t expect a huge fallout

The new policy will have only a couple of effects, neither of which are significant enough to endanger the two-state solution or move a single foreign government to change the course of their Mideast foreign policy.

First and foremost, the new segregated evening commute will do exactly what it was designed to: segregate the evening commute. Jewish settlers will be able to enjoy their ride home from Tel Aviv through the fertile West Bank foothills of Palestinian olive country without the annoyance of having to listen to other commuters speaking Arabic. Haaretz quoted MK Moti Yogev (The Jewish Home), a settler himself and member of the Israeli parliament’s ruling coalition, after riding one of the yet-to-be-segregated buses: “Riding these buses is unreasonable. They are full of Arabs.”

The second consequence is just slightly more politically correct, or less, depending on how you like your racism, civil rights and labor conditions. Palestinian laborers, who are forbidden from remaining inside Israel proper at night, will be forced to take longer routes home to their families every evening. Already, they arrive at the checkpoint before the crack of dawn in order to make it to work in the morning. Just another hardship of the occupation — nothing to write to the UN about.

As Amjad Iraqi wrote here on +972 when the morning buses were segregated last year:

This is certainly not the worst case of state-sanctioned discrimination in the Occupied Territories, and it won’t be the last. What makes the bus case notable, however, is that it starkly presents the pervasiveness of the state’s segregationist mentality by evoking the memory of the infamous buses under the Jim Crow laws of the southern United States.

On a related note, Arab minority rights organization Adalah filed a lawsuit against the segregation of an Israeli youth soccer league along Jewish-Palestinian lines. The decision to segregate the Jewish and Arab youth teams into different leagues was apparently made in response to complaints by Jewish parents, according to a statement by Adalah.

Related:
Palestinian-only buses serve to incentivize segregation
Photos: Israel’s ‘Palestinian only’ segregated bus lines
West Bank and East Jerusalem buses are already segregated

]]>
http://972mag.com/segregating-the-evening-commute-to-the-west-bank/98041/feed/ 98
PHOTOS: Right-wing protest demands ‘revenge,’ clashes in E. Jerusalem http://972mag.com/photos-right-wing-protest-demands-revenge-clashes-in-e-jerusalem/97996/ http://972mag.com/photos-right-wing-protest-demands-revenge-clashes-in-e-jerusalem/97996/#comments Sat, 25 Oct 2014 11:52:33 +0000 http://972mag.com/?p=97996  A day after an attack that took the life of a three-month-old Israeli girl, over 150 right-wing activists called for vengeance and the expulsion of Palestinians. Continued restrictions on worship lead to clashes in East Jerusalem.

Photos and text by Oren Ziv, Yotam Ronen / Activestills.org

Palestinians perform Friday Prayer at the neighbourhood of Ras Al-Amud in East Jerusalem due to Israeli Government's entrance restriction to the al-Aqsa Mosque for the Palestinians under the age of 40, October 24, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Palestinians perform Friday prayers in the Ras al-Amud neighborhood of East Jerusalem due to Israeli restrictions on access to the Aqsa Mosque for Palestinians under the age of 40, October 24, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Israeli police prevented Muslim worshipers under 40 from entering the Aqsa Mosque on Friday. Because of the restrictions, hundreds of Palestinians from East Jerusalem held their Friday prayers near makeshift police checkpoints at the edge of the adjacent Palestinian neighborhoods.

After prayers, police pushed worshipers into the adjacent East Jerusalem neighborhoods. Palestinian youth threw rocks at police forces at Ras al-Amud, which were answered by stun grenades.

Read more on restrictions on worship in Jerusalem

In Wadi Joz, undercover police dressed as Palestinian men arrested three young men after the prayers came to an end.

In the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Issawiya, dozens of young men marched toward the local gas station, where a large group of Israeli police had been stationed since morning. The youth burned tires and threw rocks. The police then entered the neighborhood and shot large amounts of rubber bullets and tear gas.

In Silwan, the East Jerusalem neighborhood where the suspect in the terror attack lived, clashes have been taking place on a daily basis since the attack, and before that in response to new settlement homes in the neighborhood. Police were expected to hand over the body of Abdulrahman Shallodi late Saturday night for burial.

Palestinians perform Friday Prayers at the neighberhood of Ras Al-Amud  due to Israeli Government's entrance restriction to the al-Aqsa Mosque for the Palestinians under the age of 40 in Jerusalem, October 24, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Palestinians perform Friday prayers in the Ras al-Amud neighborhood of East Jerusalem due to Israeli restrictions on access to the Aqsa Mosque for Palestinians under the age of 40, October 24, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Palestinians perform Friday Prayer at the neighbourhood of Ras Al-Amud in East Jerusalem due to Israeli Government's entrance restriction to the al-Aqsa Mosque for the Palestinians under the age of 40, October 24, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Palestinians perform Friday prayers in the Ras al-Amud neighborhood of East Jerusalem due to Israeli restrictions on access to the Aqsa Mosque for Palestinians under the age of 40, October 24, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Israeli policemen push a Palestinian man at the end f the Friday prayer, at the neighbourhood of Ras Al-Amud in East Jerusalem, October 24, 2014. The Israeli Government restricted the entrance to the al-Aqsa Mosque for the Palestinians under the age of 40. (Activestills.org)

Israeli policemen push a Palestinian man at the end of the Friday prayers in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Ras al-Amud, October 24, 2014.
Israeli police barred the entrance to the Aqsa Mosque for Palestinians under the age of 40. (Activestills.org)

Israeli police shoot tear gas during clashes with Israeli police in the neighbourhood of Issawia on October 24, 2014 in Jerusalem. Clashes have continued two days after a Palestinian man drove a car in to a crowd, killing a baby and injuring seven people in Jerusalem. (Activestills.org)

Israeli police shoot tear gas during clashes with Palestinians in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Issawiya on October 24, 2014. Clashes have continued two days after a Palestinian man drove a car in to a crowd, killing a baby and injuring seven others in Jerusalem. (Activestills.org)

Palestinian youth seen burning tires during clashes with Israeli police in the neighbourhood of Issawia on October 24, 2014 in Jerusalem.

Palestinian youth burning tires during clashes with Israeli police in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Issawiya on October 24, 2014. (Activestills.org)

A day after a terrorist attack at a Jerusalem light rail station that took the life of a three-month-old Israeli girl, over 150 right-wing activists gathered at the site of the attack to protest what they described as the government’s inaction in preventing attacks against Jews.

Police arrested 10 of the right-wing protesters, some of whom attempted to block the train tracks. Police declared the protest an “illegal gathering,” Thursday night.

The protesters, many of whom wore t-shirts identifying them with the far-right anti-miscegenation group Lehava, called on the government to avenge the death and expel Arabs from Jerusalem, including those who are not involved in violence against Israelis.

Right-wing Israeli activists, many of whom wore t-shirts identifying them with the far-right anti-miscegenation group Lehava, call for revenge at the East Jerusalem scene of a deadly car attack in which a Palestinian man killed a baby and injured seven Israelis a day before, October 23, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Right-wing Israeli activists, many of whom wore t-shirts identifying them with the far-right anti-miscegenation group Lehava, call for revenge at the scene of a deadly car attack in which a Palestinian man killed a baby and injured seven Israelis a day before, October 23, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Right-wing Israeli activists, many of whom wore t-shirts identifying them with the far-right anti-miscegenation group Lehava, call for revenge at the East Jerusalem scene of a deadly car attack in which a Palestinian man killed a baby and injured seven Israelis a day before, October 23, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Right-wing Israeli activists attack a cameraman during a protest calling for revenge at the East Jerusalem scene of a deadly car attack in which a Palestinian man killed a baby and injured seven Israelis a day before, October 23, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Right-wing Israeli activists attack a cameraman during a protest calling for revenge at the East Jerusalem scene of a deadly car attack in which a Palestinian man killed a baby and injured seven Israelis a day before, October 23, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Israeli policemen arrest a right-wing activist during a protest calling for revenge at the East Jerusalem scene of a deadly car attack in which a Palestinian man killed a baby and injured seven Israelis a day before, October 23, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Israeli policemen arrest a right-wing activist during a protest calling for revenge at the East Jerusalem scene of a deadly car attack in which a Palestinian man killed a baby and injured seven Israelis a day before, October 23, 2014. (Activestills.org)

 

Related:
PHOTOS: Protests in Jerusalem over Aqsa Mosque closures
The illusion of religious freedom in Jerusalem
Nine more Jewish families take over Silwan homes in dead of night

]]>
http://972mag.com/photos-right-wing-protest-demands-revenge-clashes-in-e-jerusalem/97996/feed/ 73
Hebrew U. threatens Palestinian students with expulsion over political activities http://972mag.com/hebrew-u-threatens-palestinian-students-with-expulsion-for-political-activities/97987/ http://972mag.com/hebrew-u-threatens-palestinian-students-with-expulsion-for-political-activities/97987/#comments Fri, 24 Oct 2014 15:59:23 +0000 http://972mag.com/?p=97987 Twelve Palestinian students are facing possible expulsion from Jerusalem’s Hebrew University for participating in an ‘illegal’ political protest. In the past, the university only took steps against particular student groups. Now, it’s switching gears and targeting individual students.

By Rami Younis

Near the end of September, 12 Palestinian students received a notice from the Hebrew University administration, stating that Dean of Students Udi Shavit had lodged a complaint against them over their participation in an “unauthorized demonstration that goes against regulations,” which took place on July 10, 2014. The notice said that the administration was waiting for a response from the students before it decides whether they will face a disciplinary committee. The students were then given seven days to respond to the claims, despite the fact that the contents of the complaint was never made clear to them. Should they be asked to stand before the committee, they would face possible suspension or expulsion from the university.

The event took place against the backdrop of the Palestinian prisoners hunger strike. At the time, many events and protests took place across the country and the world. The aforementioned event did not include a demonstration. A small number of students gathered spontaneously outside the “Forum” area of the Mt. Scopus campus, and expressed support for the hunger strikers and administrative detainees.

Palestinian students protest in solidarity with Palestinian prisoner that are currently on a hunger strike inside Israeli jails, in the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, June 10, 2014. (Faiz Abu Rmeleh/Activestills.org)

Palestinian students protest in solidarity with Palestinian prisoner that are currently on a hunger strike inside Israeli jails, in the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, June 10, 2014. (Faiz Abu Rmeleh/Activestills.org)

“It was definitely not a protest,” says Khalil Gharra, a 22-year-old philosophy and political science student, and one of the 12 who faces potential expulsion. “I have no idea who organized it. It was most likely a spontaneous gathering of a few people who came to protest against the conditions of Palestinian administrative detainees, and to support them in their hunger strike.”

According to the students, they did not know that the event was unauthorized or that it violated university regulations. “University security personnel arrived and moved us into a small area outside the entrance of the university. They did not inform us that the action was illegal. Actually, the opposite was true. The fact that they even moved us in the first place allowed for the gathering to continue, and gave other students the opportunity to join. This created the feeling that the event was legal and authorized,” says Gharra.

“Only later did the university claim that the event violated regulations and was unauthorized,” he adds.

This isn’t the first time that Hebrew University has been accused of limiting its Palestinian students’ freedom of speech. Gharra, like other students, believes this stems from targeted persecution. “This is a direct continuation of the past two years. The university made the same accusations after the Balad student group organized a cultural event at the Hadassah campus in June 2013. They said that Hanin Zoabi spoke without permission. This was totally false – she didn’t even speak. They just made up a reason to attack the group.”

A heckler shouts at demonstrators protesting against Israeli government attempts to recruit Palestinian Christian citizens of Israel, May 7, 2014. (photo: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)

A heckler shouts at demonstrators protesting against Israeli government attempts to recruit Palestinian Christian citizens of Israel, May 7, 2014. (photo: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)

“And it didn’t end there,” Gharra continues. “During a protest against the conscription of Christians into the army, which also took place in the Forum area, the university security called the police. The police arrived in huge numbers, along with undercover policemen dressed as Palestinian students. Students said that they saw security personnel hand out blue hats with the word “security” on them to the Jewish counter-protesters. Twelve students were arrested, including myself, after the police and security personnel used excessive force.”

Things get personal

Riham Nassra, a 24 year-old law student who is also facing possible expulsion, has no doubts: “We’re seeing a new strategy of individual complaints submitted by the dean. Until now, the complaints were submitted against Palestinian student groups, which lead to them being temporarily suspended. Balad was suspended, Hadash were harassed and threatened several times, and Palestinian students continued with their political activities in the student groups.”

What’s the difference between complaints against political student groups and individual complaints against students?

“There’s a big difference. The university saw that the student groups continue to function, while the students continued to demonstrate, so it simply moved toward personal deterrence. It is known that the consequences of facing a disciplinary committee can be disastrous for a student. In many cases it can end in suspension, probation or even expulsion. When you go after a student group, the harm is collective rather than personal. They probably think that personal targeting will serve as a more effective deterrence.”

What is really surprising about this entire story is both how exactly the university knew to identify those same students who were present at the gathering, and how it began taking action against them. Nassra has a feeling that the university is using new methods of harassment.

“They probably came prepared. They let us stay there, and allowed other passersby to join. Then they started implementing methods reminiscent of intelligence services, which do not show respect for an academic institute, in order to identify us.”

Right-wing students demonstrate in support Operation Cast Lead at Hebrew University, Dec. 29, 2008. (photo: Activestills.org)

Right-wing students demonstrate in support Operation Cast Lead at Hebrew University, Dec. 29, 2008. (photo: Activestills.org)

“And you know what? Out of the 16 or 17 students that were there on that day, 12 complaints were lodged against university students. That’s a majority of the people who were there. Most of the other students were likely not from the university, which means the university could not target them. This can definitely be seen as an attempt to cause innocent students to fall into a trap. The university takes no steps against the ‘Im Tirzu’ student group, which has been recognized as a racist group by an Israeli court, and whose members chant racist chants during protests against Arab student groups.”

The students have yet to receive dates for their disciplinary committees.

The university’s conduct raises many questions. Lately we have witnessed an unprecedented increase in harassment and targeting of Arab students in universities and colleges across Israel. However, in this case, at least according to the students, the transition from threatening a political body on campus to directly threatening the academic future of students runs contrary to the values of freedom of expression and freedom to protest. There is no doubt that this story will only harm the university’s reputation, as well as that of the Israeli academy, especially in light of growing international pressure to boycott Israeli universities.

Hebrew University responded to the allegations:

The students were summoned to the disciplinary committee after they organized a protest with no prior authorization, as is required by university procedures – an act that constitutes a violation of the university’s disciplinary rules. The university treats all of its students equally, and calls on every student to respect its regulations. The university will take action against any student who chooses to violate the regulations, regardless of national, religious or other affiliations.

The author is a Palestinian activist and writer. This article was first published on +972′s Hebrew-language sister site, Local Call. Read it in Hebrew here.

Related:
Jerusalem police arrest Palestinian activist in his Hebrew U dorm
PHOTOS: Hebrew U. students protest pressure on Christians to join army
At Hebrew University, Arabic textbooks reflect a Zionist reality

Newsletter banner 6 -540

]]>
http://972mag.com/hebrew-u-threatens-palestinian-students-with-expulsion-for-political-activities/97987/feed/ 14
IDF court convicts Palestinian non-violent organizer, EU human rights defender http://972mag.com/idf-court-convicts-palestinian-non-violent-organizer-eu-human-rights-defender/97965/ http://972mag.com/idf-court-convicts-palestinian-non-violent-organizer-eu-human-rights-defender/97965/#comments Thu, 23 Oct 2014 13:28:17 +0000 http://972mag.com/?p=97965 Israeli military court convicts Abdullah Abu Rahmah of obstructing a bulldozer building the separation barrier. His previous trial and imprisonment was followed closely by western governments.

Abdullah Abu Rahmah at his trial in the Ofer Military Court, September 15, 2010. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Abdullah Abu Rahmah at his trial in the Ofer Military Court, September 15, 2010. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Abdullah Abu Rahmah, one of the central organizers of the popular resistance protests against the separation barrier in the West Bank village of Bil’in, was convicted of obstructing the work of a soldier by an Israeli military court this week. He will likely be sentenced to four months in prison.

Abu Rahmah, who was recognized by the European Union as a “human rights defender” dedicated to non-violence, previously served over a year in prison for organizing “illegal marches” as well as for “incitement.” All political demonstrations are illegal for Palestinians under Israeli military law.

+972 named Abu Rahmah “person of the year” in 2010. The choice was made, we wrote at the time:

Because he has become the face of the grassroots, unarmed resistance movement to Israel’s security barrier; because he is the person who has raised international awareness not only of the devastation caused by the barrier, but also the existence of a well-organized, non-violent grassroots opposition movement  – one that brings together Palestinians, Israelis and international supporters in a joint struggle. Because he is the answer to the question, “Where is the Palestinian Gandhi?” (answer: there are many; and they are languishing in Israel’s jails). Because he has never wavered in his commitment to non-violence – not even after his cousin Bassam Abu Rahmah was killed by a high-velocity tear gas canister shot by Israeli soldiers directly at his chest; nor after his cousin Adeeb Abu Rahmah was arrested and imprisoned for participating in weekly demonstrations against the barrier that separates the people of Bil’in from their own farmland.

Among other things, Abu Rahmah was arrested in the past for possession of spent tear gas grenades the Israeli army shot at protesters in Bil’in. The indictment, in which he was not convicted, referred to the used grenades as “weaponry.”

A display of spent tear gas canisters for which Abu Rahmah was indicted but not convicted. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

A display of spent tear gas canisters for which Abu Rahmah was indicted but not convicted, Bil’in, January 3, 2010. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

This week Abu Rahmah was convicted by a military court of obstructing the work of a soldier. The incident occurred in 2012 when he attempted to stop a bulldozer from clearing the route for the construction of a fence in the Beitunia area of the West Bank. According to AFP, Abu Rahmah’s conviction will include a four-month suspended sentence for an arrest in 2009, in addition to another that the court will decide on in the beginning of December.

Abu Rahmah’s attorney, Gaby Lasky, told AFP that the conviction is part of the army’s continual harassment of non-violent activists. The indictment is politically rather than criminally motivated, she added.

Regarding Abu Rahmah’s previous arrest, it is important to clarify that any and all Palestinian protests in the West Bank are illegal under Israeli military law. Therefore, any march is also deemed illegal. In addition, the crime of “incitement” does not necessarily refer to incitement to violence, but rather to any form of demonstration or protest.

Related:
+972 Magazine’s 2010 Person of the Year: Abdullah Abu Rahmah
PHOTOS: What the press missed in Bil’in tear gas flower garden
WATCH: Hundreds commemorate nine years of popular struggle in Bil’in

A version of this article was first published on +972′s Hebrew-language sister site, Local Call. Read it in Hebrew here.

]]>
http://972mag.com/idf-court-convicts-palestinian-non-violent-organizer-eu-human-rights-defender/97965/feed/ 42
Ultra-Orthodox Jews tear down ‘bat mitzvah’ ads in Jerusalem http://972mag.com/ultra-orthodox-jews-tear-down-bat-mitzvah-ads-in-jerusalem/97905/ http://972mag.com/ultra-orthodox-jews-tear-down-bat-mitzvah-ads-in-jerusalem/97905/#comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 13:23:49 +0000 http://972mag.com/?p=97905 Buses carrying ‘Women of the Wall’ advertisements are vandalized and attacked; until earlier this year the Egged bus company refused to run ads featuring photos of women in Jerusalem.

Unlike the majority of Jewish communities in western countries, most girls in Israel do not usually have bat mitzvah ceremonies. A new Jerusalem campaign promoting the right of girls to have the ceremonies at the Western Wall has been met with violence by ultra-Orthodox elements in the city.

Busses carrying the advertisements, paid for by Women of the Wall, have been vandalized and the posters themselves ripped off of public buses. Half of the ads were vandalized, according to the Egged public bus company’s advertising agency.

The posters, which carry Hebrew text saying, “Mom, I want a bat mitzvah at the motel, too,” also feature photos of a bat mitzvah-aged girl and her mother.

A damaged 'Women of the Wall' ad on an Egged bus in Jerusalem, October 21, 2014. (Courtesy of Women of the Wall)

A damaged ‘Women of the Wall’ ad on an Egged bus in Jerusalem, October 21, 2014. (Courtesy of Women of the Wall)

Police reportedly had to extricate a bus carrying the ad that was attacked by ultra-Orthodox protesters in Jerusalem in recent days.

The marginalization of women in public spaces

At issue is more than just the idea of young women partaking in bat mitzvah ceremonies. Placing images of any women on public advertisements has been a point of serious contention in Jerusalem for years, part of a larger public struggle against pressure from ultra-Orthodox Israelis to marginalize women in public spaces.

For years, Egged, Israel’s most prominent public bus company, had refused to carry advertisements that featured images of women on bus lines in cities with large ultra-orthodox populations like Jerusalem. Ultra-Orthodox communities claim that just displaying photos of women is “indecent.”

Only half a year ago did the company agree — as part of a high-profile court settlement — to begin accepting advertisements featuring women. The settlement was only possible because the state agreed to cover physical damage to Egged’s buses caused by vandalism related to ads featuring women.

Two years earlier, the bus company decided to stop running advertisements featuring any people, men or women, in order to avoid being accused of discrimination while appeasing the ultra-Orthodox community.

Responding to the latest violence and vandalism, Women of the Wall leader Lesley Sachs said, “It is sad to yet again see the ultra-Orthodox citizens take the law into their own hands and use Judaism as an excuse for the use of force, threat and violence against women. We call on ultra-Orthodox leadership to strongly denounce this act of violence and all others.”

One of the young women featured on Women of the Wall’s current ad campaign plans to hold her bat mitzvah at the Western Wall Plaza this coming Friday. Police, however, have many times in the past prevented Women of the Wall from bringing their Torah scroll into the plaza.

The group and other non-Orthodox streams of Judaism negotiated a deal with the Israeli government to build an egalitarian prayer space at the Western Wall Plaza, although the plan has yet to be fully realized.

Related:
3 women arrested while praying at Western Wall in 24 hours
Supporting roles: Men stand in solidarity with Women of the Wall
‘Why I cannot stand with Women of the Wall’

]]>
http://972mag.com/ultra-orthodox-jews-tear-down-bat-mitzvah-ads-in-jerusalem/97905/feed/ 7
WATCH: Reflections on Gaza — from Likud to ‘Women Waging Peace’ http://972mag.com/watch-reflections-on-gaza-from-likud-to-women-waging-peace/97902/ http://972mag.com/watch-reflections-on-gaza-from-likud-to-women-waging-peace/97902/#comments Tue, 21 Oct 2014 11:20:58 +0000 http://972mag.com/?p=97902 Over a month after this summer’s devastating Gaza war, small groups of Israelis are starting to reflect on what was and what will be. From a debate hosted by the youth wing of Israel’s ruling Likud party to a new group called Women Waging Peace and the Parents Circle forum of bereaved families, Social TV visits with those who are ready to start talking.

Related:
Channeling loss to stimulate change: 71 days of dialogue
In my name, in your name, in all of our names

]]>
http://972mag.com/watch-reflections-on-gaza-from-likud-to-women-waging-peace/97902/feed/ 1