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  • Seven Nights 1: The Stabbing

    The plan was to write a leisurely travel journal: a record of Canaan's summer nights, but the journey began with a dark event: a stabbing at Jerusalem pride, and took on a different nature. Welcome to a seven-part, nocturnal diary of shock and recovery, a true story from an emotional land. For other nights click here. The plan is simple: I will only write about things that happened after dark. Still, I must begin with something that happened at dusk. It was 6:30 p.m. or so and we were walking in central West Jerusalem when six people got stabbed right…

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  • A dark stain on all of Judaism

    Friday's arson was a terrorist attack familiar to the likes of ISIL. Now is the time for ideas; condemnations aren't enough. The question is not only what was said that led to the murder, but what we did not say. By Meir Buzaglo Perhaps if I were a better Jew, I would fast today. With every such attack by "religious" people, the wound within Judaism grows. Last summer, after Muhammad Abu Khdeir was burned alive, Rabbi Israel Maimran told me: "I am ill." At this moment, we condemn and let the police do the talking. But perhaps the police, and even…

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  • The Long Road to Bethlehem: Part Three

    Click here to read parts one and two. The New Year comes and passes. It’s January 2014 and I’ve been living in the territories for almost a year. But rather than becoming more comfortable in my new surroundings and feeling like my usual curious and adventurous self—I am the woman, after all, who has traveled some 20 countries, mostly alone—I find myself turning inwards. I prefer to stay in Bethlehem, close to home. This is not me. The occupation and the checkpoints, particularly the flying checkpoints, have something to do with the change: on my way back to Bethlehem from…

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  • Celebrating Eid in Gaza amidst the rubble of war

    Wafaa takes me back to the pile of rubble, but this time, not to show me the destruction. She points to a small shrub at the rubble’s edge, battered, but clearly alive. ‘Ibrahim’s tree,’ she says of the living reminder of her son. By Jen Marlowe Wafaa Awajah’s family had scarcely taken their seats in a circle of plastic chairs when her brother hitched up his pants to show me the scars on his leg from where he had been injured by an Israeli soldier. Another brother had also sustained injuries from the army; he, too, showed me his wounds. As…

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  • If there'll be peace, all the 'arsim' will come

    By Roy Hasan I just love those socialists who hate capitalism so ostentatiously, wear ugly sandals and torn t-shirts, wrapping themselves in a homeless look without telling a soul about grandma’s inheritance or dad’s real estate (they look homeless too) and criticize the culture of affluence with bombast as if they were prophets of vengeance with gurgling stomachs. I just love those who wish their Arab brothers Ramadan Kareem and sign petitions legalizing the sale of hametz during Passover. I just love those who relish in the muazzin’s call and see the Chabad or Breslav truck in the neighborhood as…

  • In Sisi's Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood are the new Jews

    Weighted down by historical, religious and linguistic inaccuracies, Egyptian television series 'The Jewish Quarter’ nevertheless tells an intriguing story of the political, social and religious changes that have transformed Egypt — in 1948 and in 2015. An Egyptian Ramadan television series called “The Jewish Quarter”* has attracted quite a bit of international media attention for its sympathetic portrayal of Jewish Egyptians during the years immediately following the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, up until 1954. Set in Cairo, the ongoing multi-episode drama takes its name from one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods, where Jews, Muslims and Christians…

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  • Surviving the ups and downs: Israel's first Arab-Jewish school turns 30

    For three decades the school at Neve Shalom/Wahat al-Salam has taught our children how to grow and become adults with a cohesive national and human identity, without fear of the other. Today, however, the future looks as uncertain as ever. (Translated from Hebrew by Rivka Einy) Atop a small mountain in the Latrun area lies the village we chose to establish a small family. Located between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, the Arab-Jewish village goes by the name Neve Shalom/Wahat al-Salam. A few weeks ago, the village hosted an emotional and beautiful event to mark 30 years since the opening of the village school. All of…

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  • Call for action: Street campaign remembers Gaza's 'obliterated families'

    There were 142 so-called 'obliterated families' in Gaza last summer — families that lost three or more members in Israeli attacks during the military offensive. Marking one year since the war, the Activestills photography collective wants your help to launch an international street exhibition to bring their faces and names to public spaces in cities around the world. One year on, the Activestills photography collective is launching an international street campaign to the Israeli offensive in Gaza last summer. Activestills is calling on activists — with a downloadable street exhibition kit — to bring the faces and names of Gaza families…

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  • [WATCH] Street Talk: Is Jerusalem divided or united?

    Forty-eight years since Israel conquered East Jerusalem and declared the city unified, Social TV took to the streets of Tel Aviv to ask regular folks what they think. You might be surprised by what they had to say. Read more: Jerusalem Day brings tensions in divided city to the fore How Jerusalem makes Palestinians disappear Fighting occupation must not blind us from remembering the Nakba

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  • Why I won't be participating in Tel Aviv's Pride Parade

    Israeli security forces exploit Palestinians’ sexual orientation to blackmail them into becoming collaborators. The Israeli LGBT mainstream's silence about this persecution exposes a moral lapse. By Fady Khoury This weekend, LGBT Israelis will take to the streets of Tel Aviv as part of the yearly Pride Parade, this year under the banner, “gender equality and support for the transgender community.” People from all over the world will throng to the streets of Tel Aviv, adorned with rainbow flags and Israeli flags, all in order to take part in the days-long party. It is a massive tourist attraction and the pride and…

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  • No permit, no entry

    I thought of mandatory conscription as somewhat of an inconvenience — I never thought the army would be ‘fun.’ I never expected to serve at a checkpoint. I never expected to hate myself for it. By Lauren S. Marcus It was a balmy Saturday night in Tel Aviv. I stood on the smoking patio of a club which overlooks the sea, and there was a soft breeze which carried on it the scents of the Mediterranean, the various shwarma and falafel restaurants which dominate that part of the city, and the perfumes and colognes of the patrons around me. As I sipped my…

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  • Meet Palestine's first all-female race-car team

    A new documentary tells the story of five brave Palestinian female race-car drivers who must learn to challenge their own society's norms while facing the violence of Israel's military occupation. That pursuit of something good, which fills you up with hope and positive energy, has become mission impossible even for optimists such as myself. Over the weekend I planned to watch a movie with a friend who suffers from "temporary depression" (such as myself), until our plot was foiled by a little thing called children and husbands. On Sunday we tried our best to head out to a stand-up comedy…

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  • Shhhh, the Nakba made it to prime time

    Israel's top satire program takes on the Nakba. Sometimes humor can succeed in places where activism or advocacy fall short. The tortured road of the Nakba towards a legitimate place in the Israeli historical memory has some unexpected twists. Eitan Bronstein Aparicio and Dr. Eléonore Merza Bronstein recently explained that at first, it was mainly Palestinians who wished to commemorate the Nakba. Next came far-left wing Jews in Israel. Following that came the right-wing or oppositional Jewish Israeli approaches, such as “Jewish Nakba,” a phrase coined over the years as a name for the violent expulsion of Jews from Arab countries…

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+972 is an independent, blog-based web magazine. It was launched in August 2010, resulting from a merger of a number of popular English-language blogs dealing with life and politics in Israel and Palestine.

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