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  • What I learned touring the rubble piles of Gaza

    A year after the devastating war on Gaza, an activist visits human rights defenders still working among piles of rubble and roiling from trauma. By Jen Marlowe I crouched on the floor of the beat-up Mercedes yellow cab, so that I could film Yaser Abed Alkhafor at a better angle.  We were driving slowly through Khuza’a, a town near the southern Gaza Strip city of Khan Younes. “We can see that the destruction in Khuza'a didn't target only one place, but it is mass destruction targeting the whole area,” Alkhafor said, pointing to the destroyed homes lining the road. Alkhafor,…

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  • Seven Nights 5: Sodom Burning

    I don't always drink beer in bars with racist symbols on the wall. But when I do, it's for a good cause. Part five of the nighttime journey. For other nights click here. Saturday night we were back on the streets. Hundreds of left-leaning urbanites marching through central Tel Aviv, condemning the government for turning this land into a hothouse for inter-group violence. Pride flags flew alongside banners promoting unity and equality between Jews and Arabs. By now, the fateful morning of July 31 had claimed the life of Saad Dawabshe, father of baby Ali, who had passed away the morning…

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  • Seven Nights 4: Contact point

    Chapter four in the nighttime journey is a tale of two parties. For other nights click here. If you think the nights I skip in this chronicle are uneventful, think again fast. On Wednesday I was rushed to the airport with an immigration scandal. A young American who flew in to intern with a company for which I work was interrogated on arrival and then deported. The reason remained withheld but we suspected political bias. This is hardly an unusual occurrence these days. The intern handed her interrogators the number of the company head: a leader in alternative tourism, a National…

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  • Seven Nights 3: Sidewalks and playgrounds

    Part three. In which old friends reunite and talk about leaving. For other nights click here. Some time after sunset, the muezzin at Jaffa's Abu Nabout mosque called for prayer one last time. Meanwhile, protesters at the nearby Clock Square stretched a clothing line across the street. On the line hung baby clothes, reminders of the baby Ali Dwabsheh, who was burned alive. I crossed the street to take a photo, then returned to the side where the other protesters stood, almost tripping as I did over a bundle of clothes made to look like a dead Palestinian baby. Had…

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  • Seven Nights 2: Privileged white male

    Part two. Following the attack, our night owl returns to Jerusalem in drag for a rally, and walks into an emotional pitfall.   For other nights click here. Someone else was murdered on Thursday, the night of the Jerusalem Pride stabbing. In the northern West Bank village of Duma, a group of hooded men, most likely members of the extremist Jewish "Price Tag" cell, set fire to two family homes and left threatening graffiti in Hebrew on the walls. A baby, Ali Dawabsheh, was burned to death. His parents and bother were rescued but remain in an Israeli hospital in critical…

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  • Seven Nights 1: The Stabbing

    The plan was to write a leisurely travel journal: a record of Canaan's summer nights, but the journey began with a dark event: a stabbing at Jerusalem pride, and took on a different nature. Welcome to a seven-part, nocturnal diary of shock and recovery, a true story from an emotional land. For other nights click here. The plan is simple: I will only write about things that happened after dark. Still, I must begin with something that happened at dusk. It was 6:30 p.m. or so and we were walking in central West Jerusalem when six people got stabbed right…

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  • A dark stain on all of Judaism

    Friday's arson was a terrorist attack familiar to the likes of ISIL. Now is the time for ideas; condemnations aren't enough. The question is not only what was said that led to the murder, but what we did not say. By Meir Buzaglo Perhaps if I were a better Jew, I would fast today. With every such attack by "religious" people, the wound within Judaism grows. Last summer, after Muhammad Abu Khdeir was burned alive, Rabbi Israel Maimran told me: "I am ill." At this moment, we condemn and let the police do the talking. But perhaps the police, and even…

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  • The Long Road to Bethlehem: Part Three

    Click here to read parts one and two. The New Year comes and passes. It’s January 2014 and I’ve been living in the territories for almost a year. But rather than becoming more comfortable in my new surroundings and feeling like my usual curious and adventurous self—I am the woman, after all, who has traveled some 20 countries, mostly alone—I find myself turning inwards. I prefer to stay in Bethlehem, close to home. This is not me. The occupation and the checkpoints, particularly the flying checkpoints, have something to do with the change: on my way back to Bethlehem from…

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  • Celebrating Eid in Gaza amidst the rubble of war

    Wafaa takes me back to the pile of rubble, but this time, not to show me the destruction. She points to a small shrub at the rubble’s edge, battered, but clearly alive. ‘Ibrahim’s tree,’ she says of the living reminder of her son. By Jen Marlowe Wafaa Awajah’s family had scarcely taken their seats in a circle of plastic chairs when her brother hitched up his pants to show me the scars on his leg from where he had been injured by an Israeli soldier. Another brother had also sustained injuries from the army; he, too, showed me his wounds. As…

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  • If there'll be peace, all the 'arsim' will come

    By Roy Hasan I just love those socialists who hate capitalism so ostentatiously, wear ugly sandals and torn t-shirts, wrapping themselves in a homeless look without telling a soul about grandma’s inheritance or dad’s real estate (they look homeless too) and criticize the culture of affluence with bombast as if they were prophets of vengeance with gurgling stomachs. I just love those who wish their Arab brothers Ramadan Kareem and sign petitions legalizing the sale of hametz during Passover. I just love those who relish in the muazzin’s call and see the Chabad or Breslav truck in the neighborhood as…

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+972 is an independent, blog-based web magazine. It was launched in August 2010, resulting from a merger of a number of popular English-language blogs dealing with life and politics in Israel and Palestine.

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Illustrations: Eran Mendel