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British activist detained entering Israel, facing 10-year ban

Gary Spedding was detained after landing in Tel Aviv ahead of meetings with parliamentarians and activists. He says his phone was hacked and contacts extracted. 

A high-profile member of Northern Ireland’s Alliance Party and a long-standing activist for human rights in Israel and the Occupied Territories, Gary Spedding, was detained on arrival at Ben-Gurion Airport on Thursday and told would be deported and banned from the country for 10 years. Speaking from the airport, after being held for eight hours, Spedding told +972 that the interrogating officers hacked into his mobile phone, and copied email addresses and telephone numbers. He also said no reason for his impending deportation was given, except that he was a “liar” and a “security threat.”

“I flew in to Tel Aviv from London Luton at about 4 p.m. local time,” Spedding told +972.  ”When I got to passport control the guy asked me to step aside and wait. After about an hour, three people came and took me to a room. They questioned me and took my phone, asking for my security code. I wouldn’t give my code but agreed to type it in to show the phone was a real phone. What I didn’t realize is that somebody is standing behind me and watching me do it. My Hebrew is not very good, but good enough to pick up he was reading out the digits I was typing to the rest of the security team. ” Spedding said the security team then logged onto his mobile phone without permission and scanned through his contacts, text messages and email, copying some of the content manually onto a notepad.

“They told me they’d hold me for nine days until my return flight, so as not to have to pay for my deportation,” Spedding said. The security team questioning Spedding then changed, and one official told him a decision was made to deport him and ban him from Israel for 10 years. “I was told this was a fact, not a threat, and there was nothing neither I or my government could do,” said Spedding, who is a dual Australian and British citizen.

The activist was still being held near Ben-Gurion Airport on Thursday night, and the state’s plans regarding his deportation were not immediately clear. “I’m just one guy, sitting here at Ben-Gurion, pretty tired and not feeling so good but apart from that, I’m ok,” Spedding sought to stress when commenting on the attention news of his detention had attracted on social media networks. “This kind of shit happens to Israeli and Palestinian activists all the time, as we all know, and nobody speaks up as much for them.”

Spedding, 23, is a well-known member of the Alliance Party in Northern Ireland, and is hoping to contest a seat in next elections to the devolved Northern Ireland Assembly in 2016;  he is not yet an approved party candidate. He said that on this visit he had been expecting to meet with Palestinian and Israeli activists and officials, including MKs, to discuss a variety of projects, with a particular emphasis on Northern Ireland’s transition from armed conflict to political process.

As erstwhile leader of the Queen’s University, Belfast, Palestine Society, Spedding had clashed with pro-Israel voices in Ireland and beyond, prompting one pro-Israel commentator to write an entire book titled “Dear Gary: Why You’re Wrong About Israel.” (Full disclosure – I traveled from London to Belfast as a guest speaker of the society in March 2012.) Spedding also repeatedly clashed with some pro-Palestine activists, including ones he felt had allowed themselves to slip from criticism of Israeli policies and politics to ultra-nationalism or anti-Semitism. He has written op-eds for a number of online publications, including Huffington Post UK, Belfast Telegraph, and +972.

If Spedding does indeed get deported, he won’t be the first one – Israel has deported and banned dozens of solidarity activists over the past decade, from ISM members to international activists picked up at Palestinian demonstrations. To my knowledge, no explanation has ever been given for any deportation or ban, except the oblique “security risk.” No evidence implicating any deported activist in any violence has ever been produced.

Anyone with any inside knowledge of why Israeli services thinks any of this makes Israel any safer or better-looking is invited to contact me over email (dimi at 972 dot com); full discretion guaranteed.

Update: On Friday morning, the British embassy was told Gary was a threat to Israel because he was very popular on the social networks and could start demonstrations if allowed into the country.

Update (Friday evening): Gary was deported with a 10-year entry ban to Israel.

Correction: This article has been amended to reflect that Spedding is not an approved candidate for the Alliance Party at previous or future elections. The Alliance Party has, however been in contact with Gary and in a statement to +972 said it is “extremely concerned for his welfare,” adding that it trusts UK consular officials will afford him all the necessary support.

Related:
‘No Falasteen for you!’ Shin Bet banned me from Israel for 10 years 
Exclusive: ‘Political contract’ required to enter Israel
Testimony: A filmmaker detained at airport fights deportation

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  • COMMENTS

    1. If Spedding is charged of no crime, nor even has a criminal history, nor even is under investigation in his own land, the decision to ban him from Israel is really directed to those who would associate with him in Israel. If he was scheduled to meet MK’s, this means that the State, acting as the border authority, has interfered with the civil society and political activity of a member of the Knesset. Since the executive is a subset of the legislature (Knesset), this means that the ruling coalition, by allowing such banning, is effectively acting to harm its Knesset opposition. Spedding is a very small pawn in a zero sum game of political dominance of the ruling coalition.

      The speech silenced is not just Spedding’s but those he would associate with in Israel. When “security” is expanded beyond threat of violence it becomes a form of thought control. That seems to be what is happening here.

      Reply to Comment
      • Kolumn9

        No, it just means that Israel exercised its sovereign right to prevent entrance to someone that it does not desire in the country.

        If that annoying European brat wants to interfere in affairs that are none of his business let him do so over social media. We have no need, nor desire, for any further European meddling in the region.

        Reply to Comment
        • Sean Mullin

          European Brat? Some people, who don’t like to use their real names have real short memories regarding the origin of a large proportion of Jewish immigrants to Israel/Palestine. Gary isn’t a security threat, he happens to be very well connected with the growing number of Israelis who stand up to and redeem your sorry, racist, unsustainable cesspit of a state. He organizes peaceful protests against inexcusable abuses of human rights, international law and general morality. A worthwhile individual then, not ashamed of his own name :)

          Reply to Comment
          • Kolumn9

            Dear Sean, you too are welcome to take your sanctimonious claptrap and go protest along with your wonderful worthwhile Gary back in his home country. Since you will likely be protesting against my country I don’t see any particularly good reason why it should let him in.

            In your country he might be ‘a worthwhile individual’. In mine he is an annoying foreign European brat that has no business sticking his nose in our region and there is no reason why his presence should be allowed. I am also very happy that he uses his real name. It makes it that much easier to know not to let him in when he shows up at border control.

            Reply to Comment
          • Sean Mullin

            Well said. Spoken like a true North Korean

            Reply to Comment
          • Kolumn9

            Oh, and thanks for using your real name.

            Reply to Comment
          • Sean Mullin

            No worries Kim

            Reply to Comment
          • Adam Dayton

            Spoken like a True North Korean? Huh -Spedding’s own country routinely bans undesirables from their soil. Ever hear of Michael Savage? I guess it’s only fascist for a country to ban people when they are banning people YOU like.

            Reply to Comment
          • Joe

            Well Sir, Why don’t he direct his humanitarian efforts towered Syria?!
            He is much more needed there, don’t you think so?!

            Reply to Comment
          • Sean Mullin

            Indeed Joe, and many activists I worked with in Israel/Palestine are doing that as we speak. Not enough perhaps, but many. I could go into detail about the reasons why so much focus seems from an Israeli perspective to be on Israel’s deeds. Some of the reasons for the focus (even bias) are good reasons; some not so good. Point is, if Israel is constantly judging itself by Syria’s standards it will be more likely to further entrench itself in systematic and deeply institutionalised injustice (which western governments support). This situation which will never result in either peace or security. Surely its time to drop that old Hasbara line? A basic thing in life is to take responsibility for ones own actions not to point at the bad kid next door in the hope no one will notice the mess you are making of your own backyard.

            Reply to Comment
          • Marcos

            I see. You are willing to have more Syrians die and suffer by allocating the time and output of activists to focus on keeping Israel in line on such marginal issues? Did you really type your last offering with a straight face?

            Reply to Comment
        • Vicky

          I do not know Gary personally. He first came to my notice online a couple of years ago, when he announced to one of my friends, “You disgrace me and every Palestinian by your support for violence”, in response to her saying that she was sick of foreigners preaching about stone-throwing. I remember raising my eyebrows a little and hoping that the disgrace wouldn’t be too dreadful for her to bear. But the fact that someone can be irritating and a bit pretentious sometimes isn’t sufficient reason to ban them from a country. Hardly anybody would be able to go anywhere if it were. It’s also a strange move tactically. Gary isn’t dangerous. He doesn’t do anything that could be remotely considered dangerous. The region is not going to be brought to its knees because a 23-year-old politicking student has arrived on the scene for nine days. The justification given to the British Embassy is just silly – Palestinians aren’t desperately waiting for him to arrive in order to have demonstrations. They’ll have demos whether he’s there or he’s not and they aren’t going to turn out on his command and do whatever he says either, as though he’s the messiah or something. This is why the airport security has scored an own goal: all they’ve done is to draw greater attention to how draconian it can be at the airport and get people talking about that. Is that what they wanted? From a PR perspective they’d have been better off letting him in for the nine days. It always surprises me how a country that is so preoccupied with hasbara could make mistakes such as these. He’s now had a far greater impact than he would have had if they’d left him alone.

          Reply to Comment
          • Kolumn9

            Thank you for your advice on hasbara. It is much appreciated.

            In the meantime Israel, as a sovereign state, can bar any foreigner from the country as it sees fit. It is most certainly not obligated to grant entry to persons dripping with hatred for the country. No good can come from it and no useful purpose can be served by their presence here. The policy is to limit entry for troublemakers such as this one and it is one which is reasonable regardless of whether he individually would be out there facing off with soldiers in the territories or coming up with fresh ways to cooperate with Dimi for a project to create anti-Israeli propaganda. From the point of view of Israel his presence is certainly unhelpful and definitely not required, so there really is no good reason to let him in.

            Reply to Comment
          • sh

            “It is most certainly not obligated to grant entry to persons dripping with hatred for the country”

            The whole point is that he wasn’t dripping with hatred for the country, or for people with your opinions for that matter. It must have been horribly bewildering for his Israeli interrogators to have been confronted with a creature like that.

            Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            >The whole point is that he wasn’t dripping with hatred for the country

            You have no idea of what you are talking about.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            Someone show is actively (sometimes violently) lobbying and promoting BDS against Israel in Europe and UN, claiming that Israel is an illegitimate, “racist” and “apartheid” country is indeed “drripling with hatred”.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            “Someone show …” should read: ‘someone who is …’

            Reply to Comment
          • Since I rather doubt Christian Zionists are being denied entry into Israel, all we have here is selective control over civil association with outsiders for Israeli citizens within Israel. One could have, for example, banned him from the territories upon threat of a 10 year ban to all of Israel upon violation. Instead, given his apparent lack of any record of crime or violence, he is banned to prevent association with Israels–and as a warning to the latter. Talk of “hostile to Israel,” etc., is simply another way of truncating the nonviolent political spectrum. Which is one of the great informative tasks provided by the national right on this site.

            However, the US does this as well. A high profile and somewhat bizarre case was the deportation of Yusuf Islam (formerly Cat Stevens) upon his arrival at a Washington airport. Then Sec. of State Colin Powell later said “we had credible evidence” of, well, something. Personally, I think his songs had coded messages. (He was and is a heavy contributor to Muslim causes and it may be that some umbrella organization he contributed to has been targeted by the US as shielding some violent group. But I know arrest or interrogation by the UK authorities in his home State. And I don’t believe his wife’s face has ever been seen; he is culturally conservative within Islam.)

            So the apparatchik looked at his phone log, decided there was someone they didn’t like on it, so sent him packing back, knowing commenters hereon would glory the decision.

            Not only are people not to be paid by foreigners (unless they are Christian Zionists planting forests in the Negev), but they are not to associate with “some types” on Israeli soil (again exempting Christian Zionists and, of course Glenn Beck). This is all an extension of the logic underlying the Boycott and Nakba Laws.

            It must be a blessing to be able to commune with the Corporate Body of Israel and Know its Way. Which is right. Right?

            Reply to Comment
          • Sorry:

            2nd Paragraph “I know arrest” should have read “I know of no arrest.” See what happens when “know” sounds like “no?” One sound is deleted in the writing.

            And, of course, the third paragraph returns to the unfortunate Spedding.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            “Instead, given his apparent lack of any record of crime or violence, he is banned to prevent association with Israels–and as a warning to the latter. Talk of “hostile to Israel,” etc”
            Does the above – Greg Pollock – not sound foolish even by your own standard? Israel is a country of law. If what you and Gary Redding claim (such as the above claim above), Gary Redding (or even you or any local org. acting on his behalf) can effectively challenge the ban in the Israeli Courts. But, Gary knows full well about significant parts of the data that has been gathered about his hostile activities against Israel. Via twitter and facebook, Gary is even warning his accomplices that their emails (to him) have been compromised. If Gary does not like his deportation and/or ban, he knows exactly what to do: appeal to the Israeli court. You can also do that for him or shut up and stop making false comparisons.

            Reply to Comment
          • You can hardly challenge in the courts when unable to deliver your petition to the court because blocked from entry into the country. In any case, exclusion of foreign nationals from a country is an executive matter.

            As to warning others that one’s email has been compromised by a foreign State, I think you would do the same.

            Actually, though, your comment, if correct, does reveal that Gary is an advocate of BDS, which would have been nice to know in the original piece.

            Boycott and the strike are evolved nonviolent tools. Yes, they can hurt economically, but they are not violent, and all conflict hurts in some way. But if you are going to ban advocacy of boycott in your own land, it is not surprising that you would ban an international advocate as well, hacking his phone a way of identifying fellow travelers. The ban makes more sense now, thank you for the presumed correct and new info. I think the result foolish, but that is another matter.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ginger Eis

            In a country founded on The Rule Of Law (such as Israel), all Acts of Government (e.g. executive orders) are subject to the law. The government may not act against private individuals without- or outside the perimeters of the law. If Gary is convinced that Israel did him injustice, he can (from outside Israel) contract any Israeli lawyer of his own choosing to act on his behalf, petition the Israeli court and have the entry ban vacated. I can assure you that Israeli courts are among the best in the Western world. What they permit sometimes in favor of the private individual would never be permitted by for example the Dutch or the Belgian courts (who take pride in their libralism), etc.

            Reply to Comment
          • Ginger, I don’t think there is much of a rule of law issue here. The executives of most States can bar many noncitizens from entry. Generally the embassy of the barred may ask for an explanation, but that doesn’t change the denial unless there is good will to do so (a mistake has been made). That’s why I mentioned Cat Stevens, now Yusuf Islam. He is a natural born UK citizen, but the US still deported him at his airport point of entry. There are administrative appeals at embassies. I encountered a case in Germany where a young German made a mistake at airport entry into the US. He was summarily barred for several years from re-entry. He went to the US embassy then in Bonn, and after hearing his story the embassy removed the ban. But that is not a court hearing, being done rather for good relations among peoples by the executive. Generally, courts do not hear ban entry cases, for one has no standing to make them. Israel may be different, but I rather doubt it; after all, Israel banned the MIT prof Noam Chomsky at entry too, and can certainly afford an attorney to make a fuss.

            While BDS advocacy is not criminal in Israel, it is a civil offense. I suspect he was banned for his Israeli contacts given his stance on BDS. I think it wrong, an unnecessary abuse of Israeli civil society over an internal political issue. No harm would have eventuated upon entry; as it is, a few opposed to the government find themselves once again marginalized.

            Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            >He doesn’t do anything that could be remotely considered dangerous.

            He spreads his self-pious bullshit. Dangerous? Maybe. Undesirable? Definitely.

            >The region is not going to be brought to its knees because a 23-year-old politicking student has arrived on the scene for nine days.

            Maybe. However, the region is certainly would do much better without someone who has some very biased view on the conflict, dishonest, engaged in politics for fun and is stupid enough to bring all his devices to the BGA.

            >He’s now had a far greater impact than he would have had if they’d left him alone.

            I’m not quite entirely sure of that.

            Reply to Comment
        • andrew r

          We have no need, nor desire, for any further European meddling in the region.

          Yeah, that outlived its usefulness once you got a Zionist state and a nuclear reactor.

          Reply to Comment
      • Noble

        Please. He is a wannabe pain-in-the-ass. His visit would have benefited nobody. Only you could come up with such a nonsensical conspiracy plot.

        Reply to Comment
    2. Jonathan Katz

      It’s especially sad, given that Spedding is
      a) a brilliant orator and
      b)one of the activists that is willing to call out anti-Semitism and white savior rhetoric in the pro-Palestinian movements.

      Of course the government doesn’t care because any critic is obviously so threatening that he can’t enter.

      Reply to Comment
      • Kolumn9

        Spedding is welcome to orate until his gums bleed in his own country. He is not welcome in mine.

        Reply to Comment
        • CDR

          He’s not welcome? Guess what? You’re not welcome in mine. Get out of Israel and go back to where your parents came from.

          Reply to Comment
        • Menil

          Speak for yourself. I’m Israeli and I welcome Mr. Spedding to my country, and hope that Israelis will learn a bit from him about tolerance and respect for other views.

          Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            >I’m Israeli and I welcome Mr. Spedding to my country

            Shame on you.

            >and hope that Israelis will learn a bit from him about tolerance and respect for other views.

            Thank you, but we do have more than enough smooth-talking scum made in Israel and really have no need to import any.

            Reply to Comment
    3. Carol Green

      A ‘self proclaimed’ high profile member of the Alliance party more like. Where is the quote from that party that they are going to run Mr Spedding as a candidate in the next election? The Israeli’s are right to do everything to protect the state from people who they feel are a security risk.

      Reply to Comment
    4. Woody

      More authoritarian control-freak behavior revealing the deep self-doubt and insecurity of border control.

      Reply to Comment
      • Joel

        No Woody.
        The message to Mr. Spedding and his fellow travelers is this,’Leave us alone to work out our problems with the Palestinians’.

        Reply to Comment
    5. Rehmat

      Doesn’t Netanyahu know that Gary Spedding is a welknown supporter of LGBT all over Europe? Tel Aviv could use him against Iran where, according to Israel Hasbara, LGBT people are put to death.

      Lol, Gary also supports Palestinians rights to fight for their stolen home land.

      http://rehmat1.com/2014/01/09/how-about-moving-american-jews-to-canada/

      Reply to Comment
      • Tomer

        This Spoilt European Brat can do his own pro-PLO terrorist speaking in his own country (not mine)

        Reply to Comment
      • Ben

        Yes Retread, he is consistent in his support for infiltrations of all kinds. He supports entry into Israel of Palestinians, and of …. well you know what else

        Reply to Comment
    6. Yani

      Gary is just the tip of an iceberg. You wait until a certain US/Israeli citizen tells her story after current legal channels are followed. They don’t just hand out 10 year bans, the Jewish machine is just as willing to make up a pack of lies and report those involved in justice for Palestine as terrorists to Interpol and Homeland Security.

      If they are going to deny people entry then they should insist on visa applications in advance and not waste precious resources and pollute the planet with air travel that is pointless.

      Everyone should fly to Israel via Jordan and cross the bridge. At least if you are turned back it is a walk and not a detention at the airport with all the costs associated with air travel. There is plenty that can be done from Jordan if you are rejected. Let Ben G Airport suffer a lack of passengers.

      Note that on the plane I was on 4 months ago, the Israelis held the takeoff up for 40 minutes as they argued over seat allocation. That was the last flight this Spanish airline every scheduled to Israel as they were over the obnoxious Israeli passengers. This behavior wasn’t a one off but the norm.

      If you fly into Jordan, you are treated with respect, people actually welcome you. If you care about the BDS then BDS Ben Gurion Airport!

      Reply to Comment
      • Marcos

        You are very good at telling interesting stories. I really like your succinct language and use of emotion. How can I be so lucky to be more exposed to your well-thought out musings and rapier-sharp wit?

        Reply to Comment
    7. Ilana Fine Bar-Hai

      I am very pleased to hear this. This despicable person accused me of lying about explosions and sirens in my hometown. He it seems is the one who lies. He twisted information, accused me of lying, when I was not and he got what he deserved. Excellent.

      Reply to Comment
      • Sara Sullam

        I recall that conversation on ynetnews, Ilana Fine Bar-Hai, you were in the midst of grad missiles in Ashkelon and heard an explosion with no siren and he called you basically a “drama queen”. Regardless of his opinions (and twists), I was astounded at his lack of empathy during a time like that and his arrogance of thinking he knew more about what was going on in your own hometown than you did. I felt he was horrible as a person after that and he lost all my respect for sure. Israel can certainly decide who can and who cannot enter the country, just as any other country can. He does not deserve Israel’s hospitality.

        Reply to Comment
    8. Menil

      Israel nowadays would probably haven’t allowed Nelson Mandela to enter it either, likely claiming that he’s a “terrorist” and “antisemite”.

      Reply to Comment
      • The Trespasser

        Considering what Mandela had done to his own country, his body should have been fed to hyenas.

        Reply to Comment
        • Menil

          I give you the Israeli consensus, ladies and gentlemen. And they think that Spedding is the one that should be banned?

          Reply to Comment
          • The Trespasser

            >I give you the Israeli consensus, ladies and gentlemen. And they think that Spedding is the one that should be banned?

            They think that Spedding should be banned from spreading his self-pious hypocritical bullshit, that’s all.

            Reply to Comment
      • Rafi

        well, Mandela was a terrorist and a murderer.

        Reply to Comment
      • Titanic

        I would have let Mandela in my house for sure, but would have counted the silverware when he left. And Winnie would not be allowed

        Reply to Comment
    9. Rehmat

      On December 15, 2011, semi-Israeli government daily The Jerusalem Post published a hateful article penned by Sam Westrop, director Institute for Middle Eastern Democracy (minus Israel), a London-based Israel advocacy group.

      “Gary Spedding, a peculiar creature who, according to some, suffers from a degree of Stockholm syndrome and believes himself to be a born-again Palestinian. Spedding has since denied this, and we can only speculate as to the state of his sanity; however, the company he keeps and the methods he adopts both tell a rather worrying story,” wrote Westrop

      http://rehmat1.com/2014/01/10/israel-uk-gay-rights-activist-is-security-threat/

      Reply to Comment
    10. Naftali

      Good that they deported him. We all know what their intention is towards us.

      How is it that not ONE of these so-called activists is wandering around Syria or Somalia or Yemen or Afghanistan helping the poor people there? After all, there are thousands being butchered there every day.

      I am sure if Gary went to Syria and spoke to the Assad people as well as the FSA and Al-Nusra, why, in no time there would be a sulcha. Spare us these self-proclaimed holier-than-thou hypocrites.

      Reply to Comment
    11. phil

      “British” ????

      the guy is from northern ireland.. britain is england, scotland and wales..

      That’s why UK passports state “The United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland”

      He is a citizen of the United Kingdom, not Britain

      Reply to Comment
    12. Ginger Eis

      Gary Redding is actively promoting BDS against Israeli companies and businesses in Europe and elswhere. His group lobbies representatives to pass bills banning Israeli products in Europe, etc. See e.g. Wikipedia: QUB Palestine Solidarity. Gary Redding is clearly a threat to the Israeli economy. Like all the jihadis and their appologists in the BDS-movement, Gary Redding is indeed a security threat.

      Reply to Comment
      • Gil Franco

        If he is boycotting Israel, he should be happy that he wasn’t let in. Similarly, the border officials should be fined for supporting the boycott.

        Reply to Comment
    13. The Trespasser

      [This comment has been deleted due to a veiled physical threat.]

      Reply to Comment
    14. Gil Franco

      Israeli government states says he was banned for participating in a demonstration against and Israeli speaker at Queens University in Belfast which caused the event to be cancelled and the speaker to evacuated from the premises by security personnel for his protection. Slightly different than the apparently erroneous claim here that it was due to social media activities.

      Reply to Comment
      • Ginger Eis

        Very good information. Thank you. That must, among others, be the compelling reason. Obviously Gary poses a physical danger to Israeli public officials. My information also seems to indicate that Garry & Co. are among those collecting personal data of IDF-soldiers/officers (whom they refer to as “regime elements”) for organisations intending to prosecute them for “war crimes”. If I were Gary, I would not only stay away from Israel but also from anywhere near any Israeli Embassy (to avoid fatal mistakes).

        Reply to Comment
    15. Harvey

      This is one of the reasons why Mr Spedding was refused entry .

      Disruptions (with Sinn Fein)
      An Israeli law lecturer had to be rescued by security officers when a seminar was abandoned after being disrupted by pro-Palestinian demonstrators, led by Gary Spedding.
      Solon Solomon, a former legal adviser to the Knesset Foreign Affairs committee, had been invited to speak to law school students at Queen’s University in Belfast. But he was heckled by members of the university’s Palestine Solidarity Society (PSS) and the youth wing of Sinn Féin shortly after starting his lecture about the legality of Israel’s security wall on Wednesday last week.
      Mr Spedding, who led the disruption in the lecture theatre by shouting at Mr Solomon, said the attack on the Israeli’s car was not perpetrated by PPS supporters and said he did not condone violence.[17]

      Reply to Comment
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