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PHOTOS: Army fires tear gas, rubber bullets at commemoration march for PA minister

Photos and by Yotam Ronen, Oren Ziv / Activestills.org

Palestinians run to take cover, as the Israeli army shoot tear gas, during a demonstration commemorating the death of Palestinian minister, Ziad Abu Ein, in the West Bank village of Turmus Aya, north of Ramallah, December 19, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinians run to take cover, as the Israeli army shoot tear gas, during a demonstration commemorating the death of Palestinian minister, Ziad Abu Ein, in the West Bank village of Turmus Aya, north of Ramallah, December 19, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Hundreds of demonstrators arrived Friday at the West Bank village of Turmus Aya to mark one week since the death of Palestinian Authority Minister Ziad Abu Ein. The protest took place not far from the Adei Ad outpost, where Abu Ein was attacked last week by an Israeli soldier. He died shortly thereafter in a Ramallah hospital.

Israeli border policemen arrest Palestinian activist Muhammad Khatib during a demonstration commemorating the death of Palestinian minister, Ziad Abu Ein, in the West Bank village of Turmus Aya, north of Ramallah, December 19, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Israeli border policemen arrest Palestinian activist Muhammad Khatib during a demonstration commemorating the death of Palestinian minister, Ziad Abu Ein, in the West Bank village of Turmus Aya, north of Ramallah, December 19, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

The army used rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse the protest. Muhammad Khatib, one of the central members of the Popular Struggle Coordination Committee, was arrested, along with an Israeli activist.

An Israeli solider with a roger riffle lies on the ground during a demonstration commemorating the death of Palestinian minister, Ziad Abu Ein, in the West Bank village of Turmus Aya, north of Ramallah, December 19, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

An Israeli solider with a roger riffle lies on the ground during a demonstration commemorating the death of Palestinian minister, Ziad Abu Ein, in the West Bank village of Turmus Aya, north of Ramallah, December 19, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

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Zionist Christians’ war on the true meaning of Christmas

The rhetoric of Christian Zionists consistently places loyalty to the modern state of Israel above the example and teachings of the Jesus born in Bethlehem whose birth Christmas celebrates. It’s time to stop calling such groups Christian Zionists and instead use the term Zionist Christians, to more accurately reflect their priorities.

Photos and text by: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org

Graffiti on the Israeli separation wall in the West Bank town of Bethlehem, December 16, 2010. (photo: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)

Graffiti on the Israeli separation wall in the West Bank town of Bethlehem, December 16, 2010. (photo: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)

For the last two years, Christians United for Israel (CUFI), the largest Christian Zionist organization in the U.S., has sent email blasts urging their supporters to fight back against the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement by buying Christmas ornaments “Made in Israel.” Or rather, by receiving these ornaments as a reward for a tax-deductible donation. One message urges supporters to “commemorate the birth of Jesus Christ with this symbolic ornament that was made in the land where Jesus was born.”

I don’t blame CUFI for flogging BDS to fill its own coffers. That’s just standard fundraising strategy. What offends me as a Christian is that while exploiting U.S. Christians’ sentimental perceptions of the Holy Land, they ignore the current situation in Bethlehem, they ignore Palestinian Christians, and worst of all, they ignore the Jesus they claim to follow.

Jesus was born in occupied territory. At the time, it was occupied by the Romans. Today, the West Bank town of Bethlehem is virtually surrounded by the Israeli separation barrier, which if completed as planned will confiscate some 64 square kilometers of the governorate’s land as nearby Israeli settlements continue to expand in violation of international law. How dare CUFI mention “the land where Jesus was born” without recognizing the plight of the Palestinian Christians who’ve carried his tradition to the present day?

When groups like CUFI do make a rare mention of Palestinian Christians, it is often to paint them as victims of Islamist persecution. This despite polls showing that Palestinian Christians overwhelmingly cite the Israeli occupation as the primary challenge in their lives.

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Three Palestinian activists exiled from Jerusalem for five months

Without explanation, three Jerusalemite Palestinians are given five-month bans from the city of their birth and residence. One is banned from the West Bank as well.

Text and photos by: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org

Daoud Al-Ghoul walks near graffiti painted by Israelis on properties taken over by settlers in the Muslim Quarter of Jerusalem's Old City, March 3, 2014. Many of these properties taken over by settlers are as small as a single room directly adjacent to Palestinian homes.

Daoud Al-Ghoul walks near graffiti painted by Israelis on properties taken over by settlers in the Muslim Quarter of Jerusalem’s Old City, March 3, 2014. Al-Ghoul was recently issued Israeli military orders banning him from both Jerusalem and the West Bank for five months. (photo: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)

In early December, three Jerusalem-born Palestinians received orders from Israeli authorities banning them from the city for a period of five months. Majd Darwish, Saleh Dirbas and Daoud Al-Ghoul first received phone calls saying that they were banned from entering the Old City. When they reported to the police station as requested they were given military orders banning them from all of Jerusalem until April 30, 2015.

The orders gave no reason for their exile. All three are prominent activists and community workers who have spent time in Israeli prisons.

In a Kafka-esque twist, Al-Ghoul received an additional military order a few days later banning him from the West Bank for six months. Al-Ghoul is a youth coordinator of the Health Work Committees (HWC), a Palestinian organization providing medical services. As a Jerusalem ID holder, he would normally be allowed to travel throughout Jerusalem, the West Bank, and Israel. Because Israel controls all borders, if he leaves the Palestinian territories, he risks being denied entry upon his return. This ironically means that Al-Ghoul’s only remaining option would be to stay inside the state of Israel. But according to the HWC, Al-Ghoul has returned to Jerusalem in protest of the various orders against him.

Daoud Al-Ghould talks with a neighbor of the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Silwan stand near a protest tent built by local activists, March 3, 2014. (photo: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)

Daoud Al-Ghoul talks with a neighbor next to a protest tent built by local activists in the...

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PHOTOS: Thousands take part in Palestinian minister's funeral in Ramallah

Text by Keren Manor, photos by Yotam Ronen, Oren Ziv / Activestills.org

Palestinian Authority Minister Ziad Abu Ein is carried during his funeral procession, Ramallah, December 11, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinian Authority soldiers carry the coffin of PA minister Ziad Abu Ein during his funeral procession, Ramallah, December 11, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Thousands gathered Thursday morning at the Palestinian Authority headquarters in Ramallah to participate in the funeral of PA minister Ziad Abu Ein. Abu Ein, who served as the Palestinian Authority’s settlement minister died the previous day during clashes with Israeli soldiers near the illegal West Bank outpost of Adei Ad.

Palestinian President Mahmous Abbas attended the funeral, and declared three days of national mourning. The attendees marched from the headquarters toward a cemetery in the nearby city of Al-Bireh, where Abu Ein was buried.

PA President Mahmoud Abbas looks on during the funeral of PA minister Ziad Abu Ein, Ramallah, December 11, 2014. (photo: Yotam Ronen/Activestills.org)

PA President Mahmoud Abbas looks on during the funeral of PA minister Ziad Abu Ein, Ramallah, December 11, 2014. (photo: Yotam Ronen/Activestills.org)

 

Members of Mahmoud Abbas' Presidential Guard look on during PA minister Ziad Abu Ein's funeral, Ramallah, December 11, 2014. (photo: Yotam Ronen/Activestills.org)

Members of Mahmoud Abbas’ Presidential Guard look on during PA minister Ziad Abu Ein’s funeral, Ramallah, December 11, 2014. (photo: Yotam Ronen/Activestills.org)

 

Thousands march from Ramallah to the Al-Bireh cemetery during Ziad Abu Ein's funeral procession, December 11, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Thousands march from Ramallah to the Al-Bireh cemetery during Ziad Abu Ein’s funeral procession, December 11, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

Thousands march from Ramallah to the Al-Bireh cemetery during Ziad Abu Ein's funeral procession, December 11, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Thousands march from Ramallah to the Al-Bireh cemetery during Ziad Abu Ein’s funeral procession, December 11, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

Members of the Al-Aqsa Martyr's Brigade fire into the air during Ziad Abu Ein's funeral procession, December 11, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)
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Replace fake co-existence photos with real images of co-resistance

The exposure of a popular ‘co-existence’ photo as a staged fabrication points to the need for better images of the path to a just peace.

Text and photo by: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org

A photograph intended to illustrate the peace process ended up being more accurate than intended. The now-iconic image showing a “Palestinian” and an Israeli boy walking arm in arm was a contrived set-up that anyone with experience in the region should have been able to spot as a fake.

The popular photo recently showed up in a tweet by Rihanna after she posted — and then quickly deleted — a tweet with the hashtag #FreePalestine during last summer’s Israeli offensive on Gaza.

While it’s certainly true that many Palestinian and Israeli Jewish children are friends with each other, those familiar with local culture would know that only older men wear their keffiyeh scarf the way this little boy is shown. As it turns out, the Jewish boy wearing the kippah (yarmulke) wasn’t even religious — so even he’s fake.

As The Forward reports, the original photo was taken by American photographer Ricki Rosen for a cover story about the Oslo peace accords for the Canadian news magazine Maclean’s:

What makes this photo the more-perfect-than-intended allegory for the peace process is that it was the product of Western directors who orchestrated an image of peacemaking in which Israeli Jews went through the motions and Palestinians were excluded in virtually everything but appearance. Despite enthusiasm abroad for each new round of talks, few on the ground — either Palestinians or Israeli Jews — had much hope for their success, at least in recent years. Facts on the ground such as ongoing settlement construction had long subverted any real prospects for a two-state solution.

Yet the process goes on in fits and starts — and images like this endure and proliferate — because people in the West cling to the idea that if we all just came together as human beings, we could solve this thing. The problem with that fantasy is that it ignores the structures of Israeli oppression, in which one side holds virtually all of the power.

But perhaps more encouragingly, the allegory of this image continues...

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PHOTOS: In West Bank village, Palestinian farmers go against the grain

For the first time in 14 years the farmers of Salem decided to reach their agricultural lands without permission from Israeli authorities. It wasn’t long, however, before Israeli settlers and soldiers came to disturb their work. 

Text and Photos: Ahmad al-Bazz / Activestills.org

Palestinian farmers sow their lands located behind a settlers' by-bass road, at Salem village, Nablus, West Bank, December 05, 2014. Photo by: Ahmad al-Bazz/Activestills.org

Palestinian farmers work their lands, located behind a settler by-bass road, Salem, Nablus, December 5, 2014. (Photo by: Ahmad al-Bazz/Activestills.org)

Every December, just after they have finished tilling their soil, Palestinian farmers in the West Bank head back to sow their land. Some of them plant wheat while others sow barley or other kinds of seeds.

However, not all Palestinians can do so freely. Farmers who own lands located near Israeli settlements, military camps or settler bypass roads are barred from accessing their land throughout most of the year. In these areas, Israeli authorities allow farmers to reach their lands only two times a year: once in April, during which they till the soil around olive trees, and again in October for the olive harvest. Because this process is limited to such a short time, it is usually not long enough to finish the work.

Due to the restrictions, many farmers have not been able to fully cultivate their land for years. On Saturday the farmers of Salem, a village located few kilometers east of the West Bank city of Nablus, decided to access their land without permission from the Israeli authorities for the first time in 14 years. The land is located behind an Israeli bypass road used by the settlers of Elon Moreh.

Elon Moreh settlement seen from the agricultural lands of Salem village, Nablus, West Bank, December 5, 2014. Photo by: Ahmad al-Bazz/Activestills.org

The Elon Moreh settlement seen from the agricultural lands of Salem, Nablus, West Bank, December 5, 2014. (Photo by: Ahmad al-Bazz/Activestills.org)

Together with Palestinian and international activists, the farmers headed to their lands. After quickly crossing the bypass road, they performed Friday prayers on their land, after which they managed to till the soil, plant several olive trees and sow the land with barley.

It wasn’t long before Israeli settlers took notice of...

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PHOTOS: Following arson, thousands march with integrated J'lem school

Two first-grade classrooms were targeted by arsonists who left racist graffiti at one of the country’s only mixed Jewish-Arab schools.

Thousands of people march through Jerusalem in support and solidarity with the Max Rayne “Hand in Hand” bilingual school, which was the target of a racist arson attack a week earlier, Jerusalem, December 5, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Thousands of people march through Jerusalem in support and solidarity with the Max Rayne “Hand in Hand” bilingual school, which was the target of a racist arson attack a week earlier, Jerusalem, December 5, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Roughly 2,000 people — students, teachers and parents from “Hand in “Hand” schools from across Israel — marched through the streets of Jerusalem Friday morning to the Max Rayne bilingual school, which was the target of an arson attack last weekend. Many others joined the march in support the school and to speak out against racism, including activists and at least one member of Knesset, Jamal Zahalka of Balad.

Last Saturday night, still unidentified arsonists broke into two first-grade classrooms, piled the books in the middle of the room and set them on fire. One classroom was completely destroyed and the second was severely damaged. The arsonists also left racist graffiti, reading “Death to Arabs” and “There can be no coexistence with cancer.”

Read also: ‘We will overcome’: Arson and mourning at J’lem school

Most schools in Israel serve Jews or Arabs separately, in addition to separation between secular and religious students. Racially and religiously integrated schools are the exception and there are only a small number of them, most of them are private and they serve only a fraction of a percent of Israel’s children.

Since the arson attack, a wide range of civil society groups and politicians have offered their support and solidarity as well as outrage over the hate crime. Other schools in the city marched in support and Israeli President Reuven Rivlin hosted the younger children at his official residence.

Thousands of people march through Jerusalem in support and solidarity with the Max Rayne “Hand in Hand” bilingual school, which was the target of a racist arson attack a week earlier, Jerusalem, December 5, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)
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Photos of the month: Jerusalem ignites while Gaza still smolders

As violence increased in Jerusalem, residents of war-torn Gaza continued struggling to survive and cope with slow reconstruction and approaching winter weather. These and other images in our month in photos, November 2014.

Palestinians salvage materials from destroyed homes in the village of Khuza'a, eastern Gaza Strip, November 6, 2014. Many Palestinians in the Gaza Strip face hard living conditions following the seven-week Israeli offensive during which 2,131 Palestinians were killed, and an estimate of 18,000 housing units have been either destroyed or severely damaged, leaving more than 108,000 people homeless. (photo: Activestills.org)

Palestinians salvage materials from destroyed homes in the village of Khuza’a, eastern Gaza Strip, November 6, 2014. Many Palestinians in the Gaza Strip face hard living conditions following the seven-week Israeli offensive during which 2,131 Palestinians were killed, and an estimate of 18,000 housing units were either destroyed or severely damaged, leaving more than 108,000 people homeless. (photo: Activestills.org) See more photos of Gaza damage and reconstruction here.

 

Palestinian youth fire fireworks during clashes with Israel police in Jerusalem's old city, November 7, 2014. (photo: Activestills.org)

Palestinian youth shoot fireworks during clashes with Israel police in Jerusalem’s old city, November 7, 2014. (photo: Activestills.org) See more photos here. More photos of clashes in Jerusalem here.

 

A Palestinian woman and her daughter run to take cover during clashes with Israeli border police at the checkpoint separating Shuafat refugee camp from Jerusalem, November 6, 2014. (photo: Activestills.org)

A Palestinian woman and her daughter run to take cover during clashes with Israeli border police at the checkpoint separating Shuafat refugee camp from the rest of Jerusalem, November 6, 2014. (photo: Activestills.org)

 

A Palestinian youth cover his face to avoid tear gas, during clashes of Palestinian youth with Israeli border police at a checkpoint between Shuafat refugee camp and Jerusalem, November 7, 2014. Clashes broke after a Palestinian man drove a car into a crowd, killing a policeman and injuring 13 people in Jerusalem on November 5. (photo: Activestills.org)

A Palestinian youth covers his face to avoid tear gas during clashes between Palestinian youth and Israeli border police at a checkpoint...

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PHOTOS: Floods hit Gaza as war-hit infrastructure struggles

Hard hit during the summer’s war, civilian infrastructure is having a hard time coping with heavy rains.

Photos and reporting: Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

The latest storm to hit the eastern Mediterranean region flooded large areas of Gaza City this week. The Al-Nafeq neighborhood, one of the lowest areas of Gaza City, suffered from severe flooding, exacerbated by the damage Gaza’s civilian infrastructure sustained during the war with Israel this past summer.

Entire streets were flooded with as much as 1.5 meters of water. A number of people, primarily the elderly and children, were rescued from the hardest-hit areas by emergency responders.

The homes in the neighborhood, many of which haven’t yet been repaired since the war, are now sustaining water damage. A large number of residents, having only returned to their homes in recent weeks since the war, were forced to take their belongings and leave once again.

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters flooding the neighborhood, Gaza City, November 27, 2014. Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters flooding the neighborhood, Gaza City, November 27, 2014. Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters flooding the neighborhood, Gaza City, November 27, 2014. Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters flooding the neighborhood, Gaza City, November 27, 2014. Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters flooding the neighborhood, Gaza City, November 27, 2014. Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters flooding the neighborhood, Gaza City, November 27, 2014. Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters flooding the neighborhood, Gaza City, November 27, 2014. Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters flooding the neighborhood, Gaza City, November 27, 2014. Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters flooding the neighborhood, Gaza City, November 27, 2014. Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters flooding the neighborhood, Gaza City, November 27, 2014. Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters flooding the neighborhood, Gaza City, November 27, 2014. Basel Yazouri/Activestills.org

Residents of Al-Nafaq in high waters...

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Israeli forces kill Palestinian, first in Gaza since ceasefire

In the first such killing since the ceasefire that ended Israel’s offensive last summer, troops shoot and kill a Palestinian farmer near Gaza’s border.

Palestinian workers salvage building materials near Erez Crossing at Gaza’s northern border, Beit Hanoun, May 11, 2014. Human rights organizations have documented dozens of cases of Israeli army gunfire at persons who posed no threat and were well outside the 300-meter so-called “no-go zone” imposed by the Israeli military inside Gaza’s borders. In many cases, no warning was given before soldiers opened fire. (photo: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)

Palestinian workers salvage building materials near Erez Crossing at Gaza’s northern border, Beit Hanoun, May 11, 2014. Human rights organizations have documented dozens of cases of Israeli army gunfire at persons who posed no threat and were well outside the 300-meter so-called “no-go zone” imposed by the Israeli military inside Gaza’s borders. In many cases, no warning was given before soldiers opened fire. (photo: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)

Israeli forces shot and killed Palestinian farmer Fadel Mohammed Halawa, 32, near Gaza’s border with Israel on Sunday. Relatives say he was searching for songbirds that fetch high prices in Gaza markets.

An Israeli military spokesperson said that troops warned two Palestinians to leave the border zone and first fired warning shots. “Once they didn’t comply, they fired towards their lower extremities. There was one hit,” a spokesperson told Al Jazeera.

Gaza medical officials told the BBC that Halawa was shot in the back, and that the shots appeared to have been fired from an Israeli border watchtower.

Halawa is the first Palestinian to be killed since the ceasefire that ended the Israeli offensive known as “Operation Protective Edge.” According UN statistics, Israeli attacks killed some 2,200 Palestinians in seven weeks, most of them civilians. Rockets from Gaza killed five civilians in Israel, and 66 Israeli soldiers died in the fighting. Israeli forces have shot and wounded several Palestinians since the start of the ceasefire.

Two of Nizar Al-Wan’s sons look on as he recovers in his home in the Gaza village of Jabalya the day after being shot by Israeli forces near the northern border, May 12, 2014. (photo: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)

Two of Nizar Al-Wan’s sons look on as he recovers in his home in the...

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PHOTOS: Sudanese refugees protest gender violence

Photos by Oren Ziv / Activestills.org

Sudanese asylum seekers protest outside the European Union Embassy, November 25, 2014, Ramat Gan, Israel. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Sudanese asylum seekers protest outside the European Union Embassy, November 25, 2014, Ramat Gan, Israel. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Approximately 200 Sudanese asylum seekers marked International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women on Tuesday by demonstrating against the European Union’s lack of action regarding Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir. The protest comes in the wake of the mass rape of hundreds of women and girls in Darfur at the hands of al-Bashir’s soldiers over the last several months.

The demonstrators marched from Levinsky Park in south Tel Aviv to the building that houses the European Union delegation to Israel in Ramat Gan, demanding that the EU intervene in order to stop the rape and ethnic cleansing in Sudan, as well as try al-Bashir for war crimes.

Mutasim Ali, one of the leaders of the asylum seeker movement in Israel, explained in the lead-up to the protest that demonstrators decided to target the EU because “the UN is in Sudan but not doing anything.”

Sudanese asylum seekers march to the EU Embassy in Ramat Gan, November 25, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Sudanese asylum seekers march to the EU Embassy in Ramat Gan, November 25, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

“The African Union is also here, but they are hiding,” says Ali. “They do not want to properly investigate and are actually cooperating with the regime. The European Union can call on the government of Sudan to put a stop to this.”

Related:
Israel hasn’t recognized one Sudanese refugee
The origins and politics of Israel’s refugee debate

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PHOTOS: In Gaza, rebuilding is still over the horizon

With the humanitarian crisis more dire than ever before, the extreme need in Gaza continues to far outstrip the trickle of resources allowed to enter.

Photos: Anne Paq/Activestills.org
Text: Ryan Rodrick Beiler

Click here for +972′s full coverage of the Gaza war

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PHOTOS: Palestinians build a bridge over the separation wall

The non-violent direct action is in protest of restrictions on access to the Aqsa Mosque that Israel places on Palestinian worshipers from the West Bank.

Palestinians and international activists use make-shift bridges to cross the separation wall between Qalandiya and Jerusalem, November 14, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinians and international activists use make-shift bridges to cross the separation wall between Qalandiya and Jerusalem, November 14, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Some 50 Palestinian and international activists used two make-shift bridges to cross the separation wall between Qalandiya and northern Jerusalem Friday morning. They also cut razor wire adjacent to the wall.

The non-violent direct action was in protest of the restrictions on access to the Aqsa Mosque that Israel places on Palestinians from the West Bank.

Separately, following a tripartite meeting between U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Jordan’s King Abdullah about tensions on the Temple Mount and in Jerusalem, Israel Police announced that it was suspending the ban on worshippers under the age of 50.

That change, however, will not affect the ability of West Bank Palestinians to reach the Old City of Jerusalem, where the mosque is located. Decisions to grant entry permits for West Bank residents are made by the army and Shin Bet.

Palestinians and international activists use make-shift bridges to cross the separation wall between Qalandiya and Jerusalem, November 14, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinians and international activists use make-shift bridges to cross the separation wall between Qalandiya and Jerusalem, November 14, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinians and international activists cut razor wire after crossing the separation wall between Qalandiya and Jerusalem, November 14, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Palestinians and international activists cut razor wire after crossing the separation wall between Qalandiya and Jerusalem, November 14, 2014. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

At the Hizme checkpoint, used by West Bank settlers to commute to Jerusalem, Palestinians attempted to march toward the holy city. They blocked Israeli traffic and were eventually dispersed by soldiers and police.

Palestinians attempt to march to Jerusalem through the Hizme checkpoint, blocking traffic and protesting against restrictions Israel...</img></img></img></div><a href=Read More
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